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This is a derivation from english Water-closet that have been incorporated into Spanish. http://lema.rae.es/drae/?val=v%C3%A1ter Although the correct accepted word is váter (so the correct translation would be váter), the commmon use on the date the book was translated was water.


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It is an odd translation, I grew up in Mexico and reside in the US and had never heard or read this word until now, tho as @guifa indicates if I where reading the book (in spanish) I would question it's meaning but wouldn't think of "agua". So my guess is the edition you are reading is meant for distribution in certain countries. What I found is that "Wáter" ...


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As you point out in your update, it's actually the word toilet that's being translated as wáter. Trust me when I say it doesn't sound weird to natives (unless they use inodoro or some other term instead). It's been fully incorporated into the language and so beyond perhaps connecting it to the British term watercloset, I can promise you no native speaker ...


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Here's everything presented in a table (/χ/ may be realized as /x/ or /h/ depending on dialect). ╭─────╥───────┬───────┬───────┬───────┬───────╮ │ ║ A │ E │ I │ O │ U │ ╞═════╬═══════╪═══════╪═══════╪═══════╪═══════╡ │ J ║ χa | χe | χi | χo | χu | │ G ║ ga | χe | χi | go | gu | │ GU ║ gwa | ge ...


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Maybe, the translator really don't care about blasphemy, only that, in spanish a literal translation don´t make sense at all



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