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1

This is a derivation from english Water-closet that have been incorporated into Spanish. http://lema.rae.es/drae/?val=v%C3%A1ter Although the correct accepted word is váter (so the correct translation would be váter), the commmon use on the date the book was translated was water.


1

It is an odd translation, I grew up in Mexico and reside in the US and had never heard or read this word until now, tho as @guifa indicates if I where reading the book (in spanish) I would question it's meaning but wouldn't think of "agua". So my guess is the edition you are reading is meant for distribution in certain countries. What I found is that "Wáter" ...


1

As you point out in your update, it's actually the word toilet that's being translated as wáter. Trust me when I say it doesn't sound weird to natives (unless they use inodoro or some other term instead). It's been fully incorporated into the language and so beyond perhaps connecting it to the British term watercloset, I can promise you no native speaker ...


1

Here's everything presented in a table (/χ/ may be realized as /x/ or /h/ depending on dialect). ╭─────╥───────┬───────┬───────┬───────┬───────╮ │ ║ A │ E │ I │ O │ U │ ╞═════╬═══════╪═══════╪═══════╪═══════╪═══════╡ │ J ║ χa | χe | χi | χo | χu | │ G ║ ga | χe | χi | go | gu | │ GU ║ gwa | ge ...


1

Maybe, the translator really don't care about blasphemy, only that, in spanish a literal translation don´t make sense at all


1

Hoy mismo ha aparecido en la página de la Fundéu un artículo al respecto. Además de los miembros de casas reales, se hispanizan los nombres de los papas, aunque esto último es habitual en casi todos los idiomas del mundo.


2

This seems to be very regional. The place is called gomería in Argentina, as the tires are sometimes referred to as gomas, a term which, by the way, can also refer to a woman's breasts, so you can call them neumáticos instead if you want (that is the more technical term, which you'd use to buy them online, for example) ¿Dónde hay una gomería? Would be ...


5

I think it's not a matter of blasphemy, it's just that idiom is not direclty translatable to Spanish.


1

En Colombia decimos «juegos pirotécnicos» o simplemente «pirotécnicos». En Wikipedia aparecen otras opciones como «fuegos artificiales» y «fuegos de artificio».


4

"Mariposa de la luz" is not a standard spanish phrase, but the language (any language) is short on words to define all kinds of insects, so you need to abide by the meaning, instead of the word-by-word translation. A "lamp bug" is a bug that is attracted by the light of a lamp. This can only happen during night, since during day that light is not important ...


4

The animal called in english as "gopher" is called in spanish tuzas, taltuzas o ratas de abazones. You can check Wikipedia and read this: Gophers are endemic to North and Central America. So no, there are no gophers in Spain, nor in most of latin America. This is why the translator chose a better known animal, the well known squirrel we all ...


1

Aquí en Chile, se dice fuegos artificiales, y al referirse al espectáculo donde los tiran, espectáculo de pirotecnia.


2

Here, in Chile, we say: ¿Dónde se arreglan neumáticos? or ¿Dónde se arreglan ruedas? The place is called taller de neumáticos.


6

La expresión procede, en efecto, de fórmulas corteses o formales. Por ejemplo, respondiendo a una pregunta: ¿Es usted Pedro Pérez? Para servirle [o Para servirle a usted; similar al inglés at your service]. En la antefirma de una carta: Su seguro servidor [equivalente al inglés yours truly o incluso your humble servant] Y, finalmente, al ...


3

No sé de donde viene esta expresión, pero posiblemente viene de la biblia. Hay muchos casos, sobretodo en el antiguo testamento, donde alguien se refiere a si mismo como "su siervo". "Su servidor" puede ser una variante. Un ejemplo: Josué 5:14 Reina-Valera 1960 (RVR1960) 14 El respondió: No; mas como Príncipe del ejército de Jehová he venido ...


3

Uso: Se usa referido al mismo que habla, en expresiones de humildad: ‘Aquí tiene un servidor para cualquier cosa que se le ofrezca. Téngame por su humilde servidor’. Use: Is used to refer the same that speaks, in terms of humility: There is no equivalence in English. Note: Yours truly is the closest match but only in letters. Not like un servidor ...


1

"Un servidor" meaning that person is here for help or assist you in whatever thing you need. For example when you make a phone call and ask for Juan Perez, the other person says Soy yo un servidor, reference to What can I help you. Cuando una persona se llama asimismo Un servidor, hacer referencia a que esta allí para ayudarlo en lo que necesite. Ya ...


2

In northern Mexico (Specifically Chihuahua), the usual way to call tire repairing places is desponchado (if you look it up in google, most results you'll find are from Chihuahua), however vulcanizadora would be understood as well (but it's not very used).


0

One more meaning with similar roots I think: Arroz bomba A variety of short grained rice grown in Spain with particular usage in paella making. It has a structure that allows it to swell up without bursting during the cooking process.


0

Checking an ethimological dictionary, it seems the word 'bomba' comes from the French word 'bombe', which comes from the Italian 'bomba' and the original latin word, 'bombus' (which probably comes from the Greek 'bombos' The original meaning was 'a deep and intense loud sound'. So, that's the origin of the bomb meaning of the word. The other meanings ...


2

The R.A.E definition of 'contener' is, among others, tr. Dicho de una cosa: Llevar o encerrar dentro de sí a otra. U. t. c. prnl. which roughly translates to: to have something inside something else. So, if I had to make an educated guess, I'd say he's asking about some connotation or secret meaning the word has. To be honest, it's not something you'd ...


1

El primo de mi mujer estuvo alli y lo paso fatal. - My wife's cousin was there and had a terrible time. The closest Spanish equivalent for 'gave him hell' would be 'le hicieron la vida un infierno' or 'le hicieron la vida imposible'.


1

"They gave him hell" could mean that the treatment he got from the people there was cruel or harsh and far from respectful. I agree that it's important to get those clueless people into the translation, but also to do it with a colloquialism, preferably something a bit of a rough edge. "Lo trataron retemal" or "Se le amontaron líos" might approach that.


1

Also, "Gracias por la confirmación" When you refer to a letter.


3

Technically, yes, in the past it should gracias por haber confirmado, but that doesn't mean you won't hear gracias por confirmar with high frequency with that meaning. For another example, you'll hear gracias por venir all the time, even though, presumably, if they've already arrived at your house/party/event/place/shindig, you're thanking them for having ...


3

In some places you said: Vulcanizadora ¿Dónde está la vulcanizadora? Or ¿Dónde puedo reparar la llanta del auto? All people will understand the second one.


7

First, as you can see in the Real Academia Española's dictionary, "fulana" also means prostitute. This novel was pusblished at the end of Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and just a year after the 1938 Press Law, that was adopted mainly to control the republican press. With this law a period of heavy state censorship began, and this could be the cause of a ...


1

Acá en Argentina a los que se ven en el cielo tipo lluvia de luces que explotan se le dice "fuego artificiales". A los que solamente explotan en el piso se le dice "petardos". A los que son tipo palo que salen para arriba volando y explotan se le dice "canita voladora". Todo esto también se lo considera "cohete". Vamos a tirar cohetes


4

I use neumático personally (Spain Spanish) and along with llanta those two are the most common words. According to the Wiki article on neumático, you'll also hear cubierta, goma, or caucho in other countries, but it does point out that llanta is the most common in Central America. Taller mecánico to me is pretty much exclusively automotive-type repair ...


2

En Cuba nosotros llamamos a ese lugar para arreglar las gomas o llantas cuando se pinchan o ponchan: Ponchera Y por lo general es entendido en todos lados, por lo menos en Colombia, Mexico y Miami me han entendido. Podrías decir: ¿Dónde queda/está la ponchera más cercana? http://hialeah.olx.com/vendo-ponchera-y-taller-de-mecanica-iid-198691856


1

The common theme of "bomba" seems to be somrthing that "explodes," or "sprays." That is certainly true of "bomb." But in can also apply to a "pump" that "sprays.' Fire trucks and stations are the "homes" of these pumps that spray, and firemen are called "bomberos" in Spanish. This meaning could be figuratively true of "news," or "bubbles."


1

To "salir" is to "go out." When used to described the movements of the sun, the analogy is that the sun is "going out" of the ground or earth, into the sky. It's just a matter of idiom: In English, we say that the sun is "rising" in the sky. In Spanish, we say the sun is "going out," relative to the ground.


7

It will be translated as "cincuenta a sesenta". The speaker can use the preposition ("a") to express the range of a quantity. A dash ("Guión Ortográfico") between two words is used to create a compound word. Example: físico-química = physicochemical Traduction of your Example: I see fifty-sixty cars go by here everyday => Veo cincuenta a sesenta carros ...


2

En Mexico(El DF) es mas común escuchar cuetes para decir fuegos artificiales. Aunque en si la palabra quiere decir un fuego artificial mas chiquito la usan como termino por todos. Ten cuidado no confundirla con cuates que es como amigos o compadres. También hay un dicho que me gusta mucho Tiene cuetes en la cola - tiene hormigas en el culo - he has ants ...


1

La traducción adecuada sería "Fuegos artificiales" tal como se comentaba, sin carácter técnico, es de lenguaje común. Por otro lado, no se puede usar "petardos" para traducir "Fireworks" porque son dos conceptos diferentes, en el primer caso nos referimos a artefactos 'de mano' y en el segundo hablamos de artefactos que tienen la capacidad de auto ...


1

Es más común emplear la palabra petardo que en ingles es firecracker, aceptada por la RAE, también usada en Francés y Catalán que se escriben casi igual pétard/petard creado a partir del del verbo 'petar' ( estallar, ventosear). En el día a día y en uso familiar, especialmente en San Juan se suele usar petardo. No llamaría fuego artificial a un petardo como ...


10

Aquí, en España, usamos "Fuegos artificiales", sin que suene especialmente técnico. En tono coloquial, si está claro el contexto, tambien se dice a veces "los fuegos": ¡Vamos a ver los fuegos! ¡Vamos a ver los fuegos artificiales! La palabra "pirotecnia" y derivados no se usa en el habla coloquial.


1

In spanish the word "salida" means both "exit" (in general) and "start" (of a race, course or circuit). So, when the judge fires the gun and all the athletes start running 100m, it is "la salida" of the race. In a bicycle race, bikers go from "la salida" to "la meta". Think on it like the runners, or the sun, is going out from some place: out from the ...


2

Because there are another words that can be used, and less used by people I copy two paragraphs from Ministerio de Fomento: Orto (salida) del Sol Denominamos orto o salida del sol al instante que corresponde a la aparición del borde superior del Sol en un horizonte(*) hipotético en que no se considera el relieve del horizonte real, ni obstáculos ...


2

Yes, "Salida" mean "Exit" but "Salida" here is like "The comming out", for example "La salida es el viernes por la mañana" it's "The trip is on friday morning" because in a trip we are going out somewhere. So, here the sun is comming out of where is hidden. In spanish we cans ay that the sun "Sale en la mañana" in the rise and "se mete" or "se oculta en la ...


5

Simple answer Because that's how the original prayer was translated to Spanish. In English, the same prayer is translated "Hail Mary, full of grace", hence the English translation matching the common English prayer. Longer answer (regarding the syntax) Modern Spanish generally uses what's called a SVO structure (subject-verb-object), and more ...


2

Más o menos means at least two different things in Spanish. When it is used as a synonym of "aproximadamente" ("approximately"), "more or less" is a fine English translation. For instance, "está a más o menos cinco kilómetros de aquí" can be translated as "it's more or less five kilometers from here." However, when it is used to mean "no tan bien," more or ...


2

I agree with Jaime as the translation would be a much closer reference to "El primo de mi mujer estuvo en McAlester y lo trataron muy mal" and I'd also say that the use of the word "fatal" may not always be linked to death, it can be linked to bad luck, misfortune or any general shock that may occur. The statement in question "Lo paso fatal" would be best ...


1

It's The "Hail Mary" Dios te salve María, llena eres de gracia, el Señor es contigo, bendita tú eres entre todas la mujeres y bendito es el fruto de tu vientre, Jesús. Santa María, madre de Dios, ruega por nosotros pecadores, ahora y en la hora de nuestra muerte Amén.


2

Actually "Maria llena eres de gracia" it's a part of a prayer dedicated towards Mother Mary called "Ave María" or "Hail Mary". "Dios te salve María llena eres de gracia el Señor es contigo; bendita tú eres entre todas las mujeres, y bendito es el fruto de tu vientre, Jesús. Santa María, Madre de Dios, ruega por nosotros pecadores, ahora y en la hora de ...


4

First, I have no idea what "The cat croaked" means haha[I have my theories]. Second, "fatal" in spanish it is not only related to death, here "lo pasó fatal" just means that "he spent that time in a very terrible way". It's a good translation, it seems to me that it's from Spain. I agree with Eleyson that "El primo de mi mujer estuvo en McAlester y lo ...


4

It depends, I'm from Argentina and we don't use that expression, though it's correct. Personally I would go for a more universal translation such as "El primo de mi mujer estuvo en McAlester y lo trataron muy mal". I'm not sure about the context of the sentence, but the difference between what I wrote and the translation you found is that mine conveys the ...


0

La mejor traducción es "more or less". La expresión se dice con frecuencia en Inglés.


1

Yes. In English, the word "film" may mean a thin layer covering a surface (such as "a film or dust") or movie. Similarly, in Spanish, the word "pelicula" may mean a thin layer covering a surface (as in "una película de polvo") or movie.


1

The spanish word 'película' means any thin coating or thin layer. So, as in english a celluloid film is the transparent layer used to record a movie (in its original form), in spanish the word 'película' was used for "movie" by metonymy from "film". But the original meaning "film" is in perfect usage, like in this 'película de polvo'. See also 'película de ...



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