Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

When you're speaking about the location where an event takes place then the verb "ser" is the one you have to use: El partido será en el estadio. El partido estará en el estadio.* (Incorrect) El concurso de monólogos es en el pabellón número 5. El concurso de monólogos está en el pabellón número 5.* (Incorrect) if it's not an event (it's ...


14

The examples you wrote about are not phrasal verbs. I don't think there is such a thing as phrasal verbs in Spanish. They are verbs that sometimes change their meaning totally. For example, the verb "to take" means that you grab something with your hands and you lift it up (an example). The verb "to take after" doesn't mean that you grab later, or at least ...


14

Español De hecho, puedes encontrar rastros de ese tipo de coincidencias también en inglés. Un savant es una persona que sabe mucho. A pesar de que es un préstamo del francés, se usa bastante en inglés. Un sage es también una persona sabia, alguien que sabe mucho. Un plato savoury es un plato salado o condimentado, lo cual se refiere al sabor. Los dos ...


13

First of all: the meaning of gustar goes well beyond the romantic interest. This is something you have to bear in mind. If we see the RAE dictionary definition of gustar, we get these meanings (acepciones): tr. Sentir y percibir el sabor de las cosas. tr. experimentar (‖ probar). intr. Agradar, parecer bien. intr. Dicho de una persona: Resultar ...


11

The compound verb "ir a" is roughly the same as "going to" in English: we primarily use it when talking about the immediate future. ¿Va a comprar un coche nuevo? Are you going to buy a new car? (= Have you decided to buy a new car?) Here you can find a detailed analysis of different ways to express the future. They do not elaborate on regional ...


11

Use the pronoun when it clarifies an ambiguity: Leería el libro. This is vague without further context. It could mean "I would read the book" or "He/she would read the book." So the addition of a pronoun (or other context) is necessary. Or use a pronoun for emphasis. Él leyó el libro. Yo leí la revista. "He read the book. I read the ...


11

I think a possible explanation (and how I understand it) is "Está hecho de..." refers to the object being "manufactured with" so the verb refers to the fact that the object was manufactured and "es de madera" refers to the permanent fact that the table is made of wood. Actually you can't say (or is not exactly correct) "el árbol está hecho de madera" "the ...


10

Español Lo he oído explicado así: El pretérito de "ser" viene de la versión del latín de esse, que usa la raíz 'fui'. La historia va de que "ir" es irregular en el sentido de que estaba compuesto de múltiples verbos, y por tanto toma su pretérito del latín "esse". El presente, pretérito, subjuntivo del latín vadere. El infinitivo del latín ire. El ...


10

The difference is simple: Deber + infinitive is used to express obligation: You must do it as soon as possible. Deber de + infinitive is used to express probability or supposition: It must be very early. Sometimes, in the second case the preposition "de" is omitted, so it might be confusing. So the first case could also be interpretated as the ...


9

As Randolf Rincón-Fadul says, it depends. Here is a page where it shows some of the possible cases of translating 'to become'. Edit: I found a PDF file titled 23 Ways to Translate Become in Spanish, check it out.


9

Es un vulgarismo que debe ser evitado: por analogía con el resto de los tiempos verbales (dices, decías, dirás...), a la segunda persona (tú) se le añade como vulgarismo una –s final, y así encontramos el vulgarismo: Tú dijistes* En España, es común encontrar esto en la mitad norte, como dice aquí: En el habla de las tierras donde nació ...


8

In Spanish you use the singular second person to refer to yourself in the imperative way. for Think! you will say ¡Piensa! (or ¡Pensá! in some regions of South America). You cannot say that for the first person, so you always refer to you in the second person for the imperative (I think in English is the same).


8

El niño debe hacer su tarea. This sentence means obligation: The kid must do his job. A similar sentence could be "El niño tiene que hacer su tarea." El niño debe de hacer su tarea. The construction "deber de" means supposition or possibility. I'm not sure this usage applies to your example as is. But another example can be: Deben de ser ...


8

It is a regional variant of "haya" (first and third singular person, subjunctive present of the verb "haber"). You will hear that word from some people with low education in a natural manner, and also from well-educated people in an informal conversation, either trying to make a joke or just put emphasis on the word by pronouncing it incorrectly (especially ...


8

llevar = to take (to go to someplace and carry something with you.) traer = to bring (to come to someplace and carry something with you.) Examples: Llevale estas manzanas a tu abuela. Trae unas cervezas para la fiesta de la noche. As a side note, an interesting thing is that in Japanese the corresponding verbs are made up of two verbs: ...


8

In Spanish the subject is not placed always in front of the verb. So you can say: Me gusta la historia de tu amigo La historia de tu amigo me gusta. or in the past La historia de tu amigo me gustó. Me gustó la historia de tu amigo. and in the four sentences the subject of the sentence is "la historia de tu amigo". Don't get confused ...


8

En esta página, del señor Justo Fernández López dedicada a los verbos pronominales, he encontrado una descripción que me parece apropiada, así que la transcribo aquí: comer – comerse La forma no pronominal comer significa "ingerir alimento", "deglutir un alimento sólido", "tomar la comida". La forma pronominal comerse significa: "omitir ...


8

Las reglas de colocación de clíticos permiten ambas formas. Las dos frases son correctas y perfectamente intercambiables. Mira el punto 3.d del artículo sobre los pronombres personales átonos del Diccionario Panhispánico de Dudas: Como hablante de España, debo decir también que las dos formas no solo son posibles según las reglas gramaticales, sino que ...


8

"Festejar". Translating your example, it would end up being something like: ¡Esta noche quiero festejar! You can also use "Celebrar", which translates to "Celebrate". It depends on the context. For this particular translation, I'd go with "Festejar". EDIT Please note that this answer is not aimed at a particular region, but instead, it's meant to be ...


7

The difference is very clear-cut. You use the preterite for an action that happened at a distinct point in time. So to expand on your examples: Comí tacos ayer. I ate tacos yesterday. Besé a una chica en la fiesta anoche. I kissed a girl at the party last night. These were both specific points in time. The imperfect is used for actions that ...


7

Indeed you can also say the same sentences with the verb "ser" instead of "estar" with a difference in meaning: Él es gordo: he is a fat person. Él está gordo: He is fat right now (he can lose weight in a future or he's fatter than usual). Él es viejo: he is old. Él está viejo: He looks old. El coche es caro: this model of car is expensive (in general). El ...


7

I understand the difficulty. Dar a conocer is actually an idiom or a figure of speech that is always interpreted as To make it known This same figure can also be used as Dar a saber which has the same meaning. So in this case the translation of your passage would be: ... y con un grande alboroto de pitos y timbales daban a conocer los nuevos ...


7

Parar/detener are the most literal translations from stop (although detener also means often to arrest). Dejar is "to leave" in general, only the form "dejar de" is stop (basically it means stop doing a continuous action). Acabar is pretty equivalent to finish (i.e. you can say "acaba tu plato" -> "finish your dish"), suspender matches suspend, impedir is ...


7

In the examples you provide they can all be translated as ha estado or he estado, except the third one: It has been raining a lot recently = Ha estado lloviendo mucho últimamente (or maybe better "ha llovido mucho últimamente") I have been thinking about the exam all week = He estado pensando en el examen toda la semana I have been very busy ...


7

It's a shorten form of "pongamonos a comer". The verb is "poner" in its imperative form: tú: ponte a + infinitive nostros: pongamonos a + infinitive ustedes: ponganse a + infinitive Examples: ¡A trabajar! ¡Ponte a trabajar! ¡Pongamonos a trabajar! RAE defines this use: poner: 41 . prnl. Comenzar a ejecutar una ...


6

The Diccionario panhispánico de dudas explains that there are two major types of voseo: Reverential voseo: archaic and ceremonial usage. Spanish speakers in the Americas are familiar with this type of voseo from historic and religious texts. American dialectal voseo: the different forms of voseo from the Spanish dialects of the Americas. The Diccionario ...


6

They mean almost the same Carecer = Tener falta de algo. Faltar = Consumirse, acabar, fallecer. Now, carecer its used followed by the preposition de so if you want to say (i.e.) I don't have any money, you just say: "carezco de dinero" Saying that is like saying that you don't have it AT ALL. Now, faltar is reflexive: me falta algo ...


6

Como comenta Javi, es un error de la aplicación. Puedes checar en la RAE que las formas correctas son: yo adelgace tú adelgaces él adelgace nosotros adelgacemos vosotros/ustedes adelgacéis / adelgacen ellos adelgacen


6

The correct translation is the one of Google Translate: El hijo del Sol soy yo. Ok, the problem here is the subject and direct complement, they are inverted, the subject is "yo" and the complement is "el hijo del Sol", as you can see in: Componentes funcionales de las oraciones, there are times when the complement is switched to the beginning of the ...


6

This in Spanish is called enantiosemia (from greek "enantíos" contrary and "sema" meaning) also called autoantónimo (from the English autoantonym). Both "rentar" and "alquilar" have this property. Se llama enantiosemia a un tipo de polisemia en el que una palabra tiene dos sentidos opuestos. La oposición entre los significados puede ser de distintos ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible