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'El mejor valor por su dinero'. ('the best value for your money') It's so commonly used by Mexicans that is often abused by advertisers, marketers, and retailers all over Mexico to the point that it sounds cliched


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In Spanish you would say that something Tiene una buena (o mala) relación calidad-precio


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I definitely have seen more frequently the term prensa amarilla, literally "yellow press", sometimes also adjectived amarillista or "yellowist". In a few cases I have also heard prensa barata or "cheap press", or the use of pejorative/obscene terms.


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"La prensa del corazón" or "prensa rosa" are those magazines that inform about the lives of famous or notorious people (gossip magazine and the likes). "Tabloid" can be translated simply as "Tabloide" which refers to sensationalist press. This has a boarder meaning than prensa rosa, because you can be sensationalist when talking about politics (which you ...


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Start with shows and songs for kids, then gradually move up from there. Just think about how most of us were raised. We didn't watch documentaries when we were young and then sesame street as adults.


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Is duolingo too easy for you? I find that app very helpful although I'm just a beginner.


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I would argue that only listening to songs is not enough. People might say to themselves that "they're learning" when they do such things, while actually your mind is more likely enjoying some entertainment than sharpening language skills with concentration. They can serve as an aide, but not the main means. One key practice that helped me massively was to ...


1

Just returned from the Dominican Republic this week - the small town of Guerra to be exact where they explained tigre (tiguere is the animal there) and Tiguerona to me. It definitely is used with a good connotation as well as a bad one. Doesn't always have to be negative. A person who is wise and street smart and someone who will take advantage of the ...


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I used to listen to hispanic music, and still do, and I used to try and transcribe the lyrics by ear. Since Spanish is written as it sounds, with a little practice, it's very easy. I would look through my dictionary to find the words I heard, proofread them, translate them, and continue on until I could babble along with the song in unison. I would mimic ...


3

I can tell you that studying (vocabulary, grammar, etc.) is always key. Sooner or later you will reach a level of proficiency enough to understand and be understood with a decent level of fluency. If you stop studying then your vocabulary will become "stagnant" since you'll stick to the words you know, use workarounds, etc. Basically, you'll make do with ...


0

I only can remember this things happen to slangs or coloquial words: Pincho ->Argentina: grilled meat in a stick. ->Perú: vulgar word for penis. Cabro ->Chile: Child or young. ->Perú: Gay, homosexual


0

No son opuestos, pero casi: calzón: en algunas zonas es prenda interior y en otras exterior. torta: en Chile es un bizcocho dulce. En otras zonas es una masa salada, (lo que en Chile conocemos como "sánguche"). Esto lo deduzco del Chavo del Ocho. colectivo: en Argentina es un autobús. En Chile es un automóvil (un taxi). Éste es el más forzado ...


3

As in English, in Spanish they're a lot of adverbs that express frequency and when you're not speaking about always or never it will depend on the emphasis you want to give it rather than the meaning of the word itself, at least, that's how I think and what I usually hear from the people, and language is more trying to communicate to other people rather than ...


1

"a menudo" or "con mucha frecuencia" are used in Spain. When I lived in Barcelona and Madrid I never once heard "seguido" used in that way. In fact, when someone from Mexico said it to me recently, I didn't know what they were talking about.


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Mae comes from shoe makers that would make apprentices hammer leather to soften it over a century ago. Because it is practically useless, the apprentices and their bosses felt it was a punishment for learners; more like a practical joke for those coming through the ranks, or dumb ones (tontos in Spanish). The term has since being linked with fools, ...


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Between people who don't know his name is called "El símbolo de y" (the symbol of and).


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In Colombia and Ecuador and Peru and Venezuela we have always used e comercial (pronounciation, et comercial written). In Mexico, Cuba and the Dominican Republic I've seen them use y comercial In Spain as Hnavarro said they use ampersand. In my humble opinion e comercial is more adapted to the spanish language. Ampersand is more of english and mostly used ...



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