Hot answers tagged

15

In these types of cases you could also just use "que es": Me gusta el azul, que también es el color del cielo. Using "el cual es" sounds a little outdated, formal or regional to me. It reads a little like something written by someone from Spain. But again, this might just be because in certain places it is more common to use "que" than "el cual" for ...


10

Another option apart from 野原無's answer is very similar to your original choice, and it would be el cual es, so you would have the following options: Me gusta el azul, el cual es también el color del cielo. Me gusta el azul, el cual también es el color del cielo. Edit: of course you would have to coordinate gender/number depending on the sentence: ...


9

Firstly, "cuánto/cuánta/cuántos/cuántas" is an adjetivo interrogativo which, as all adjectives, must agree with the noun it qualifies — "manzanas", in this case. Secondly, the adverb "más", if paired with some kind of quantifier, is generally placed after the noun: ¿Cuántas manzanas más necesitas? Necesito tres manzanas más. Then I wouldn't separate ...


7

Algunas alternativas: Él es un buen esquiador, pero no tan bueno. Él es buen esquiador, pero no tanto. Es buen esquiador, pero le falta. Si quieres incluir en la misma frase la parte referente a la gran montaña puedes usar: Él es buen esquiador pero no tan bueno como para esquiar en una gran montaña. Es buen esquiador pero no tanto ...


7

You can say tomárselo con calma/ tranquilidad, although it generally refers to how you embark on a new project or face a task: I have to write a paper, but since the deadline is in two weeks I'm taking it easy = Tengo que redactar un trabajo, pero como la fecha de entrega es en dos semanas me lo voy a tomar con tranquilidad. [More examples here] ...


6

In English, this is a non-defining relative clause. Keep it simple, you can just replace which by que: Me gusta el azul, que también es el color del cielo. The relative pronouns which, who & that can all be replaced by que to form subordinated sentences in Spanish.


6

Rude words and expressions have little to do with their literal meanings. For example a literal translation of "God damn it!" would be something like "¡Que Dios lo condene!" which doesn't sound rude at all in Spanish. In fact it sounds kind of refined, like you personally think something is bad but are humbly deferring the judgment to God. It is inevitable ...


5

The most common ways are to just answer affirmative (sí) and either parroting back the same verb (in your case, sí, podré/puedo) or sometimes using a generic verb like hacer (e.g., sí, lo haré). The trick is that English allows answering questions with just an auxiliary verb, but Spanish doesn't, and in case, as you've seen, what's done with an auxiliary ...


5

Greek k and ch [x] passed early into Latin as c with the sound [k]. Then a sound change -still in Latin- made c- different before -e and -i, which Spanish inherited (after another sound change). K works mostly for new or specialized scientific terms. Some of them may become written with q with time, as they are adopted into mainstream language (k tends to ...


5

how fast has two ways: Depende de qué tan rápido eres capaz de aprender. Depende de cuán rápido eres capaz de aprender. Often, qué tan and cuán are interchangeable.


5

In general, to translate how fast, lo rápido is a good construction. So I would say: Depende de lo rápido que puedas aprender Or, something that sounds a bit better but is not that much a direct translation of the full sentence: Depende de lo rápido que aprendas Here, lo works as a neutral defined article, as DRAE says: art. deter. n. ...


5

I suppose that this refers to something that has been already introduced in the conversation, and is something known by the people speaking. So I would translate to something like this: Me extraña, porque ahora algunos lo están negando. Note that weird is a personal opinion, so I tried to emphasise that in the translation. Other possible not-so-literal ...


5

As stated on wikipedia Formal salutations. Only written. "Estimado" (+ name or title "Señor". "Sr." is the abbreviation). For male. Example for a man called Juan García: "Estimado Juan" or "Estimado Sr. García". The last is more formal. "Estimada" (+ name or title "Señora". "Sra." is the abbreviation). For female. Example for a woman ...


4

Your sentence sounds okay and is perfectly understandable, but I'd prefer: No es una rueda de prensa de la que estar orgulloso. Other options are: No es una rueda de prensa de la que sentirse orgulloso. No es una rueda de prensa de la que enorgullecerse. Both are fine and mean the same thing as the first one. Now, the Spanish sentence ...


4

Your attempt is correct. You just missed the fact that "manzanas" is feminine, so "cuántos" has to match the gender and be "cuántas": ¿Cuántas más manzanas tiene Ali que Phil? However, to me it sounds a bit better to swap both terms and say: ¿Cuántas manzanas más tiene Ali que Phil?


4

El DRAE dice que sí, que deben acentuarse: 6. Acentuación de palabras extranjeras 6.2. Palabras extranjeras adaptadas. Las palabras de origen extranjero ya incorporadas al español o adaptadas completamente a su pronunciación y escritura, incluidos los nombres propios, deben someterse a las reglas de acentuación de nuestro idioma: béisbol, del ...


3

I like blue, which is also the color of the sky Translates to any of these: Me gusta el azul, que también es el color del cielo. Me gusta el azul, que es también el color del cielo. Me gusta el azul, el cual es también el color del cielo. Me gusta el azul, el cual es, además, el color del cielo. Me gusta el azul, que además, es el color ...


3

In Spanish the proper way is Dr. (male) or Dra. (female). Both are abbreviations of doctor and doctora, respectively. If you use the whole word, it can be used in lower case, but if you use the abbreviation, it is used in upper case, even in the middle of a sentence. In all cases, the title is followed by the person's surname. Examples: - Tengo que ...


3

"Which" has several translations besides "cual" - see, for instance here In the sentence you are asking about I think "que" would be best, thus your "...which is also..." would be rendered "...que también es..."


3

In Colombia "taking it easy" and "just chilling", both expressions mean the same: Aquí, pasándola Nada, fresco, ... Todo bien... Nada hermano, pasándola... Gozándola Examples: A - ¿Qué haces? B - Aquí pasándola... A - ¿Cómo estás? B - Bien, fresco, todo bien. A - ¿Cómo estás? B - Bien, aquí gozándola... There are a lot of ...


3

As 野原無 says, raisins (pasas) are well known in Spain. But thinking a bit about the context, chapter XII of that book happens while travelling aboard the ship, just before landing. I don't think it possible to have grapes aboard for a long time, as grapes get rotten easily due to its water content. Raisins are just dried grapes and last for a very long time. ...


3

Tubería Pero si hay varios comandos juntos usaría encadenar (o cadena de comandos), como la traducción portuguesa de Pipeline > Encadeamento.


3

Estas formas son equivalentes: ¿A cuántos estudiantes más les gusta más el ciclismo que nadar? ¿A cuántos estudiantes más les gusta el ciclismo más que nadar? y ¿A cuántos estudiantes más les gustan más las manzanas que las naranjas? ¿A cuántos estudiantes más les gustan las manzanas más que las naranjas? The second form sounds ...


3

Besides the arguments given by @SantagoTórtora, you have to considerer that usually it takes more time to read than to listen. In a movie that is fast paced, they may need to cut the subtitles short, and that may be another reason for their not translating faithfully the audio - they sometimes omit words (or even full sentences), make substitutions , etc. A ...


3

Una traducción (casi palabra a palabra), pero que evita la palabra apertura, y sigue siendo lo suficientemente neutral y fluida podría ser: Falló el intento de abrir del archivo[fichero] con código de error 500 Otra posibilidad, un poco más libre, y un poco más natural para mi gusto (pero en esto los regionalismos a veces influyen más de lo que uno se ...


2

Caminaré = I will walk (at some unspecified time in the future, a prediction) Camino mañana = I will walk tomorrow (the present tense is used when the time is made explicit: Te llamo esta noche = I will call you tonight.) N.B. The future in Spanish, unlike English, is often used to express conjecture or probablity: ¿Dónde estará mi hermano? = I ...


2

This is a question primarily about verb tenses, so let's see what we have, only in those cases where there have been any trouble (with the tense by its Spanish name): Tiempo pasado imperfecto (modo indicativo): I walked = Caminaba Tiempo pasado indefinido (modo indicativo): I walked = Caminé The English language doesn't differentiate between these ...


2

Just to summarise the discussion in comments We agreed that the writer of the subtitles meant to write rayos. The remaining issue is the thorny question of how you translate obscenities from one language into another bearing in mind the context, the person who said it, the audience and so on. The exclamation 'shit!' is used for disappointment or surprise ...


2

There are a lot of ways to express that, but there's no way to directly translate "I will". Since the son is being asked whether he can finish his homework by 6, he could respond: "Sí, puedo" or "Sí, señor", or simply "Sí". I am always telling my wife: get away from the idea that you have to translate phrases word for word. It's the thought that counts!


2

"Cambio de tema" es un término muy común que puede intercambiarse perfectamente. Por ejemplo: Si me permites el cambio de tema, Bla bla bla, bla bla bla.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible