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1

The common theme of "bomba" seems to be somrthing that "explodes," or "sprays." That is certainly true of "bomb." But in can also apply to a "pump" that "sprays.' Fire trucks and stations are the "homes" of these pumps that spray, and firemen are called "bomberos" in Spanish. This meaning could be figuratively true of "news," or "bubbles."


0

It's a word only found in books and cartoons. Her's an example in "Alice in Wonderland": -Oye ven, ¿Por dónde está la reina? -A veces por aquí y a veces por acá. Pero como yo soy gente importante siempre entro por acullá.


2

Spanish has six demonstrative adverbs. In order from nearest to farthest, they are aquí, acá, ahí, allí, allá, acullá. English has just three: here, there, yonder. That's why it translated it as yonder, as they are both the farthest from the speaker (incidentally, being from the [US] South, I use yonder in regular speech and so while allí sits on a grey ...



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