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Jun
5
comment ¿Es correcto “siempre quieren y terminan sometiendo”?
@JoulSauron ok.
Jun
5
answered ¿Es correcto “siempre quieren y terminan sometiendo”?
Jun
4
revised What's the difference between “vamos” and “vámonos”?
deleted 1 characters in body
May
31
comment What is “surime”?
In Spain I have heard sometimes "surimi" to refer to what it is more commonly called "palitos de cangrejo". Though according to wikipedia it's not exactly the same (the "palitos de cangrejo" are made of "surimi"). es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palito_de_cangrejo
May
29
comment ¿Cómo se dice regionalmente “coquetear”?
@CesarGon en el centro de España también es muy común.
May
25
awarded  Nice Answer
May
25
revised ¿Por qué mis amigas dicen “listo” en vez de “lista” cuando están listas para ir?
edited title
May
23
revised What's the difference between “vamos” and “vámonos”?
added 1 characters in body
May
22
comment What's the difference between “vamos” and “vámonos”?
I think the difference in meaning between "leave from" and "go to" cases is the preposition you use in Spanish after the verb "ir" ("ir/irse a" vs "ir de"). When you use "a" preposition you can say both e.g. ¡Vamos a la playa! or ¡Vámonos a la playa! but when you use "de" the pronominal form is the one used e.g. ¡Vámonos de la playa! (and not ¡vamos de la playa!)
May
22
revised What's the difference between “vamos” and “vámonos”?
added 58 characters in body
May
22
revised What's the difference between “vamos” and “vámonos”?
added 1 characters in body
May
22
revised What's the difference between “vamos” and “vámonos”?
added 77 characters in body
May
22
answered What's the difference between “vamos” and “vámonos”?
May
21
answered “My kind of ___” in Spanish
Apr
25
comment What's the difference between “dentro” and “adentro”?
@Phoenix Sí. Lo mismo pasa con "fuera" y "afuera".
Apr
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
19
comment What's the origin of words ended in letter “j”?
From that list, Boj is also quite known, at least in Spain because there is a quite famous novel called "Madera de boj" written by the very well-known writer "Camilo José Cela". I agree the rest are unused (at least I have never seen or heard of any.)
Apr
19
comment Translation of “What goes around comes around”
@GonzaloMedina thanks I've added it to the answer
Apr
19
revised Translation of “What goes around comes around”
added 78 characters in body
Apr
17
comment Shorter/alternate version of refrigerator
@kelmer I often hear "frigo" and "nevera" in Spain. Probably more "frigo" because "nevera" is also used for a cool box for a picnic and the term can be ambiguous sometimes.