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7

In Spain we use "madre" and "padre" when you refer to your parents (or somebody else's parents). Mi padre le ha regalado a mi madre un collar por su cumpleaños. Tu padre está un poco loco Juan. El padre de Luis es muy estricto; La madre un poco menos. We call then "papá" and "mamá" when addressing directly to them or when talking about them ...


4

Awesome is easy to translate. Being more formal and standardized, you can use something like this: Fabuloso Increíble Espectacular Fantástico Sweet instead is a problem because the word itself is a colloquial idiom. I can suggest you ¡Qué bien! but not really much difference with awesome. In my opinion it will depend on the ...


3

According to RAE, vacilar also means: tr. Engañar, tomar el pelo, burlarse o reírse de alguien. So in colloquial talking we would say "vacilar" to kind of cheat someone. I do not recall any other word with the same meaning (maybe "engañar", but it has a bigger and more serious connotation), so this is probably the preferred one. Example Imagine ...


2

I don't kwon if is widely used in Latin America, but you could try with "mola" from the verb molar. This is a colloquialism that could be used in both contexts provided since it not only carries the connotation of Gustar, resultar agradable but also for something to be cool or fascinating. Lets say that in both situations (either receiving my paycheck ...


2

The US spanish has variations. The main ones are Mexican Spanish, and Caribbean Spanish (Cuban, Dominican, Puerto Rican): In Mexico there are some words to adress parents: Mamá and papá (papás for both): These are the main words in every day speech in every place you are, even with your boss at job. Ma and pa (mom and dad): Normal pet term for ...


1

I think the most common terms in the US (although most of my experience is in Mexico) would be «mamá» and «papá», and some slight variations such as «mami» or «papi». But every time I hear the latter I'm reminded of the part of the Will Smith song Miami where they say ¡Ay, papi!


1

Just like @diego said you can use madre and padre when referring to your parents. For example: Mi madre es bonita Mi padre es gordo. Other ways could be "mama" and "papa", "pa" and "ma", and "mamá" and "papá"


1

I would say that vacilar carries a connotation of being somehow aggressively kidding someone, or making fun of, more that with them. I think that the meaning of vacilar is closer to teasing than to kidding. In your example, and this might be due to a regional variation, I would have said "No te preocupes... solo es de vacile!" I mean, you can "vacilar ...



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