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14

The examples you wrote about are not phrasal verbs. I don't think there is such a thing as phrasal verbs in Spanish. They are verbs that sometimes change their meaning totally. For example, the verb "to take" means that you grab something with your hands and you lift it up (an example). The verb "to take after" doesn't mean that you grab later, or at least ...


7

Yo soy de Madrid y tengo laísmo, leísmo y loísmo cuando hablo, pero si lo pienso (al escribir) suelo darme cuenta y lo corrijo. El laísmo, leísmo y loísmo está tan arraigado en Castilla que yo no me enteré que era laísta, leísta y loísta hasta que tuve 20 años. Correcto: Objeto directo masculino o neutro: siempre "lo" Objeto directo femenino: siempre "la" ...


5

If you check RAE you'll find the answer here and in this othe link with more details. Depending on the different grammars published there are different names. There are 2 simple tenses for past Pretérito imperfecto /Copretérito [de indicativo/ subjuntivo] (Pretérito imperfecto is the most used) E.g. En indicativo, amaba, temía, vivía; en ...


4

Debuccalization is a sound change that consists in a consonant losing its original place of articulation becoming [h] o [ʔ]. Saying place of articulation, we mean one of these: 1. Exo-labial, 2. Endo-labial, 3. Dental, 4. Alveolar, 5. Post-alveolar, 6. Pre-palatal, 7. Palatal, 8. Velar, 9. Uvular, 10. Pharyngeal, 11. Glottal, 12. Epiglottal, 13. ...


4

This is a kind of passive called "Pasiva refleja". "Pasiva refleja" is the passive voice most used in Spanish. RAE explains it here. The way of forming it Se + < transitive verb > + < nominal element > The verb will be always conjugated in 3rd person. If the nominal element is singular it will be 3rd person singular, but if that nominal element ...


3

Being from Argentina (next to Brasil) we use both without distinction. I can't assure you that's common outside South America (meaning the rest of Latin America and Spain), but I reckon Spanish speakers from all around will understand both without a problem. Now if you are writing for a newspaper or your PhD I'd suggest to use Brasileño, which is the former ...


3

I think because of the many similarities that spanish and portuguese language have, it was added to the spanish language the word brasilero, because the word for the citizen of brasil in portuguese is brasileiro. Your quotation says that the countries close to Brazil, are the ones saying brasilero, so that makes a lot of sense, because they are more in ...


3

Probably the easiest way to answer a question like this, is simply to read the Spanish version of the wiki page you linked in your question. Based on that, I believe the answer you seek is: Morfemas léxicos


3

Pretérito simply means past. RAE has an excellent explanation of all of them, but here's a very simplified summary. There are 3 different forms: Pretérito Perfecto (preterite perfect) Pretérito Imperfecto (preterite imperfect) Pretérito Pluscuamperfecto (pluperfect) In turn, preterite perfect subdivides in: a. Preterite [perfect] simple - Ex: ...


3

Those are simply refer to as adiciones (additions); the DPD recommends (under corchete) the use of square brackets to perform such additions: c) En la transcripción de un texto, se emplean para marcar cualquier interpolación o modificación en el texto original, como aclaraciones, adiciones, enmiendas o el desarrollo de abreviaturas: Hay otros [templos] ...


2

It looks like the grammatical term is actually periphrasis. Compound verbs and verb phrases both refer to different things. I came to this conclusion after viewing the translation on WordReference and the English Wikipedia article for periphrasis.


2

You can certainly find more in those links that Belisarius posted under your question, and probably in many other sites, but I'd like to give a quick explanation so you start understanding what they are: For the function of Indirect Object, in Spanish you should use "le" and "les". A María le he dado un libro. (I gave Maria a book.) For the function ...


2

En España "brasilero" no se usa nunca, o al menos yo nunca lo he escuchado de boca de alguien nacido en este lado del charco. Es más, creo que si a los españoles nos piden usar otra palabra en lugar de "brasileño", seguro que a la mayoría se nos vendría a la mente de forma espontánea "brasileiro","brazilian", o incluso "brésilien" pero no "brasilero".


2

Si tu coche tiene una baca (esa estructura metálica en forma de parrilla que puedes colocar sobre el techo de un automóvil, para llevar encima equipajes) mal atornillada, encima de la baca llevas una vaca (cosa difícil, pero lingüísticamente posible), y en una curva pierdes ambas, imagino que puedes decir (oralmente) "salieron despedidas las [b/v]acas" (los ...


1

In linguistics we normally call lema the headword of a word (that is, the way we would find it in a dictionary: its form in singular/masculine/infinitive). All the inflections of a lemma (plurals, conjugated verbs, etc) are called formas. So dog would be a lema, and its formas (word forms) would be dog and dogs.



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