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seen Oct 29 '13 at 20:07

May
31
comment What is “surime”?
In Spain I have heard sometimes "surimi" to refer to what it is more commonly called "palitos de cangrejo". Though according to wikipedia it's not exactly the same (the "palitos de cangrejo" are made of "surimi"). es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palito_de_cangrejo
May
29
comment ¿Cómo se dice regionalmente “coquetear”?
@CesarGon en el centro de España también es muy común.
May
22
comment What's the difference between “vamos” and “vámonos”?
I think the difference in meaning between "leave from" and "go to" cases is the preposition you use in Spanish after the verb "ir" ("ir/irse a" vs "ir de"). When you use "a" preposition you can say both e.g. ¡Vamos a la playa! or ¡Vámonos a la playa! but when you use "de" the pronominal form is the one used e.g. ¡Vámonos de la playa! (and not ¡vamos de la playa!)
Apr
25
comment What's the difference between “dentro” and “adentro”?
@Phoenix Sí. Lo mismo pasa con "fuera" y "afuera".
Apr
19
comment What's the origin of words ended in letter “j”?
From that list, Boj is also quite known, at least in Spain because there is a quite famous novel called "Madera de boj" written by the very well-known writer "Camilo José Cela". I agree the rest are unused (at least I have never seen or heard of any.)
Apr
19
comment Translation of “What goes around comes around”
@GonzaloMedina thanks I've added it to the answer
Apr
17
comment Shorter/alternate version of refrigerator
@kelmer I often hear "frigo" and "nevera" in Spain. Probably more "frigo" because "nevera" is also used for a cool box for a picnic and the term can be ambiguous sometimes.
Apr
13
comment Ironic constructions in Spanish
I think that irony depends much on the context and the intonation you give to the sentence instead of on the structure of the sentence.
Apr
10
comment What is the role of the “le” in the sentence “Miguel le dio a su novia un anillo.”?
Yes, "el anillo" is the direct object and "su novia" is the indirect one. The easiest way of discovering the direct object is to change the sentence to passive voice. The subject of the passive voice is the direct object of the active voice: "El anillo fue dado a su novia por Miguel"
Apr
9
comment What is the role of the “le” in the sentence “Miguel le dio a su novia un anillo.”?
I think that "le" is not mandatory in that sentence. "Yo daré el libro a Jorge" sounds good to me. Indeed RAE says it's optional in the section 5.2.a of this link buscon.rae.es/dpdI/…
Apr
9
comment Algún to represent an indefinite quantity?
@beanland yeah "algún" can only be used before a noun (in the cases shown in the answer) to describe that there is some amount of it.
Mar
28
comment How big are the regional differences in the Spanish spoken in different countries?
Not only in the grammar and vocabulary but also in pronunciation. For instance the Latin American pronunciation of words like "casar/cazar" or "abrasar/abrazar" can lead to confusion in Spain. But native speakers can usually detect the meaning in the context. And if not you can always ask.
Mar
28
comment What is the meaning of the phrase “¿Cómo ves?”?
In Spain if you say "Cómo ves?" you're asking if the eyesight is good or not (as if you were in the ophthalmologist). We use "Como lo ves?" instead as kelmer says. Though we use "como ves" as a tag to say something like "as you can see".
Mar
23
comment Use of “Veni”? Is it a real word?
If you join a conjugated verb with an infinitive verb is like if you say in English: "come and to see*" or "come and seeing*". It doesn't make sense. Maybe that fragment can be part of a sentence where "ven" is used inside a subordinate clause where the main clause has the verb in infinitive form. For example in a to-do List: "Seguir las instrucciones que ven y ver si se consigue el resultado". But a sentence like "ven y ver" is senseless.
Mar
23
comment Use of “Veni”? Is it a real word?
"ven y ver" is not correct. You should conjugate the second verb (it can't be in infinitive). So it can be in imperative: "ven y ve (esto)" (though it sounds a bit unnatural) or in future: "ven y verás".
Mar
23
comment Use of “Veni”? Is it a real word?
Maybe he heard "ven y" (and understood "veni") as in a sentence like "ven y prueba esto".
Mar
21
comment What exactly are “mis rasgos”?
+1 because of the flirting lesson ;)
Mar
20
comment How do you describe a slight right/left turn (bearing left or right)?
Maybe "gira ligeramente hacia..." can work. I had never heard "pequeña derecha/izquierda"maybe its use is regional.
Mar
20
comment What would be a good way to express “You can't get something out of nothing”?
Just point out that this sentence is usually used for complaining about the inability of someone to do something.
Mar
16
comment What's the difference between “sólo”, “únicamente” and “solamente”?
@JuanZe Not always (it can mean other things), but many times they are synonyms :)