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10

English: Whose tea is it? Is it your tea, his tea, or her tea? Spanish (literal): ¿De quién es el té? ¿Es tu té, su té, o su té? Alternate (natural) to make it clear: ¿De quién es el té? ¿Es tuyo, de él, o de ella? All the posessive adjectives ("/" separates gender, "," separates number): my -> mi, mis your -> tu, tus his/her/its -> ...


7

I'm from Spain, so the language may differ a bit, but "te amo" is pretty much a superlative form itself. You can say "te quiero muchísimo", but I think "te amo" has the same meaning, "te amo mucho" doesn't make much sense to me. About the second phrase, omit the "tu". ¡Mi amor! Te amo. Eres el amor de mi vida or ¡Mi amor! Te quiero muchísimo. Eres ...


6

If you want to be really old fashioned, you can ask ¿Cúyo té es? Where cúyo/a/os/as is an interrogative that needs to agree with the possessed item and is directly equivalent to English whose?. But in modern day Spanish, that is not used (and so you shouldn't either, unless you're a native speaker, in which case you should to bring it back to life ...


5

La expresión correcta es "Tiempo de calidad". Cualidad define una propiedad Los metales tienen la cualidad de conducir la electricidad mientras que calidad se refiere a la excelencia de dichas propiedades Ese material es de buena calidad Dado que quality time expresa la excelencia del tiempo pasado junto a alguien o haciendo algo, el término ...


4

La expresión que más oigo para ese significado es "buenos momentos" (o "buenos ratos"). En bastante menor medida encuentro a veces la expresión "momentos de calidad". Muy rara vez escucho decir en español "tiempo de calidad", y la mayoría de las veces es un texto escrito que ha sido traducido del inglés, o en el contexto de una charla sobre el argumento de ...


4

"En un día típico, (yo) leo un rato, y después, me acuesto" is very accurate. In Spanish, "for a while" can be written as "durante un rato," or "por un rato," but normally, one would say "un rato." However, one may write the following sentence: "on a typical day, I read for two hours," as either of the following: "en un día típico, (yo) leo dos ...


4

Indeed, that's an error. It should be Este dinero se lo dio a Dill, ...


4

While using haber and estar together works perfectly well for translating English's progressive/continuous perfects, there's a more natural way to render them in Spanish using llevar: I have been waiting all my life. He estado esperando toda mi vida. (less natural). Llevo toda la vida esperando. (more natural)


4

Either "He estado esperándote" or "Te he estado esperando" and then something like "toda mi vida", "todo este tiempo", etc.


3

La traducción que se le ha dado en los distintos grupos de Desarrollo Web en Facebook, Google+, Twitter, etc, es la de Interfaz de Usuario Adaptable (aunque adaptivo no es correcto, el significado se entiende). Voto por "Adaptable".


3

Yes, there is a mistake with the second "la". There is another error. The last word is "senoras" in plural and without the "ñ". Should be "señora".


3

Using the link to wikipedia you provided and switching language to Spanish, it seems that Latent Variable is indeed translated as "Variable latente". "Coordenadas Discriminantes" seems to be a proper translation for Discriminate Coordinates. Maybe there is no term in Spanish to refer to the kind of plot you link on your question, but that translation will ...


3

About the second term, I'm sure it is Variable latente. You can check it in both english ans spanish versions on wikipedia: Latent variable Variable Latente About the first term, I guess it is Variables Discriminantes (if these are the same as "predictor variables" in english), based in Latent Variables (Variables Latentes) and Eigenvalues (Autovectores o ...


3

Yes, it is most definitely the correct translation. Ironically, peso is also used as a name for a currency, and it carries this same motif of weight that your question has. Libra is not only used to express British pounds, but rather, American pounds (lbs).. as weight. 1 libra = 16 onzas


3

It depends on a lot of factors, mainly dictated by history. Consider the name of states: Florida is still often translated as La Florida (from tierra florida, IIRC). But Montana, which comes from Spanish Montaña is both spelled and pronounced Montana in modern Spanish. Most cities that end in -b(o)urg(h) will be -burgo, and most cities with European ...


2

"To me, translating 'Monterey' as 'Monterrey' almost seems tantamount to a Dutchman translating 'New York' as 'New Amsterdam.'" But "New York" will be perfectly translated as "Nueva York" when translating the text to Spanish. "London" would have been translated as "Londres" and the list goes on. Thus, the Spanish version of the novel will use the ...


2

Tanto En un día típico, yo leo un rato y después me acuesto como En un día típico, yo leo por un rato y después me acuesto Son válidas, aunque ciertamente algunos hablantes favorecerán una sobre la otra. Tanto por como durante sirven para expresar la duración cuando una acción se prolonga en el tiempo, así que incluso podrías decir En un ...


2

"As of today" could be sometimes translated as "desde hoy", but most times it should be "hasta hoy" or better "hasta ahora" or "hasta el momento", meaning from last times until today or until the present moment. "Heard from him" literally is "oído desde él", but it should be translated as "sabido de él", meaning "recibido noticias sobre él" (get news about ...


2

Cualidad in Spanish means an attribute. Calidad means quality. Since in English the word quality has both meanings, you have to put in in context. When you use the word quality to mean attribute, use "cualidad." Otherwise, use "calidad."


2

There are, of course, many ways to ask for a drink, and most of them will have the same basic result: You receiving a drink. As you imply, some are more polite than others. If the bartender has already asked you "¿Qué te gustaría tomar?" (or similar), you can politely respond pretty much as you suggested: Quiero un vino, por favor. If you have to ...


2

In Chile we always reply En su nombre... (formal) or En tu nombre... (informal) which roughly means "I will greet all in your name".


1

That makes sense. In spanish, "muchísimo" and "mucho" depends on how excited you are, being the first one the most excited expression.} I would have texted something like... but anyways you're right. Mi amor, ¡Te amo muchísimo! ¡Eres el amor de mi vida!


1

In this case, you will use the verb "haber" to mean "to have", combined the the past participle of a verb. To say "To be waiting", we can say "Estar esperando." So, "I have been waiting" is "He estado esperando."


1

Similar to another post but... If we bring Portuguese into the mix it might shed some light into this whole question. "Thank you!" = "Obrigado(a)!" > which literally means I am obliged or I now am obligated to repay your favor. "You are welcome!" = "De nada" > I'm basically saying to that person who thanked me that it didn't cost me anything (effort or ...


1

You can reply with the usual forms hola buenos días, etc... Even if the speaker seems to be trying to reach a broad audience, you don't need to go with anything special, like "saludos a ti también" or another "saludos a todos". Imagine yourself in a room with other people, when some else joins the group and says saludos a todos (like a teacher who enters ...


1

La traducción correcta es "Tiempo de Calidad". La expresión "tiempo de cualidad" no existe en español. Tampoco existe una expresión concreta, pero se podría traducir como "Un rato agradable". Espero que te sea de ayuda.


1

In Spain I heard both /brái.le/ and /brái.lle/, with a majority of /brái.lle/ . Everybody will understand both of them.


1

In Latin America it is more common to pronounce it like brɑile (bat-rat-Arm-see-leg-bed) [Put the stress intonation on the A of arm] You can write the word brɑile in Google Translator from Spanish to English and click on the speaker button from Spanish side to hear the sound.


1

The polite (and I think most common) way is "¿Me pone X, por favor?" being X "un vino", "una coca-cola", "una tapa de jamón". As Flimzy said, if you have to approach the bartender, add "Perdone" before



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