Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

The word "see" here is used to emphasize that the speaker wants to ensure that the message was understood by his audience. In english, it really should be written as a question "..., you see?" Understanding it from this perspective, you can translate in a variety of ways. I would recommend "..., me entiendes?"


4

You can either say: El cinco de diciembre. or: El día cinco de diciembre. emphasizing the day. When it's the first day you can say: El primero de diciembre or: El día primero del mes.


4

I think the best way of conveying that someone "is in the way" and is preventing you to access something or go somewhere is Estás en medio Other way could be Me cierras el paso (o me estás cerrando el paso)


4

You could use: Me sigues? Me entiendes / entiendes? Comprendes? Vale? ¿Ves?


3

In Spanish we have Fuego, Lumbre, Fogata y Hoguera, among others. Fogata is something that you can start in the forest, like a camp fire to roast marshmallows or burn weeds. Is not big. Hoguera is a big fire. Think of the bonfires of Saint John or burning a witch in a stake. A fire of that size is called Hoguera. Fuego is the most common and generic word ...


3

Here you have some examples, but there are hundreds like this. Ya tuve suficiente. Paso de todo/esto/de ti. No (lo) aguanto más. Me rindo. No lo tolero más. Estoy harto de todo esto. Estoy hasta el moño. Estoy hasta la coronilla. Estoy hasta las narices. Estoy hasta el cogote. Estoy hasta la madre ...


3

Esto is the neuter form of este, which is masculine. In Spanish, neuter pronouns are used to refer to something that has just been mentioned or that is about to be said, and also to ask or talk about statements, ideas, and vague or unnamed things. Decir eso es tanto como no decir nada. Nunca olvides esto: tu familia siempre te apoyará. ¿Qué es aquello ...


2

The translation should be: El cinco de diciembre. Where in this case, you should ommit the word "the" in the translation: So, the result will be: The 5th of December. And there, you'll get an adequate translation.


2

Incendio forestal, o incendio en general es un fuego sin control. Chimenea u hogar, el lugar donde se hace fuego para calentarse en la casa. Fogón para cocinar. Fogata en el campamento. Hoguera para quemar o incinerar cosas o personas. En hogueras quemaban a las brujas y a los herejes en la Edad Media. Fuego, fósforos o encendedor para los cigarrillos. ...


2

Sí, es: Estás en medio. O: Estás en el medio. Estás en el camino es incorrecto para este uso. Ya que esto es algo muy idiomático, añado también posibles formas de pedir a alguien que deje de estar en medio. El verbo apartar(se): ¿Puedes apartarte? / Aparta, por favor. / Aparta de ahí. / ... La expresión hacerse a un lado: Hazte a un lado, por ...


2

Most of the examples said here express how tired or fed up you are with something/someone, but aren't saying you are definitely going to stop doing something. If you explicitly want to say you're going to stop doing 'something', I would use any of this: ¡Se acabó! ¡Hasta aquí he llegado! ¡Hasta aquí! "Se acabó" has almost the same meanings ...


2

I would say Simplemente hazlo, although depending on the context it would be better to say hazlo de una vez (similar to do it already).


1

Your observation is very clever, because it corresponds to what it should be if we applied the grammatical logic. However, no native speaker sane even imagine "la que que amaba". Sounds strange and absurd. Remember that the existence of pronouns is due to the linguistic economy. Prevents redundancy maintaining the topic in visible scope. But in that sense ...


1

The meaning of "es por ti" is "you are the cause of this" Es por ti que late mi corazón but "Es por ti" could also convey "es para ti" Es por ti que tenemos estos asientos tan cómodo, porque nos importas, porque lo mereces. In this case it can also mean that you are cause and recipient (for being such a wonderful customer we are going to give you ...


1

Avianca, the airline, is giving the reason for all their efforts: It is because of you I just remembered a song by Juanes: [http://youtu.be/-9l5t3MWss8] Es por tí... all a lover does because of the loved one.


1

Both are acceptable, but have slightly different meanings (as in English). Some alternatives: Quiero volver a donde estábamos antes (slightly weird construction, but natural) Quiero volver a donde estábamos entonces. Quiero continuar/retomar/recomenzar nuestra relación tal como era entonces. In all cases, "quiero" (I want) would probably ...


1

I have just started learning Spanish, see. See means "ves", and u can use it this way: Recién empecé a aprender español, ¿ves? I wouldn"t suggest using "¿vale?", "¿captas?", "¿me sigues?" because thats informal and its used only by spanish people, so if you want to use spanish in south america u shouldnt use them. More formal is "¿entiende usted?", you can ...


1

Fíjate que acabo de comenzar a aprender español. Sabes qué? Acabo de ... Sabes que acabo de ... Adivina qué? Acabo de ... Te voy a contar, acabo de ... I don't like the use of me entiendes or similar ones. Sounds like the English you know what I mean. It is a very common "crutch" but I find it kind of rude, like you are speaking ...


1

I'm from Mexico, I know clay can mean 'arcilla' so I guess it's because people speak different in different parts of the country, that might explain why they don't know (or don't find it common) the word 'arcilla'.


1

A very (and I mean very) colloquial way would be "Me tiene podrido/a", which is argentinian/uruguayan slang. It literally means that you're rotten but it refers to being incredibly fed up/done with someone/something. You can say it to people too ("¡Me tenés podrido!") and it can also mean you're bored/tired of something ("Me pudrí de estudiar, así que me voy ...


1

These are some examples that I mostly hear and use: Ya he tenido suficiente de... Ya es suficiente... ¡Basta ya! (or simply) ¡Basta! Me rindo. Ya no puedo mas con (whatever you're doing), me rindo. The first one examples and adjetives provided by @AlexBcn in his answer are also valid (except the very rude section).


1

Estoy hasta el perno. This is probably local to Peru. I've never heard it elsewhere. Estoy harto de esto. I'm fed up with this.


1

Parece ser que en español se usa el término triaje, aunque no está recogido en el diccionario de la RAE (Aunque Triar sí, con el significado de "Escoger, separar, entresacar"). Parece ser que el término se ha incorporado al vocabulario técnico del francés con el significado de Clasificación de pacientes que establece el orden de atención. Al ser un ...


1

You are referring to a very colloquial, regional, and sometimes vulgar expression. A huevos! (Sí) A puro huevo! (A la fuerza u obligado) Huevos! (Mejor no!) Estar de a huevos! (Estar alguien bien en Guatemala, o mal en Cuba) Hacer algo a huevo (obligado o a la fuerza) Ser alguien de a huevo (ser valiente) Ahuevado (avergonzado, indolente, aburrido, depende ...


1

According to some references, it does indeed has to do with testicles. It seems that the meaning of this expression in Mexico is "por la fuerza". In Spanish, saying that someone has "balls" means that is brave, bold, or has courage (in English too, right?). According to this reference, En México poner a huevo significa hacerlo a fuerzas (p. ej. "No ...


1

in Argentina we would say: Que boludo! It is a very common argentinian expression.


1

There are: este (m.), esta (f.), they play as adjectives. éste (m.), ésta (f.), esto (n.), they play as sustantives. Examples (well formed): —Yo como esta fruta. —¿Cuál fruta? —Ésta. —Yo bebo este licor. —¿Cuál licor? —Éste. —Me golpearon con una cosa. —¿Con qué? —Con esto. If you say "Yo tiro esta", the phrase is incomplete, if you say "Yo tiro ...


1

Yes, but not usually when we want to refer to electic power. When I think of "luces" I think of the lights they put on stages at concerts or venues. "Se fueron las luces" gives me the feeling that the lights moved out of sight, while "se apagaron las luces" means they were turned off. Note that we also say "se fue la luz" when we want to say that there's a ...


1

As a native Spanish speaker, I can say we use esto and este interchangeably sometimes, however, if I were to translate "I throw this" I would say "Tiro esto", and instead I would say "Tiro este" if the original sentence was "I throw this one". As you can see, the main difference is how specific is the subject you're talking about, and that, depends on ...


1

In my honest opinion, it's better to attribute the idea of a "badass" as a quality that a person possesses (i.e. adjective) rather than a kind of person (noun). In this light, the most appropriate word would be machin (accent on the i). It's like "macho", but to the extreme! Also, since it happens to contain "chin" in it, it has almost the feel of the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible