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11

After some searching in old Google books, I came to the conclusion that bazer is in fact a typical OCR error when scanning hazer, which is an old form of hacer: to do/to make. See for instance the following screenshot of a Google book where I searched for bazer and all instances of hazer are highlighted: For the rest of the sentence it would be better if ...


7

You are looking for durante los últimos X años a lo largo de los últimos X años en los últimos X años Your example would be: Su negocio adquirió varios ordenadores durante los últimos dos años.


6

Aquí, en España, usamos "Fuegos artificiales", sin que suene especialmente técnico. En tono coloquial, si está claro el contexto, tambien se dice a veces "los fuegos": ¡Vamos a ver los fuegos! ¡Vamos a ver los fuegos artificiales! La palabra "pirotecnia" y derivados no se usa en el habla coloquial.


6

I'm from the north of Spain. The most usual translations here for What the hell and derivatives could be: ¿Qué cojones? ¡Pero qué cojones! ¿Qué coño? ¡Pero qué coño! ¿Qué mierda? ¡Pero qué mierda! ¿Qué puta mierda? ¡Pero qué puta mierda! Usually the expressions starting with "Pero" are used as an exclamation, while the expressions without it usually ...


6

In Spanish we have two words: pastel and tarta. There is not an exact correspondence between the English words pie and cake and these two. For instance, an apple pie would be tarta de manzana, but a meat pie would be pastel de carne. So your translation might be correct or not depending on the kind of pie.


5

It will be translated as "cincuenta o sesenta" or "cincuenta, sesenta". The speaker can use the suffix ("o") or a comma to concatenate the range of a quantity. A dash ("Guión Ortográfico") between two words is used to create a compound word. Example: físico-química = physicochemical Traduction of your Example: -I see fifty-sixty cars go by here everyday. ...


5

Simple answer Because that's how the original prayer was translated to Spanish. In English, the same prayer is translated "Hail Mary, full of grace", hence the English translation matching the common English prayer. Longer answer (regarding the syntax) Modern Spanish generally uses what's called a SVO structure (subject-verb-object), and more ...


5

The phrase which you are looking for, "film of dust," can use both "película" AND "capa," the latter being the better choice. It refers to a light coating of dust on something (remember that The Grapes of Wrath is set during the Dust Bowl). Thus, one rendering in Spanish of "film of dust" would be "una capa de polvo." Todo estaba cubierto por una ligera ...


4

First, I have no idea what "The cat croaked" means haha[I have my theories]. Second, "fatal" in spanish it is not only related to death, here "lo pasó fatal" just means that "he spent that time in a very terrible way". It's a good translation, it seems to me that it's from Spain. I agree with Eleyson that "El primo de mi mujer estuvo en McAlester y lo ...


4

At least in Chile, no matter what means pase lo que pase, o suceda lo que suceda (this one less common). I don't know what do Mexicans prefer. @itziki is right, but both options are OK: Pase lo que pase, no vayas a faltar a la junta. and Pase lo que pase, no faltes a la junta. The second one sounds prettier, though ^_^


4

Only the first is correct: A lo largo de la entrevista. Another option would be: Durante la entrevista.


4

I checked your table, and what I can find is BOTH, Google and Bing are giving you unnatural (and some times wrong) translations most of the time. However Google's translations seem to be much more accurate than Bing's ones. I speak spanish from Mexico.


3

You can say antiguamente too. I don't know which translation is more likely to be used by a Mexican, because I'm Chilean... Antiguamente, el trigo valía 100 dólares la tonelada.


3

It would be better to know a little bit more about the English phrase you want to translate. "Pase lo que pase" translates to "no matter what (and an implied happens)". But the translation is dependent on the verb and the interrogative word (5 W's & H). No matter who says it = Lo diga quien lo diga... No matter what you believe = Creas lo que ...


3

Maybe, in Spanish you could say: Hace tiempo el trigo valía cien dólares por tonelada Tiempo atrás, el trigo valía cien dólares la tonelada So, "back in the day" could be translated to: Hace tiempo [better] Or Tiempo atrás


3

I Mexico we say: ¡Qué chingados! ¡Pero qué chingados! ¡Qué mierda! ¡Pero qué mierda! ¡Qué pedo! ¡Pero qué pedo! ¡Qué puta madre! ¡Pero qué puta madre! Sometimes "chingados" is spelled and/or pronounced as "chingaos."


3

-The first one is correct but I think "Ya era demasiado tarde" sounds better. -The second one is fine but I would prefer "Se estaba haciendo tarde" o "Ya se estaba haciendo tarde".


3

"More or less" is perfectly acceptable and normal English. You'll also hear "give or take," "just about" or "plus or minus (a quantitifier)" with quantities, or "pretty much" when speaking of things that are qualitatively similar.


3

In Texas I hear "frasco" mostly for this type of container. "Lata," to my knowledge, is always made of some type of metal. One can put almost anything inside a "frasco."


2

It depends, I'm from Argentina and we don't use that expression, though it's correct. Personally I would go for a more universal translation such as "El primo de mi mujer estuvo en McAlester y lo trataron muy mal". I'm not sure about the context of the sentence, but the difference between what I wrote and the translation you found is that mine conveys the ...


2

Durante los dos años pasados which really translates to During the past two years. but I believe that it's the closest you're going to get.


2

I isn't the exact translation, but a good equivalent could be Érase una vez ... It's usually used in the beginning of a fairy tale though, which is why most people will probably downvote this. If you want to get literal in your translation, you could say Durante los antiguos tiempos .... Which is more equivalent to Back in the old days To ...


2

In this case, the a before the DO is not mandatory, so you can say: Juan envía su hija a su madre. RAE's Diccionario panhispánico de dudas, under its entry 1. a + complemento directo. lists a detailed set of rules to establish when a DO must (uso forzoso), may (doble uso), or can't (no se usa) be preceded by a. In this case it says that the a before su ...


2

Actually "Maria llena eres de gracia" it's a part of a prayer dedicated towards Mother Mary called "Ave María" or "Hail Mary". "Dios te salve María llena eres de gracia el Señor es contigo; bendita tú eres entre todas las mujeres, y bendito es el fruto de tu vientre, Jesús. Santa María, Madre de Dios, ruega por nosotros pecadores, ahora y en la hora de ...


2

I agree with Jaime as the translation would be a much closer reference to "El primo de mi mujer estuvo en McAlester y lo trataron muy mal" and I'd also say that the use of the word "fatal" may not always be linked to death, it can be linked to bad luck, misfortune or any general shock that may occur. The statement in question "Lo paso fatal" would be best ...


2

Because there are another words that can be used, and less used by people I copy two paragraphs from Ministerio de Fomento: Orto (salida) del Sol Denominamos orto o salida del sol al instante que corresponde a la aparición del borde superior del Sol en un horizonte(*) hipotético en que no se considera el relieve del horizonte real, ni obstáculos ...


2

Yes, "Salida" mean "Exit" but "Salida" here is like "The comming out", for example "La salida es el viernes por la mañana" it's "The trip is on friday morning" because in a trip we are going out somewhere. So, here the sun is comming out of where is hidden. In spanish we cans ay that the sun "Sale en la mañana" in the rise and "se mete" or "se oculta en la ...


2

I live in Mexico, and we always say caballito to refer both to the glass itself and the amount of drink. I've never heard shot used in Spanish, but then I'd only know about Mexico...


2

I lived in Paraguay for a couple years, and down there the common phase for "No matter what" was: "Sí o sí" (meaning directly, "Yes or yes"). This was used in sentences to demonstrate the imperativeness of an action. For example: "You need to go to the the meeting, no matter what." --> "Necesitas asistir a la reunión, sí o sí."


2

Yes it is. It means both movie and coating. Vamos a ver una película - Let's watch a movie.



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