Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

Una opción que no suena tan negativa es introducir la "noticia" directamente con una frase, por ejemplo: No ha sido posible blah blah blah, porque bleh bleh bleh. Lamento comunicarles que blah blah blah, porque bleh bleh bleh. Ello, dado que los sinónimos de desafortunado tienen todos, como es de esperarse, una connotación negativa.


2

I researched the origin of the word "gringo" when I was in graduate school after one of my professors offered the silly "green-go" myth as the explanation. The term has clearly been in use for centuries to describe non-Spanish people. The most widely accepted theory among etymologists was that the word was derived from "griego," the Spanish word for Greek. ...


2

If you use de in the sentence above, wouldn't it change the meaning to: You have one minute of choice It doesn't make much scene, but consider this: Tienes un minuto de paz / You have one minute of peace Here para is used to denote purpose, destination or need, while de is used to indicate possession. I think this difference can also be clearly seen ...


1

It's a peculiarity of the English language that you have 40 minutes for lunch, but 40 minutes to eat it. In Spanish we use for (para) always, that's all. 40 minutos para el almuerzo y 40 minutos para comerlo.


1

I agree that it depends a lot on the country and even region. In some places I have seen "cariño" used among close frinds, mostly women. Also I have it seen used to mark distance (a superior woman calling an inferior "cariño" as a sign of superiority like the one has over her children).


1

It depends highly on Country (e.g. in Chile it would be acceptable, in Argentina the word is not very much used in this sense) Socioeconomic level (amongst high-middle class it would be acceptable) Sexism awareness So I'd ask directly if the use would be OK among your group.


1

As others have said, this is not a commonly spoken word, but is found mostly in poetry and writing, perhaps especially used in folk and children tales. I would use "acá y acullá" as the equivalent of "hither and yon". As an aside, The RAE defines "acullá" as adv. l. A la parte opuesta de quien habla. U. en contraposición a adverbios demostrativos de ...


1

I noticed my mothers family in El Salvador uses Vos excessively. My Salvadoran family here in the States uses vos and tu equally. I think tu might be a bit more formal. Whenever they're joking about they tend to use vos more. My Mexican family doesn't use vos at all. I once traveled from El Salvador to Mexico (I picked up the Salvadoran accent and dialect) ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible