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After hearing it in several conversations I figured out that it must mean "beat" or "defeat", hence it was "derrotar".


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In Perú we use it colloquial to express the desire for sharing something. Rota el vaso. Pass the glass (among a group of people using the same glass)


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The verb rotar is always related to the movement which is regularly to roll around one axis. For example rotate an image clockwise or counterwise. According to our Royal Spanish Academy dictionnary it also means to burp but it's not common. There is another sense for rotar in Latin America. It also means to shift work places or to swap tires in the ...


2

In a colloquial context you can also listen to rotar meaning "to wish", at least in Spanish from Spain. For example: Si me rota, lo mismo me pongo a tocar el piano meaning If I wish, I may start playing the piano Apparently, it comes from the Catalan rodar, "2. Donar la gana" -> "Dar la gana" -> "to wish".


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It has to so with circular motion, but also applies to the following examples: rota el cuaderno. rota la tapa de la botella. debes rotarlo para que funcione. Basically, rotar stands also in spanish for giro (turn), so there's no exceptional way to use these verbs whenever you want.


3

"pasar a ser" is used when you specify the previous and the new status (chuckey pasa de ser un muñeco normal a un muñeco asesino) while "convertirse en" is used when the initial status is implicit or unknown (Chuckey se convierte en un muñeco asesino, you may assume that it was a plain doll). Your second phrase is not correct, but I can't tell you why, the ...


1

¿Cómo va? or ¿Cómo te va? are very used in spanish language. Normally there's not big difference between those. The first one is used for people who just are not used to communicate using the proper pronoun As for va, it's commonly used for "progress," cómo te está yendo, cómo te ha ido. here you have a continuous and past participle way to express ...


1

I see no substantial difference. The only stuff I'd add, are the following: Chuky pasa de ser un muñeco normal a un muñeco asesino. Chuky se convierte en un muñeco normal a un muñeco asesino. However, the following sentence exceeds this usage: Chuky pasa de ser un muñeco normal a ser un muñeco asesino. There's no need to use ser twice since you ...


1

¿Cómo vas? Exactly the thing you say. Example: A- Me voy a Colombia B- ¿Cómo vas? A- En avión ¿Cómo te va?/¿Cómo va? You're also on a good trend here. However, it's way more general. I would summarize it uses as 1)"How do you feel (about something that's happening NOW)?" 2)"How do you do?" "What's up?" "How is it hanging?" That's why your doctor ...


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There is no difference in the meaning. The only difference I can think of is user preference. One might think that "convertir" (become/transform) has a more negative connotation than "pasar a ser" (turn into) because one has an active form and the other has a passive form. It would mean that the one who "actively" transforms is worse that the one who is ...


2

The previous one is not exactly the right answer, I'm afraid. Lamento que no haya más galletas (There's no more biscuits left, but I'd like there were :() haya = verb "haber", presente de subjuntivo. Meaning: to remain, to leave, to be. haber is the main verb here, because it doesn't act as an auxiliary verb, but as an "action" verb, with its own ...


10

In this case, haber is not a helping verb, but rather an impersonal verb. You can see this from the fact that haber is not followed by a past participle. Lamento que no haya más galletas vs Lamento que se hayan comido todas las galletas. There, you have your verb, comer, being helped by haber When haber is used impersonally, it expresses the ...


3

When you use the usted form you use the conjugation of the third person, not the second, even if usted is used as a polite version of tú (thus, second person singular) and ustedes as a polite version of vosotros (thus, second person plural). Tú eres / Vosotros sois [Second person] El (o ella) es / Ellos Son [Third person] Usted es / ustedes ...


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Yo soy Tu eres Él es Nosotros somos Ustedes son Ellos son which of these pronouns do you think fit "the boys" best? As to the translation- any dictionary can help you with that.


3

"Clamar" can either be transitive or intransitive, having slightly different meanings, and with each you would use different prepositions. Among these meanings would be: demand, clamor for, complain, call out and cry out (for). The sentence you took as an example could thus have different meanings depending on how we use the prepositions (like contra) or ...


1

A dictionary should help :) As WordReference shows (click on the Collins tab), clamar contra means to protest against, cry out against. Regarding al, "al" + infinitive means "when". Al recordar is somewhat translatable as when remembering. See this answer.



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