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7

The problem is that gustar is an inverted verb, compared to English. For example: I like the food. Me gusta la comida. In Spanish the subject is "comida", while "me" is the indirect complement, while in English, "I" is the subject and "food" is the complement. So you have to use the third person imperative, and that is constructed using the ...


5

I think you are confused because you are mixing two completely unrelated concepts. The concept of "bad words" or vulgarities is a social concept, which varies greatly from region to region, and can often be influenced by local laws (i.e. certain English words cannot be said on broadcast television or radio in the US). This is true in any language. The ...


3

Gustar can be used in the imperative, but will normally be understand as to try / taste something (its transitive meaning is experimentar, percibir el sabor, etc). For example, the Argentinian Alfonsina Storni once wrote Corre, camina, gira, sube y vuela: Gústalo todo porque todo es bello However, because the literal meaning of intransitive gustar is ...


2

I don't believe I've used them, or heard them, before today. I inquired my coworkers on them, and their answers essentially match the connotations other answers have given you, so far. What I would add is that both are phrases you would only use with those close to you, and that the fact that they rely on 'bad words' doesn't change the nature of such words ...


1

Sólo tengo que decir que sí: Gústete la comida. Está mal y: Te tiene que gustar la comida. Transmite correctamente el mensaje y por consiguiente es la mejor traducción. Es la que yo usaría. Te necesita gustar la comida. Está mal porque ni siquiera es correcto gramaticalmente. No veo otra opción mas que la anterior. Saludos.


1

Just to add more info to your question. You can find that, in different places, and depending on the situation and to who are you talking, bad expressions could be pretty well received. For example, on the north of Spain it's not uncommon to hear friends referring themselves with expressions like: "Ven aquí, cabronazo" -- Come here, bastard or "Serás ...


1

You have come across two different examples here. "Mucha mierda" is slang for Theatre people. There is superstition among them that it is actually bad luck to wish "Good luck" to someone, which would be "Mucha suerte" in spanish. So, to avoid saying "Mucha suerte" they have come to "Mucha mierda" as a substitute, as it is, on first sight, exactly the ...


1

You are using "good" and "bad" in two different ways here. The words you present are offensive to some people, regardless of whether or not the opinion conveyed is positive or negative. The degree to which listeners will be offended depends on the country, the social class, and whole lot of other factors. Learning when to be "socially correct" and when ...



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