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5

You are right. This phenomenon goes all the way back to Vulgar Latin and applies to other Romance languages, as well. First of all, a little phonetics background: the vowels /e/ and /i/ are what phoneticians call front vowels, because they are articulated in the frontal part of the mouth, unlike, for example, /a/, /o/ and /u/, which are articulated more to ...


4

In a book I have on Spanish phonetics and phonology (Fonética y fonología españolas by Armin Schwegler and Juergen Kempff), this is classified as la conversión de hiatos en diptongos (interior de palabras). Some excerpts (note that not all linguistic symbols are exact, emphasis on toalla mine): Como ya hemos explicado en el capítulo anterior, en el habla ...


4

Se llama lenguaje con ortografía fonológica (English: phonemic orthography) En una ortografía fonológica cada grafema se corresponde con un fonema.


4

No estoy seguro de si hay otros términos para referirse al mismo hecho, pero yo lo he visto escrito como idioma u ortografía «transparentes». Es decir, que posee un sistema ortográfico en el que existe un alto grado de correspondencia entre los grafemas (símbolos escritos) y los fonemas (sonidos pronunciados). Esto no se reduce a las vocales, sino que abarca ...


4

There is an orthographic rule: a, e, o are strong vowels, i, u are weak vowels. y is like i. There can be only one strong vowel in a syllable, they never combine into a diphthong. ca-os, le-ón, le-er When a strong and a weak vowel are next to each other (or separated by h) they form a diphthong. Eu-ro-pa, hia-to, rei-na There are cases when a strong vowel ...


4

All spoken languages have both vowels and consonants. Vowels and consonant are simply the two broadest classifications of vocal sounds. A vowel is defined as a sound in spoken language, pronounced with an open vocal tract so that there is no build-up of air pressure at any point above the glottis And a consonant as a speech sound that is ...


2

Vowels: a e i o u Consonants: b c d f g h j k l m n ñ p q r s t v w x y z


1

According to the wikipedia article, the C (and G) pronunciation diverged because of phonological reasons, it seems that quite early, and in common (at least in a first phase) with other romance languages (french, italian). See also the (in english, more general) wikipedia articles: C and G


1

Once I posted an answer about calculating syllables in Spanish, the question was "Rules applied to the separation of syllables". A guide stated that: A diphthong is a single syllables having two vowels. It must be an unstressed closed vowel (i, u) and an open vowel (a, e, o), or two closed vowels. The possible combinations are ai, ei, oi, au, eu, ou, ...



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