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1

I don't know about other languages having the same verb with those two meanings ("to know" and "to taste"). But we might have a similar example with "sentir", which means "to feel" and "to smell" in French and "to feel", "to hear" and "to regret" in Spanish. That said, it might be easier to understand how a verb meaning "to feel" (as was the case with ...


1

Another Spanish native speaker here. To use the verb "quedar", in that context, can be replaced directly for "estar". El restaurante no está muy lejos de aquí. If you have doubts, use the verb "estar", you can't be wrong there. El restaurante no muy lejos de aquí That sounds terrible, like a bad western translation. Of course, people WILL ...


2

Yes, omitting the verb sounds awkward, even if the context is giving you enough information to understand the meaning. Even, by hearing something like this El restaurante no muy lejos de aquí. You couldn't be sure if it means "queda lejos" or "es muy bueno" or "es de comida japonesa". I agree that you can't or shouldn't go with a literal translation, ...


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I'm honestly not entirely sure what your actual confusion is here. First, ir and estar are completely different, and I can't think of any situation that they would be easily confused in beginning Spanish1. In your example, you have El viaje fue interesante. But the present tense form of this is El viaje es interesante. Es comes from ser (to be), ...


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There is no verb "ir" (to go) in these cases. What is confusing, is that both verbs, "ser" and "ir", share the same conjugation —for all the persons— in the "simple perfect preterite", also known as "indefinite preterite". But, in the examples you gave, the "fueron" form belongs only to "ser". You can see the whole conjugation of these verbs in the ...


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I think that the reflexive forms are used only when there's a direct object and you want to add some kind of emphasis. For example: Me comí todo lo que me diste. Me lo comí todo. <- More emphatic and informal, familiar Me comí todo. <- More general, without emphasis, sounds literary Similarly, with beber: ¿Te bebiste lo que había en esta botella? ...



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