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11

En español se usan las las abreviaturas a.m. (del latín ante merídiem "antes del mediodía") y p.m. (del latín post merídiem "después del mediodía"). Estas abreviaturas deben escribirse en minúsculas y con la puntuación indicada. Para las doce de la mañana (o del mediodía) se utiliza m. (del latín meridies "mediodía"). Así, por ejemplo: La entrada es a ...


11

I don't know if there's any official standard about this, but: The single-letter abbreviations are: L, M, X, J, V, S, D Note that miércoles is usually written as X, so as not to confuse it with martes. Regarding múltiple letter abbreviations, the usual way is two-letter abbreviations: Lu, Ma, Mi, Ju, Vi, Sa, Do UPDATE: A reference


8

Yeah it's the same in Spanish. You have to use "Buenos días" if you're in the morning,"Buenas Tardes" for the afternoon/evening and "Buenas noches" at night. It's difficult to say when you have to stop saying "Buenos días" and start saying "Buenas Tardes". Literally, the point would be at noon, but at least in Spain people say "Buenos días" before having ...


6

In this sense, faltar means "to be left." So "me falta esperar 10 minutos" would be translated "I have 10 minutes left to wait." If you were talking about losing time you'd use perder.


6

¿Cuánto tiempo toma llegar a "lugar" desde "lugar" en "medio de transporte"? ¿Cuánto tiempo toma llegar a los Angeles en carro? ¿Cuánto tiempo toma llegar a Nueva York en avión desde aquí? ¿Está a 50 millas de aquí? ¿Cuánto tiempo toma? You can use: ¿Cuánto tiempo toma llegar a Los Ángeles en carro.? ¿Cuánto toma llegar a Los Ángeles en carro.? ...


6

I would say something like this (I'm using third person singular because I suppose it is in a very formal environment so I would use "Usted" as subject): If you want to detail it from the past to the present: ¿Desde cuándo quiere que detalle mi actividad laboral? If you want to detail it from the present to the past: ¿Hasta cuándo quiere que ...


6

Se podría decir: La página ya estaba caída el lunes. La página ya estaba caída por lo menos desde el lunes.


5

I just want to add a standard Spanish example, as I see the previous answer is more Mexican-oriented (with all due respect). Cuánto se tarda en llegar a Los Ángeles en coche? Está a 50 millas? Cuánto se tarda en llegar? Also, for differentiation, in Spain we would not replace "cuánto" with "qué tanto" and we would not use "tomar", although we would ...


5

Matutino and vespertino are adjectives. Nocturno belongs in the same set, madrugada does not. They are sometimes used alone, but that's because the noun is being left out. In the case of the church, they may be referring to "servicio matutino"; in the school it may be "turno matutino". Another common usage in that regard is to refer to daily newspapers.


4

Although there may be several options, you can just make the person and tense concordant with those of the previous verb, thus: Los domingos por la mañana vemos televisión. This is indicative present, first person plural. So we use indicative present, first person plural for levantarse: en cuanto nos levantamos... Another: yo siempre sigo ...


4

You refer to a specific decade in Spanish like this: The nineteen-sixties (written 1960's): Los sesenta La década de los sesenta Los años sesenta Granted, referring to the first decade of a century is sometimes difficult this way. The nineteen-hundreds (1900's) is usually taken to mean 1900-1999 and not 1900-1909, but that's a separate question. ...


4

These seem to be the Spanish equivalent of the "Canonical hours", specifically Matins and Vespers. I had to look it up on Wikipedia to find the name after a hunch that it sounded like the divisions of the day of the monks in Umberto Eco's novel The Name of the Rose. So yes there is at least one more word like them, Lauds. Well that's the English versions, ...


4

I would go with ser: El jueves era el día que cenábamos pizza cuando yo era pequeño. Los jueves eran los días que cenábamos pizza. We use ser to refer when a event takes place. El domingo es el día de ir a misa.


3

Se podría decir: La página web estaba caída a día de ayer La página web no estaba disponible a día de ayer


3

In Spain, the most usual translation is hasta cuándo quieres que llegue; for example: How far back do you want me to go filling out the form? ¿Hasta cuándo quieres que llegue rellenando el formulario?


3

This happens because the structures of a Latin language can not be immediately translated to a Germanic language. It does not make sense to say "why this is not in Spanish like it is in English?". To the point of 'ya', you are correct, it can mean all three 'yet', 'already' and 'anymore' depending on if it goes together with positive, negative or ...


3

First of all it's spelled "Cuándo" and in reference to your question at least here, in Spain, both sentences mean exactly the same, we use both indifferently.


3

In speech in Mexico I only ever noticed de la mañana for AM de la tarde for PM In English pronouncing the abbreviations is just as common in speech as in writing but I'm sure I never heard anyone pronounce them in spoken Spanish though it's clear from the other answers here that they are normal in written Spanish.


2

Tan pronto como nos levantamos, prendemos el televisor It's present tense, actually. And it's the same as in English ("as soon as we get up, we turn on..."), I think Algunos me dicen terco, pero yo siempre sigo luchando hasta que logro mis metas It's, again, present, your are not referring to an uncertain future event, but to a "present" certain ...


2

Buenos días -> until 12:00pm Buenas tardes -> from 12:01pm to last sun light Buenas noches -> after sunlight is gone Buen día differ if used like -> Que tenga un buen día = Have a nice day || Otherwise it can be interpreted as Good morning Variables such as Buenas are used in some countries | Buenas = Howdy (no time frame). For those getting doubts or ...


1

Events took place on a determinate moment, but as far as you know that this is inmutable, you should use "Ser". You only can use "Estar" in certain cases when you know that the event is susceptible to change it's schedule. La reunión está programada para el viernes. La reunión es el viernes. Both phrases are equally valid, however, the first one ...


1

Your original sentence in English is both ambiguous and unusual. The ambiguity lies in the word 'that'. Do you mean "That (event) is...", or are you talking about an event "... that is..."? Instead of your construction, I would rather say the event "is ... in the future" or at least "... from today". Having said this, it is difficult to find a correct ...


1

The expression me falta esperar 10 minutos is not customary from any particular country, it is standard spanish. You could also say Me faltan 10 minutos de espera or Me quedan 10 minutos de espera. Its literal meaning is I have 10 minutes of waiting left, which would be said more commonly by an english speaker as I still have to wait 10 more minutes. ...


1

You use AM / PM in Spanish the same way you use AM / PM in English. In fact they mean the same in both languages: AM = Ante Meridiem = Before noon = Antes del mediodía PM = Post Meridiem = Past noon = Después del mediodía


1

Well it seems that the RAE says that the fomulation with an s (1920s) is outright incorrect in Spanish, and that it shoulnd't be used only because it is used in English. It explains that when you refer to a decade in Spanish you are explicitly referring to all 10 years 1920-1929 inclusive as an example. They say that you should say it in the following ...



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