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9

There is a spectrum of attraction and affection, which of course exists in both English and Spanish. How one expresses their level of affection and attraction along the spectrum is a difficult thing to pin-point in any language, and often subject to interpretation, body language, and other clues. But generally speaking, I think it's fairly safe to say that ...


9

legumbre: is actually a technical term: any member of the "legumes". That includes peas, beans, etc. In Spanish it is not used for peanuts or soy, although they are still "legumes", because the way they are eaten is different from the traditional legumbres. vegetal: is again a technical term: anything from the "plant" kingdom. It is not used for ...


9

Yes, according to the RAE dictionary, the use of ora with this meaning has its origin as a shortened form of ahora: ora. (Afér.). 1. conj. distrib. ahora. Tomando ora la espada, ora la pluma. So, it replaces ahora only with a specific meaning: when it's used as a conjunción distributiva. Note that this is a rather archaic use, so you'll ...


7

I would use «vientre» as the anatomical description of the area (both interior and exterior and without consideration of size), similar to «abdomen», while «barriga» and «panza» would be more used for a slightly rounded or greatly over-sized one from an external point of view. For the official definitions: vientre. (Del lat. venter, -tris). m. ...


7

Esa palabra se incluyo como parte de una campaña publicitaria. No tiene validez oficial. En principio la RAE es la encargada de aceptar palabras y periodicamente agrega palabras de uso comun o de nueva creación. Hay palabras o variaciones que se usan comunmente que no estan reconocidas pero seria dificil decir que son incorrectas debido a su uso comun. En ...


6

Usually, kid's meal is translated as menú infantil. @c.p. answers are ok. In Spain, you should always say sándwich, because emparedado sounds a bit old-fashioned.


6

Una opción que no suena tan negativa es introducir la "noticia" directamente con una frase, por ejemplo: No ha sido posible blah blah blah, porque bleh bleh bleh. Lamento comunicarles que blah blah blah, porque bleh bleh bleh. Ello, dado que los sinónimos de desafortunado tienen todos, como es de esperarse, una connotación negativa.


6

I am turning 30. Voy a cumplir treinta años. I just turned 30. Acabo de cumplir treinta años.


5

At least in my environment (Argentina): estar harto de algo estar agotado de algo are similar, and in some cases can be interchangeable, but estar harto is more akin to "I'm fed up with", "I cannot stand that anymore". While estar agotado is primarily equivalent to "be very tired". This is more used when one is tired because of some work one ...


5

Segun RAE: Unido a aquí, ahí y allí, o con los pronombres me, te, la, le, lo, las, los, se usa para señalar o mostrar a alguien o algo. y segun wikitionary: Unido a un pronombre personal clítico ("me, te, le, nos, os, les") o a un adverbio de lugar ("aquí, allí, ahí", etc.), señala la presencia o existencia de algo. En ambos casos lo señalan como ...


5

Your original translation is accurate: hot chocolate = chocolate caliente


5

As others have said, this is not a commonly spoken word, but is found mostly in poetry and writing, perhaps especially used in folk and children tales. I would use "acá y acullá" as the equivalent of "hither and yon". As an aside, The RAE defines "acullá" as adv. l. A la parte opuesta de quien habla. U. en contraposición a adverbios demostrativos de ...


5

In Spain you can use poder for both cases, it's OK. But, if you want to specify that you cannot do something because is forbidden, you can use no tienes permitido ... or tienes prohibido ... clauses. For example: El doctor dice que no puedes beber ni zumo ni leche. El doctor dice que no tienes permitido beber ni zumo ni leche. El doctor dice ...


5

I tend to be skeptical about claims of "language A has x times many more words than language B". Personally, I have been using Spanish and English literally every single day for the last 12 years and I still haven't encountered a situation in which I had to use English because Spanish didn't have a word for the concept I was trying to express (or vice ...


5

Por ejemplo: Tengo que comprar alguna que otra cosa = I have to buy some things Veo alguna que otra película = I see the ocassional movie / I see a movie every once and a while.


5

To refer to the hole I don't think there is specific word, it's el ojo de la aguja. However, to refer to the action of inserting the thread in the hole, enhebrar is used. enhebrar. 1. tr. Pasar la hebra por el ojo de la aguja o por el agujero de las cuentas, perlas. In a sentence: Para poder coser la costura primero tienes que enhebrar la aguja. ...


5

Chupa is a familiar term (slang?) for jacket, particularly a leather jacket. It may also mean an old jacket-like garment (see here). De boda is simply wedding. It may be literal: a jacket to go to a wedding; or figurative: a very smart jacket.


4

In general, mejilla is the anatomic term for cheek, cachete is rather informal. Cachete can also refer to a smack on the cheek as well as to the buttock. So, without context cachete would be ambiguous. The actual usage of the words differs between countries. When referring to the cheeks, I guess mejilla is more common in Spain, while cachete is more likely ...


4

I guess this is very region dependent. I understand "fregadero" because of dubbings, but in my neck of the woods (Argentina) nobody ever says "fregadero"; here it's "pileta de lavar" (or just "pileta"); "bacha" is also used.


4

diario is the common word -by far- in Argentina. periódico is understood here as a formal (or "foreign") synonym. Stricly speaking, "diario" is more restricted in meaning (daily newspaper), but common usage does not respect that much anymore - one could even hear about a "diario semanal".


4

In the web is common the use of: Acerca de <La ComeBotella> ¿Quiénes somos? <<== Most common Sobre Nosotros


4

Here you have all of them: 1 H Hidrógeno Hydrogen 2 He Helio Helium 3 Li Litio Lithium 4 Be Berilio Beryllium 5 B Boro Boron 6 C Carbono Carbon 7 N Nitrógeno Nitrogen 8 O Oxígeno Oxygen 9 F Flúor Fluorine 10 Ne Neón Neon 11 Na Sodio Sodium 12 Mg Magnesio Magnesium 13 Al Aluminio Aluminium 14 ...


4

Prepositions in both languages are not equal, it is a nightmare for Spanish people to learn English prepositions, and viceversa can happen the same ;) To can be translated as a, de, hacia, ... De can be translated to from, of, to, by, ... If I give you the case Which are the effects of not studying ? The literal translation would be Cuales son ...


4

Usage of the words "plátano" and "banana" depends slightly on the zones. We can think that the most used usage is as follows: "Plátano" is the name for a fruit coming from Musa genre plants, that can be eaten raw. Known as a source of potassium, uses to be sweet. "Banana" is the name for a fruit coming also from Musa genre plants, that must be fried in ...


4

Agronomist here from Costa Rica. We call plátano to the fruit that you need to cook. The cooking is necessary because this fruit had starch, but when is mature some of that starch turns to sugar, so is still sweet, but starchy, so you still can eat it raw. We call banano the fruit you always eat raw, because all the starch is converted in sugar when matures. ...


4

In northern Mexico we say "seguido", it's not grammaticaly correct, but it's used in a day to day manner. Voy seguido al cine => I often go to the movies Seguido me quedo tarde en el trabajo => I often stay late at work "Frecuentemente" is more formal (and correct)


4

The original meaning of link, IIUIC, is each of the rings of a chain. That is Spanish is eslabón. (cf. The missing link / El eslabón perdido). Then, in English, link is also used to mean conection or even relation. That in Spanish would be conexión, enlace or relación. In Internet, link is actually a short form of the original hyperlink (remember that HTTP ...


4

It is likely "vale" (literally "it is worth"), a very common interjection indeed meaning "OK" / "All right".


4

La expresión (grosera) es muy usada actualmente en Argentina, aunque no hace mucho. El origen de estas "malas palabras" frecuentemente es incierto, y creo que este es el caso. La asociación con "recto" me parece muy poco natural, estas palabras no suelen nacer por estos caminos. Más probable (aunque nada conclusiva) me parece la otra explicación que ...


4

I'm from Northern Spain. Here the most common is habitación: ¡Vete a tu habitación! - Go to your bedroom! However, on TV and books, it is probably more usual cuarto: ¡Vete a tu cuarto! Both are used with a posesive, thus tu habitación and tu cuarto means your bedroom or your room. But without the posesive, they may refer to any room, so in these ...



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