New answers tagged

0

Las claves para ver un partido de fútbol con los amigos.


1

Translating from English is not that easy since we mostly invoke the subjunctive mood mostly everytime. El equipo empezó a ponerse triste después de que les anotaran. ... a entristecerse después de que les anotaran. Often, get + adjective invokes ponerse + adjetivo. Note if we don't consider it a hypothetical situation, we use the indicative ...


0

There could be several translations. Here some alternatives. El equipo comenzó a estar/ponerse triste después de que les anotaran La moral del equipo bajó después de que les anotaran.


0

I would say, "Él es un bastante buen esquiador, pero no muy bueno." A literal translation would be: He is a "pretty good" skier but not "great."


2

Algunas alternativas: Él es un buen esquiador, pero no tan bueno. Él es buen esquiador, pero no tanto. Es buen esquiador, pero le falta. Si quieres incluir en la misma frase la parte referente a la gran montaña puedes usar: Él es buen esquiador pero no tan bueno como para esquiar en una gran montaña. Es buen esquiador pero no tanto ...


1

In Colombia "taking it easy" and "just chilling", both expressions mean the same: Aquí, pasandola. Nada, fresco,... Todo bien... Nada hermano, pasándola ... Gozándola Examples: A - ¿Qué haces? B - Aquí pasándola... A - ¿Cómo estás? B - Bien, fresco, todo bien. A - ¿Cómo estás? B - Bien, aquí gozándola... ...


5

You can say tomárselo con calma/ tranquilidad, although it generally refers to how you embark on a new project or face a task: I have to write a paper, but since the deadline is in two weeks I'm taking it easy = Tengo que redactar un trabajo, pero como la fecha de entrega es en dos semanas me lo voy a tomar con tranquilidad. [More examples here] ...


2

Caminaré = I will walk (at some unspecified time in the future, a prediction) Camino mañana = I will walk tomorrow (the present tense is used when the time is made explicit: Te llamo esta noche = I will call you tonight.) N.B. The future in Spanish, unlike English, is often used to express conjecture or probablity: ¿Dónde estará mi hermano? = I ...


2

This is a question primarily about verb tenses, so let's see what we have, only in those cases where there have been any trouble (with the tense by its Spanish name): Tiempo pasado imperfecto (modo indicativo): I walked = Caminaba Tiempo pasado indefinido (modo indicativo): I walked = Caminé The English language doesn't differentiate between these ...


2

Just to summarise the discussion in comments We agreed that the writer of the subtitles meant to write rayos. The remaining issue is the thorny question of how you translate obscenities from one language into another bearing in mind the context, the person who said it, the audience and so on. The exclamation 'shit!' is used for disappointment or surprise ...


0

Receso es la traduccion exacta de break en este contexto. Como estuvo tu receso de invierno.


11

As a former mathematician, yes. Something is diferenciable or derivable. In Spanish, there's a distinction between those, but not in English. diferenciable is used when talking about multivariable calculus; derivable is used when talking about single variable calculus. As for integrable, it stays the same, namely: Sea f una función integrable en un ...


1

Cuando te estresas te salen canas, es decir, cuando tienes muchos nervios o estrés se suele decir que te salen canas. Es una frase hecha.


5

From what I see (multiple links), the original quote by Francisco de Quevedo was: El mayor despeñadero, la confianza. You probably heard it in English, which probably lost part of its content by the translation, and then tried to translate it back to Spanish. It would be funny to do this over and over again and see what this sentence ends up being : ...


2

There are a few options here. You definitely can't just use decir in this situation, I don't think that would translate well. As a quite literal translation, you could try Puedo ver que estás triste. However a more "spanish" approach would probably be: Se nota que estás triste. A different but potentially useful structure could be Es + ...


4

Una cana es un pelo de color cano, es decir, blanco: DRAE (23.a ed.) cano, na Del lat. canus. 4. f. Cabello que se ha vuelto blanco. U. m. en pl. El estereotipo es que alguien con mucho estrés empieza a desarrollar pelo cano mientras todavía es de una edad más o menos joven.


1

For Castillian Spanish, the correct translation would be: Soy un reponedor. Cada noche repongo las estanterías en el supermercado. O sea, coloco en los estantes, con mucho cuidado, los productos que vienen en el camión. NOTE: we don't use "abarrotes" nor "gondolas" to refer to shelves (estantes, estanterías)


1

Stockeo, stockear o stockeador, is a "spanglish" word and therefore, incorrect. The correct translation would be "abastecer". To stock shelves = "abastecer los anaqueles". I stock shelves = "yo abastezco los anaqueles".


0

"Juega" is the imperative form of the verb: "Juega tú". "Juegue" is also the imperative form of the verb: "Juegue usted". It is easily seen that both forms are the second person of the singular on imperative tense, with "juega" associated with the informal "tú" and "juegue", coincident in form with the third person, associated with the more formal "usted". ...


5

In Argentina. "Repositor": Yo soy un repositor de góndola. Cada noche yo repongo las góndolas en el supermercado. O sea, coloco en los estantes, con mucho cuidado, los productos que vienen en el camión. "Repositor": stocker. "Góndola": estante. We call "depósito" the stocking place where products are stocked in boxes not to be seen by clients. And ...


6

From a mexican perspective, I'd think of the word surtir, followed by abastecer are the ones that sound more natural to me: Yo soy un surtidor de abarrotes. Cada noche yo surto los abarrotes en el supermercado. O sea, coloco en los estantes, con mucho cuidado, los productos que vienen en el camión. Yo soy un abastecedor de abarrotes. Cada noche yo ...


10

The word you're looking for is reponedor. Hence, your sentence becomes: Yo soy un reponedor de abarrotes. Cada noche yo repongo los abarrotes en el supermercado. O sea, coloco en los estantes, con mucho cuidado, los productos que vienen en el camión. I just realised you wanted an expression suitable for Mexico. If my answer doesn't fulfil what's ...


2

I'm sorry to disagree with @rsanchez but both translations are correct. "Difícil" also translates to "difficult" or "hard" see here Difficult is (see Merriam-Webster) not easy : requiring much work or skill to do or make not easy to deal with or manage not willing to help others by changing your behavior Let's say she had an accident and injured her ...


3

I would also find understandable something like ¡Empezar! or ¡Empieza! To mean "start new game".


4

Neither of your options is correct. The construction es difícil que is used to say that something is unlikely to happen, so your original sentence means: It is unlikely that she will talk. You can find more information in this article. EDIT: As there is an alternative answer, I'll expand here why I think mine is correct instead of in comments. These ...


2

For sure it would be "jugar". That is what most, if not all, spanish games use, as meaning "to play", what does the user want? he wants to play, he wants..."jugar". Don't think any conjugations of the verb work better than the infinitive


3

I feel that "jugar" or "juega" could also work for the game. To send a text on an iPhone you press the "ir" button to "go" or send. Like Ustanak said it would sound a little off to say "jugue" as the tú informal command. ¡jugar!


7

Interesting, both could work but, as a gamer, I've often seen ¡juega! instead of using the subjunctive. But I wouldn't be surprised if I saw the instruction given as ¡juegue!, it sounds a little weird to my ears though. However, base forms in English are often translated with the infinitive in Spanish, namely play! = ¡jugar!


1

For a beginner está preparada is easy to be confused with está preparando or ha preparado. La cena está preparada. The dinner is prepared. In the above sentence preparada is an adjective, related to la cena and not connected with está, and as such it has to match the noun (la cena) in the gender (feminine) and grammatical number (singular), so must ...


7

There is no such circumflex accent in Spanish. The only diacritics available are: acute accent sección código dieresis ungüento pingüino There is the letter ñ (with some sort of a diacritic), but we could say that is just a different letter than n.


0

Ok is not a word in Spanish. However, there are many different ways to substitute ok, but here are the most simple ways to say ok. Esta bien [it's okay] Estas/ esta bien? [are you okay] Si [yes] Use si when you are answering a question. For example ,"Quieres ir al parque?" You would answer [normally] with," Si. Quiero ir al parque." Not with ok like in ...


1

Gramaticalmente son todas las respuestas validas pero te recomendaría que te quedes con: (suenan mejor para alguien de habla hispana) No, la Plaza San Martín tiene tantas estatuas como la Plaza San Bolívar. y No, en la calle Luna hay tantas tiendas como en la calle Londres.


3

En México se utiliza el término juicio político de manera oficial, definido como tal en la constitución política del país. La cámara de diputados del gobierno mexicano emite información acerca de las asambleas celebradas con regularidad en el congreso, así como información relevante referente a las leyes estipuladas en la constitución política; La ...


8

SPANISH No. Una está bien. Se refiere al verbo "unir" y quiere decir que "No junte las palabras de modo que se oscurezca su significado." aunque esa frase necesita algo más de contexto para entenderse bien. Si fuera el verbo "usar" la frase debería ser "No uses (tu) las palabras de modo que se oscurezca su significado." o "No use (usted) las ...


6

In general, in Spanish we say "ganar dinero" as to earn money. That is, in a context when you explain someone's profession or activity: She earns a lot of money as a nurse Ella gana mucho dinero como enfermera If we want to express that someone made some money by doing something punctual, we use verbs like "sacar" in an informal context: She ...


-1

You should try: Bien por usted (ustedes for plural), if its formal Bien por ti informally


4

es bien doesn't actually replace OK, the one which does this is está bien. OK could be translated in many ways, these are perfectly idiomatic for any circumstance: De acuerdo. Está bien. Bien. Ningún problema. Me parece. Ya. OK (worldwide used)


1

Tienes dos opciones. La tradicional, pero hoy rara con algunos verbos, es usar el antiguo participio activo, formado con el sufijo -ante o -(i)ente (sobre la misma raíz que tiene el participio presente). No es siempre predecible si lleva -i- o no. En tus ejemplos, esta forma suena más natural: una vaca sonriente la población hispanohablante La ...


1

capable es un adjetivo. Comparar: No eres capaz. (Nos dirigimos a la persona mostrando que su cualidad para ejecutar una acción, no es posible.) No puedes hacerlo. (Mostramos que la persona no posee la habilidad de ejecutar una acción.) Todo depende en un tema de contexto, pues decir no puedes o no eres capaz, no son iguales pero la segunda ...


1

Para mí la relación sería: ser capaz - to be able / to not be able to poder - can / cannot (tanto con el sentido de "permiso" como con el sentido de "tener capacidad / habilidad para".


5

Workaround indica una solución temporal que se adopta ante la imposibilidad de aplicar la solución estándar u obvia. Se trata de "salir del paso" hasta que llegue el momento de la solución definitiva. (Al menos esa es la acepción en el sector de la informática) Apaño, parche, remiendo o chapuza mantienen el sentido original. Sin embargo, en mi opinión las ...


4

Creo que vas en la dirección adecuada. Añadiría apaño a tu lista. La respuesta de Rodrigo en los comentarios a tu pregunta, paliativo, es problemática por sus connotaciones médicas. Ahora bien, la definición de paliativo de la RAE nos acaba remitiendo a remedio, que, al contrario de lo que comentan otras respuestas, podríamos considerar otra buena ...


1

A usual way to write this in newspapers is: la Reforma de la Educación de Adultos (por sus siglas en [el idioma que sea], EDA) Fundéu has a recommendation that can be applied here.


1

"Good for you" can also be said in the sense that something is good for your(self): Comer fruta es bueno para ti This is very usually said in Spain omitting para ti itself and leaving it to the context: Comer fruta es bueno (para ti / para mí / para vosotros / para todos ... ) Tomar drogas es malo (para ti / ...)


1

From what I can see you are trying to translate "Good for you" from a non sarcastic perspective. Literal translation will be: "Bien por ti" but you will hardly hear someone say something like that. Even "Me alegro por ti" does not apply to the common language. You will probably hear something like: "¡Qué bueno!" or "¡Qué bien!" In both cases "you" is ...


6

La diferencia consiste en que un balón es aquel que se puede inflar, es decir, que tiene una válvula a través de la cual es posible inflarlo, por ejemplo, el balón utilizado en fútbol, basketball, volleyball, futbol americano, etc. Por otro lado, una pelota no se puede inflar, ya tiene un tamaño y forma predefinidas, tal es el caso de las pelotas de golf, ...


5

Las fracciones se traducen de acuerdo al uso de los números ordinales. Para 1/2 decimos un medio, 1/3 = un tercio. Usamos el entero (excepto con el número 1, que se dice un y no uno) en el numerador y medio o tercio en el denominador. Si deseamos avanzar desde el 4 en adelante, como 3/4, usamos el número ordinal en el denominador, esto es 1/4 = un cuarto. ...


8

I would say: Bien por ti. "Bien por ti" is almost always used sarcastically. How sarcastic it sounds depends mostly on your tone. For example, I would use "Bien por ti" to congratulate someone if I'm talking to them but I would never write it because it would most likely be misunderstood. If you don't want to sound sarcastic, a safer option would be: ...


3

No es algo exacto, pero es más bien por el tamaño (al menos en España). Se dice pelota de golf, pelota de tenis, pelota de ping pong, pero sin embargo es balón de fútbol, balón de baloncesto, etc.


2

You could keep que que to introduce a subordinate sentence, but you need a verb for that subordinate sentence. El Papa come papas. ¿Es que un caníbal? (wrong) El Papa come papas; ¿es que (él) es un caníbal? (pronoun could go before or after the second "es") This que could be switched for acaso or "por casualidad", and then you won't need the verb ...



Top 50 recent answers are included