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0

The most appropriate adjective is "estremecedora" because it meets all the characteristics of the adjective "haunting". Meaning of "estremecedora": to remove (something like a tremor) something inside someone deeply. In this context "melodía estremecedora" gives way to be something beautiful, something enthralling and somber / sad. Explain the differences ...


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It depends about the context: Answer to an explanation: I got you! = Formal way: Lo entiendo, entendido, te he entendido. Spanish slang: te pillo, te cojo (DO NOT use this last one in LATAM!) If you save somebody that is about to hit the floor: I got you! = Te tengo!


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It seems that the places receives than name for two sculptures of dogs that were brought from New York and placed on the upper part of the house (terrace). In order to keep the meaning of the place the proper translation seems to be "(The) House of the Dogs", as can be seen in that wikipedia entry (I checked what "Casa de los Perros" was and after learning ...


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Just as alternative to what the OP asked, another meaning for "I got you" is "I understand you". So you can say "Te entiendo".


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As a Mexican I would say: Ándele! or Tómala!


-3

What about "golpeé a ti!" (I hit you!)


2

Dominar or domino works really well. When I was living in the Dominican Republic that's the word they used.


2

Fijémonos Comes from the verb fijarse It like saying, Let's now focus on ... [something else]


1

Sometimes it's used with question tune (¿Hola, hola?) to try to attract the attention of anyone who's distracted. A single ¿Hola? is also used to this.


6

A mi me recuerda a Bugs Bunny de los "Looney Tones", que decía "Hola, hola amigos". Realmente no simboliza impaciencia. Es una redundancia sin ningún significado, al menos en España. No estoy seguro en Latinoamérica.


1

You could be perceived as over polite by saying Hola. Buenos días since it is a little bit redundant, but your listener but be also nitpicking to address you as such... While "hola hola" is redundant, you can't rush someone with a "hi", so won't be perceived as a sign of impatience. As @Zukki points out, would be perceived as overenthusiastic. If ...


4

Tesoro is a generic name some authors give to their dictionaries (of any kind). For instance, Covarrubias's Tesoro de la Lengua Castellana is a traditional (with definitions) dictionary. Tesoro isn't necessarily a specific kind of dictionary. What in English is called “thesaurus”, in Spanish is called diccionario de sinónimos (y antónimos). All specialized ...


2

I think that Spanish for "Thesaurus" is "Tesauro", so the proper translation would be Un tesauro es un tesoro. Wikipedia, says that the word Proviene del latín thesaurus (‘tesoro’), y este a su vez del griego clásico thesauros (θησαυρός, ‘almacén’, ‘tesorería’) but the way to refer to this kind of dictionary of synonyms and antonyms is tesauro ...


2

When someone says claro, it may not be clear weather is claro que si or claro que no. For example: - ¿Crees que debo comprar estos zapatos? + Claro! (Implied) Very different from: + Claro que no, no son tu talla. or + Claro que si, son perfectos para ti! (Clear Statements)


5

Claro has the same meaning as Por supuesto. Claro can mean either Claro que sí or Claro que no, so the is no difference between claro and claro que sí, expect that one is shorthand for the other. None is more emphatic than the other, because with Claro you are assuming that the listener know through the context if you mean "que sí" or "que no". Claro, as a ...


1

Tener To have something. To possess something, a feeling, etc. Tengo dos gatos Tengo tres dólares en mi mano Tenemos miedo de tí Él tiene frío Haber To have existence. To be obliged to do something. To have had done something. Hay dos camas en el cuarto Ya lo he visto Hay que hacer ejercicios. It is mainly used in ...


3

Yes, you include "Today", and refer to the same day next week. If today is Monday then: Today:1 Tuesday:2 Wednesday:3 Thursday:4 Friday:5 Saturday:6 Sunday:7 Monday:8 This is very common in Spanish, and also interchangeable for 7 days. Everyone will know you meant next week. Mathematically speaking it would be 7 days, since from today to next week ...


2

"Lo que" indeed means "what", not in the interrogative sense, but in the sense of "that which..." Consider the following examples: Lo que importa es... / What matters is... Lo que me molesta es que ... / What bothers me is that... ¿Oíste lo que dijo? / Did you hear what s/he said? Haz lo que quieras. / Do whatever you want. Pase lo ...


2

In this case, there are two rules to combine: Always write a comma before an adversative conjunction (such as pero) All constructions meaning of course (such as por supuesto, naturalmente, desde luego...) must be surrounded by commas You put these two norms together and get the correct punctuation, which is the one you write in your question: ...


10

El caldo es lo que obtienes al hervir algún alimento, comúnmente pollo, verduras, etc; la sopa tiene por lo general al caldo como ingrediente, y en su forma más básica es sólo un caldo con algún agregado, generalmente pan, sémola o fideos, aunque pueden ser mucho más complejas. También hay algunos platos a los que se llama caldos aunque estrictamente ...


5

Para evitar la repetición de sonidos similares, es preferible usar 50 y 60 ml. Es lo mismo que hacemos con el sufijo mente cuando usamos varios adverbios Lo explicó clara y rápidamente (y no, "lo explicó claramente y rápidamente") Aparte, si la conjunción es disyuntiva Poner 1 ó 2 cucharadas de azúcar se sigue la misma regla, y se solía ...



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