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-1

🔥Dattes🔥 gshsbshdvsisba sus sus she shd is dhd dhd dhd dhd is dhd dhd she she dkd six Che six she do rid did de did s


2

Of course it could mean different things depending on the context. Maldito/a is one of those swearing words that could stress something as either positive or negative. The robots from Google (translator) are tranlating "ganas" as 2nd person present simple of "ganar" (to win): tú ganas. But that ganas actually means Deseo, apetito, voluntad de algo. ...


0

in ur column or row, u have the 5th position in the cue, yep?


0

Or maybe you were listening "El último de la fila". Such a good band! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkCCu9d-1PU


2

The expression tener ganas means "to be in the mood", so malditas ganas (ganas is always plural) in that song can mean something like "I hate that I'm in the mood".


3

I would say that de la fila means "of the list" (i.e. the top 10), although the normal thing would have been de la lista, at least in Spain.


3

It is worth mentioning that "Plebe" is an abbreviation of the word "Plebeyos" referring to a class of ancient Rome, which did not come from large families that founded Rome. It's like saying "the people" (La Plebe), sometimes used in a derogatory manner.


0

Como en México es menos común ir a la universidad, por lo general cuando se dice en español: Él no se graduó. se infiere que: no se graduó de la universidad / no terminó sus estudios / nunca empezó la universidad. o también "No terminó/acabó la universidad" puede acercarse mas a tu definición de "estudiante que abandona la universidad antes de ...


0

En Chile se utiliza el termino Egresado, para decir que terminó sus estudios universitarios pero que no se graduó.


1

For a short statement like this, I favor "Author's Note," i.e. a short piece of information which the author considers useful to readers before reading the book. It is a neutral term, whereas "Warning" or "Caveat" could be interpreted as negative, and I'm assuming no author wants to warn readers away. The Spanish "advertencia" is often used in the same way ...


3

I often use it this way when traveling or going out for quite a while. We'll need something to eat. No one lives from wind. Or Wind doesn't feed anybody. Maybe the guy on the social site doesn't have a job or something similar.


1

It is a colloquial way to say niños (i.e. "boys") in Mexico, Colombia, etc. Curious that the word is officially feminine in gender.


3

Cuentas would be any kind of bank account. Cuentas claras must be a specific product from a certain bank. "Cuentas claras" is nothing like a "Cuenta de ahorro (Savings account)" o "Cuenta corriente (Checking account)", which are the main kinds of accounts for any bank. For example, the bank ING Direct has a "Cuenta Naranja" which is nothing but the name ...


2

I would try Foreword. I would have favored "Note from the author", but as you say in the comments you want something less verbose. Actually, the only example I can think of it right now is Anathem, from Neal Stephenson, where he has a note for the reader and states that if the reader likes "hard" science fiction they can skip the note, and if not, there is ...


3

Como para casi todo, no creo que exista "la mejor" traducción para goddamn y que ésta sea invariable. Es cierto que en casi todos los ejemplos cabía la posibilidad de usar "maldito" o "condenado" pero, si he entendido bien, se encontraban todos en el mismo cómic por lo que el traductor puede haber optado por no repetirse (cosa a la que el castellano, no sé ...


7

En mi opinión, maldito es la mejor traducción. En los ejemplos que mencionas, se puede sustituir god damn por maldito y es entendible para todos los hispanohablantes. Por otro lado, términos como me cago en la leche y en general me cago en, son muy propios de España (según mi entender). Entonces, los ejemplos que mencionas podrían ser traducidos así: ...


5

ESPAÑOL (English follows) Es cierto que en muchas partes se les llama "perritos calientes". No sabía del origen del nombre, pero en wikipedia leo: El origen del término hot dog se debe, supuestamente, al humorista gráfico Tad Dorgan (1877-1929), que escribía y hacía tiras de dibujos en el New York Evening Journal. Dorgan asistía a un partido de ...


9

ESPAÑOL - English follows Puede ser una frase correcta. Persona 1 - ¿Qué tal me ha ido? Persona 2- ¿Que qué tal te ha ido? Te ha ido mal, porque no lo intentaste lo suficiente. Es una forma abreviada de preguntar: Persona 2 - ¿En serio? ¿Me estás preguntando que "qué tal te ha ido"? ENGLISH It may be a correct sentence. Person 1 - ¿Qué tal me ha ...


4

ESPAÑOL - English (follows) "Sugerir"/"proponer" y "sugerencia"/"propuesta", como en inglés "to suggest"/"to propose" y "suggestion"/"proposal", pueden emplearse del mismo modo en ciertos casos, aunque son sutilmente diferentes. Pueden equivaler a "recomendar" y "recomendación, como en inglés "to recommend" y "recommendation". En el caso de tu pregunta, ...


1

Se puede traducir esta frase: Dentro de un año, quizas te hubiera gustado comenzar hoy. a estas: Within a year, you might like to have started today. In a year, you may wish to have started today. A year from now you may wish you’d started today.


0

Although this word has translation in Spanish, I think this word: Irony can be used for what you are trying to express. For example: What is the irony of a boxer? I think "colmo" is one of the many word that does not have a direct translation in English, and this is why you need to find a word close to the meaning. EDIT: I looked the ...


-1

I saw a translation to "el colmo of..." long time ago. But you must have deep knowledge of the language. The "combler" is the closest you got and it is a good one. In fact, it is the one, but as the next entry says, "you cannot just borrow words and fit them into another language." The rest of the answers are not even close.


7

Indeed, dawn should be translated as "amanecer" or "alba" ... esperó al amanecer. ... esperó a las primeras luces del alba Seeing that you already found a really blatant example of bad translation in the version of that book you are working with, it should not be surprising this is another oner.


2

I guess it has to be a typo. The 22nd was Friday, both in English and Spanish; and that would not match well with feeling "a Sabbath lull in the air" that morning.


8

Not a literal translation but the closest attempt to put it into Spanish that I can think of would be: Tengo nostalgia del ayer. where el ayer refers to the past times in general as that is the purpose of the original English lyrics of the song you are trying to translate.


0

The Action of Giving explained. It's easy to say that to give something is "dative" when the definition of a dative case is when something is given, but looking at other dative verbs might help. Gustar / to please Regalar / to gift Decir / to say Apoyar / to aid Ayudar / to help Cuidar / to care Each of those verbs represents something that can be given ...


-1

We just learned this in class. Our teacher explained that for dative case--when someone is being given something--the someone must precede the something in the sentence. So your sentence works fine without the "le": Miguel dio a su novia un anillo. However, if you moved "un anillo" before "a su novia" in that sentence, "le" would be needed to keep the ...


3

While you are correct when you say voy means going to, it's odd to translate it like that when there is no actual going to in your original sentence. A better approach would be: En dos años creo que trabajaré en un laboratorio. Also remember that in English you use will to change a verb to its future tense, so in this case it should also change in ...


3

The correct construction would be "voy a trabajar" (tú vas a trabajar, ella va a trabajar, etc.) The periphrastic future is "Ir a" + infinitive. The only one you needed to conjugate was the "ir", the infinitive is left invariable for all persons. Also, "creer" needs a "que" when a clause follows. Thus, "creo que voy a trabajar en un laboratorio". Edit: ...


-3

"El Chico" That is the best translation


2

To convey the pejorative connotations of "young whippersnapper" to "the kid" as a moniker I would go with: Niñato: Dicho de un joven: Sin experiencia /Petulante y presuntuoso It addresses someone young (who is possibly rude or a spoiled brat) as unexperienced but yet overconfident and annoying. Other synonyms for "kid" (apart from the more mainstream ...


3

Whereas you want to translate a word with a marked connotative tone, do not use saying "El Niño" which is very neutral in the case. Instead you could use any of the following: El Chico El Nene El Chavo (México) El Chaval (España) El Pibe (Argentina) In Chile we prefer "El Cabro Chico", but is a local idiom.


1

Have in mind that they are not book translations, they are called adaptations so it happens with any book, written in any language. Things as simple as quarter, are adapted to "25 centavos" because we are not used to say "un cuarto" and in some regions we don't have cents any more, from long time ago.


1

Tutor(a) particular is an option but it is not the most used way, I'll prefer profesor (a) / maestro (maestra) particular but you need to check for a specific region/ country.


1

In Spain I would say "profesor particular"


4

The literal translation is "tutor privado", but you can use "tutor particular", "profesor particular", or "maestro particular", if you want to refer to a legal guardian most common use is "tutor legal".


6

In Chile we say profesor particular.


5

En mi caso, yo usualmente uso: Fuera de contexto Ejemplo: ¡Lo que tratas de decir está fuera de contexto!


6

Translating is an art, not a science. When encountering dialectal variations, a translator needs to make decisions based on many different factors: authorial intent, the author's perceived/intended audience, the purpose of the translation, the context in the original work, etc. Generally, it's easier to just translate to a standard version of the language ...


1

Lo mas cercano que conozco en mi idioma que signifique lo que en inglés significa off topic es la expresión: "hablando de todo como los locos". No es una traducción, no es un equivalente, solo contiene el espíritu de la idea. Off Topic: hablando de todo como los locos. Expresa la misma intención.


1

Instead of constructing it in a manner parallel to English, I'd probably express it using a different verb. Depending on the context, the verb chosen could vary. For example, "How big is..." could be "Cuánto mide...". In the context of a restaurant, and if you're talking about how big a portion of food is for a given plate, I might say "Es mucha comida para ...


4

Como @guifa ya mencionó, las opciones ya propuestas por tu amigo español son precisamente lo que yo sugeriría. Cuando tu amigo dijo que era algo "incorrecto" se refería seguramente a que no pertenece al registro formal del idioma en España. A veces las personas mezclan algo que en realidad no es permitido por la gramática del idioma, y algo que simplemente ...


3

Qué tan [adj] funciona para muchos adjetivos. Grande, pequeño, caliente, frío, cerca, lejos... Todo lo que se pueda cuantificar.


4

En Wikipedia en español, hay un artículo "trol" en lo que se refiere al internet. En ese artículo, se usa la frase "fuera de tema". Ver entrada Esa frase es un enlace a otro artículo, pero si se hace click, se llega a un artículo en español que sólo usa la palabra "off'topic". Interesante.


4

"Off topic" en español está relacionado con algo que, dentro de un tema determinado, la nueva idea presentada no tiene relación. Esto puede ser de forma permanente o temporal, pero es una idea aparte de lo que principalmente se habla. La expresión más certera puede escribirse o expresarse de manera oral como "punto aparte". Por ejemplo: Se habla de un tema ...


2

The most appropriate adjective is "estremecedora", because it meets all the characteristics of the adjective "haunting". Meaning of "estremecedora": to remove (something like a tremor) something inside someone deeply. In this context "melodía estremecedora" gives way to be something beautiful, something enthralling and somber / sad. To explain the ...


4

Yo propongo la expresión: Fuera de ámbito Funcionaría bien en un contexto como este foro, donde puedes cerrar una pregunta porque está fuera de(l) ámbito del sitio. Es una expresión un poco más corta ya sencilla que "No viene al caso" o "Sin relación con el tema" o incluso "está fuera de lugar" (una de las propuestas en el enlace a Wordreference que ...


4

Traditionally, adiós is used for someone leaving for an extended period of time or with no expectation of seeing them again. Chau is informal, and would virtually always imply you'd be expecting to see them again relatively soon. If you're leaving work and going to meet up with coworkers later for drinks, chau is better than adiós. If you're going abroad ...


1

They mean the same. Chao (or chau) is a bit more informal. It comes from the Italian ciao, which also means "goodbye" (in Italian).


-1

In Spain we say "Hola" or "Buenas" which means Hello here.



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