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Una graduación, un ascenso en el trabajo, un premio ganado, cualquier victoria o logro, evoca el saludo “¡Felicitaciones!” (When you graduate, get a promotion, win an award, use "Felicitaciones") En cambio, momentos trascendentes de la condición humana, del ciclo anual o los grandes pasajes vitales —el nacimiento de un hijo, un cumpleaños, una boda, Navidad ...


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It means I always want to look at you because mirarte is a conjugation of mirarse but means to look at you.


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As Kent said: it literally means I want to look at you always, but in a real context it doesn't mean it literally. I think she is using this phrase in a metaphorical or poetic statement, telling you that she wants to keep seeing you for a long time Hope it helps you!


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Probably she would say: Yo quiero mirarte para siempre. I'm not entirely sure, but this sentence is just a way to flirt with you.


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Literally, it means I want to look at you always. I am not sure if it is a local idiom with a double meaning.


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I have heard and use "amá" and "apá".


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In Baja California, I've often heard "mi amá" in the third person and "má" in the second. For father/dad I wasn't paying attention, or else I've forgotten.


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I was just told "te quiero". How do i know it's just "i like you"? Because I've heard her talk to her ex (when they were together) n end their convos with "te amo" or a right to the point; no grey area "i love you". It all depends where your relationship is at.


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The symbols in Spanish always stay the same. So the "&" symbol would still be "&". If you were to say "and" in Spanish it would be "y".


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In Dominican Republic we call it "y comercial" since in spanish "y" means "and"



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