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29

It’s a basic rule of Spanish phonotactics. In a nutshell, the structure of a Spanish syllable does not allow it: (C1 (C2)) (S1) V (S2) (C3 (C4)) A Spanish syllable consists of an optional onset, consisting of one or two consonants; a required nucleus, consisting of a vowel optionally preceded by and/or followed by a semivowel; and an optional coda, ...


21

I'm afraid there's no good translation for bug in that sense. If you are a computer expert or you speak English you know the English word. Otherwise you talk about un error, defecto, problema o fallo en el programa o en el sistema.


18

Let's check what RAE says about both of them: For español: español m. Lengua común de España y de muchas naciones de América, hablada también como propia en otras partes del mundo. For castellano castellano m. Lengua española, especialmente cuando se quiere introducir una distinción respecto a otras lenguas habladas también como ...


17

The usual translations are: Girlfriend: Novia Fiancée: Prometida Bride: Novia So the confusion could be about girlfriend and bride. Usually the difference is in the context of the sentence. If the speaker is speaking about a wedding it will refer to a bride (the wedding dress that she wears usually helps :) ). But the article used sometimes ...


16

"Si no" = if + negative Si no coges el paraguas, te mojarás [If you don't take your umbrella with you, you'll get wet] "Sino"= similar to "but" ("instead" in a negative way; "except", "only") No llegan mañana, sino el martes. [They don't arrive tomorrow, but on Tuesday] Este vídeo puede ser de ayuda


14

From the top of my head, the most used one would be izquierda: left There are others, like: zamarra or chamarra: though RAE says zamarra is a sheepskin jacket or similar, in the Basque Country we use it, in Spanish too, to mean overcoat or any coat, really (usually pronounced "chamarra"). zulo: in Basque it literally means "hole", but thanks ...


13

English In this context, the word account could be translated as cuenta. One could use it in expressions such as cuenta de usuario (user account), cuenta de Facebook, cuenta de Google, and cuenta de Twitter. Examples of Usage: Cuentas de Google Twitter en español Español La palabra account en este contexto se traduce como cuenta. Se dice cuenta de ...


13

The distinction is easier to see when you consider things in terms of countability. In this sense, personas is the plural of persona, refers to many people, and can be used when counting. On the other hand gente is a singular noun, refers to a group of people or many people in general and usually isn't used when specifing numbers. Example in terms of ...


13

Almost, but "nacer" is not reflexive, so it's: El bebé debe nacer el cuatro de junio. Also people use "esperar" (expect): Lo esperamos (el bebé) para el cuatro de junio. EDIT: As Laura says, another way is: Mi mujer sale de cuentas el cuatro de junio.


13

There are some clues that help spot words that may be of Arabic origin and there are some lists on the Internet but there's no guaranteed method other than looking up the etymology of each word to know for sure. The biggest clue is words beginning with al- (or ál-), which in Arabic is the definite article "the" / "el" / "la", but generally gets fused into ...


13

A “maría” in Spain is an easy-to-pass subject. The word “maría” in this sense is informal but widely used. The origin of the expression is interesting. In Franco’s times, there were three compulsory subjects common to every University degree: Physical education, Religion and Politics. They were really easy to pass (you had to do almost nothing) and they ...


12

English The difference is not very clear and borders on the idiomatic, but I'd say that cuál implies that there is a known set of options from which to choose, while qué is more general. So ¿Cuál libro prefieres? implies that there are a couple of books in front of you and you need to choose from those. Español La diferencia no está muy clara y ronda ...


12

All of these terms are quite "polite": Excremento Heces (the singular is hez, but it's used in plural for this meaning) Deposición (very formal, used by the medical profession) Deyección (very formal, so much that some people wouldn't know its meaning; used by the medical profession) Defecación (very formal, used in medical environments) Materia fecal ...


12

Yes, they all refer to mythical beings and, AFAIK, most of them have direct spanish translations: Elf: Elfo Dwarf: Enano Goblin: Trasgo (Spain) or Trauco (Chile) Fairy: Hada Pixie: Pixie (consider a kind of fairy) Dragon: Dragón Mermaid: Sirena Unicorn: Unicornio Leprechaun: Duende Centaur: Centauro ...


12

175 most common Spanish words as listed in the book Frecuencias del español: Diccionario de estudios léxicos y morfológicos by Ramón Almela, et al. 200 most frequently occuring Spanish base words in a sample of contemporary news and magazine articles Top 10000 Spanish words from subtitle files A list of resources in print A more detailed research-level ...


12

I will try to make a comprehensive answer on the subject. First of all, Guapa(o), Hermosa(o), Linda(o), Bonita(o), Bella(o) are all synonyms to some extent, so one can be used in the place of the other most of the time. Although some are more appropriate than others depending on context, read further. Second, let's define all of these terms according to ...


12

In Colombia both forms are used about equally. I prefer axila since is a more technical term and sobaco is perhaps used more often when referring to animals. There's a Colombian saying that goes like this: Estoy más pelado que sobaco de rana (I don't have a dime on me.) Again, sobaco is more colloquial and axila is more formal/technical and they refer ...


12

Presilla refers to a buttonhole made with cord. Lazo and lazada refers to a knot. Curva is a curve (no kidding), which can be understood as a loop depending on the context but is very rare. Meandro is each one of the corners that a river forms, as far as I know is never used to refer to a loop. Rizo and bucle are used to describe a loop in the hair. ...


11

All the words you provide might fit at different levels of "beautiful". Personally, I would translate "cute" as "mono" or "rico" (but never as "mono rico"). You can check the first definition of mono and the seventh of rico. They both mean, specially for children, beautiful and funny. EDIT: To make things clearer, I'm from Spain, and I don't know what's ...


11

An example I recently found in Vía Rápida: Cuaderno de ejercicios. In this book, there is a story of a Spanish girl who came to Mexico. Someone told her: Tome asiento. En un ratito viene el profesor. The girl prepared to wait for quite a long time, but then she understood that 'rato' was a different thing in Mexico. The comment from the book: En ...


11

Click the nouns to view the definition on the RAE: Llovizna: the correspondent for "drizzle", a "weak" rain; Aguacero: abundant, sudden rain, that lasts for a short time; Chubasco: like "downpour", same as aguacero and chaparrón; Chaparrón: "tough" rain that lasts for a short time; Diluvio: Very strong rain, or "flood"; See this page on Spanish.about.com ...


11

In some way are synonyms, but catarata is used for big waterfalls. Of course, this is a subjective difference. For a waterfall in a little creek you say cascada for sure, but not catarata. And, for example, the translation of: Niagara Falls → Cataratas del Niágara ¿Son las cataratas del Niágara cascadas? Sí.


11

I (Spaniard guy) would say: This is a very stressful job - Éste es un trabajo muy estresante. I've been really stressed out lately. - He estado muy estresado últimamente. Sample usage (veridical): I've got my mom fed up with my "¡Ay!, ¡No me estreses!" every time she tells me to clean my room. Some other approaches may include: Es un trabajo con mucha ...


11

Para un grupo de soldados en formación, creo que "rompan filas" es una buena opción.


10

From the top of my head, I use here in Spain, quite interchangeably: tazón cuenco bol ponchera UPDATE As per the comments, I've added ponchera to the list. Now, thinking a bit about this, I would say I use bol: as a generic semispheric vessel (any size). ponchera: as a large bowl (a punch-bowl) cuenco: also generic, but smaller ones "tazón" for ...


10

As Randolf Rincón-Fadul says, it depends. Here is a page where it shows some of the possible cases of translating 'to become'. Edit: I found a PDF file titled 23 Ways to Translate Become in Spanish, check it out.


10

YES! I think I first came across this topic on my favourite language blog and then I discovered my favourite word of this type somehow, which is in fact a Spanish word. pelón Here are the key definitions from the online DRAE: 1. adj. Que no tiene pelo o tiene muy poco. U. t. c. s. 4. adj. Ec. Que tiene mucho pelo. And in English without the ...


10

Hoyo: Apertura en el suelo. El golf consiste en meter una pelota en un hoyo. Hueco: Cavidad, espacio libre entre dos o más sólidos. Lo contrario de "macizo". Este ladrillo está hueco y por eso pesa poco. Bache: Un hoyo en una carretera o camino. Este camino está lleno de baches. Agujero: Apertura más o menos redondeada. (En astronomía, ...


10

"Bug" is quite ambiguous in English, because it refers both to the defects in the software as well as to their manifestations that can be seen in the running program. In Spanish we often use "defecto" for software defects, and "fallo" for their manifestations, i.e. software failures.


10

"Joven" (English: "young man/woman") is an okay term for both male and female young adults (around 20-25 years old), as long as you remember to use the correct determinant: "el/un joven" for a young man, and "la/una joven" for a young woman. El joven desea algo para beber. The young man wants something to drink. La joven desea algo para beber. ...



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