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In Spanish, the order of the subject, verb, and associated objects or complements (such as adverbs) can be freely reordered.1 Modifiers to each of those elements, however, must remain where attached, relatively speaking, to their parent element. In this sentence, we have three "top level" elements: the subject (silla), the verb (está) and a locative ...


2

Verde here is an adjetivo sustantivado (i.e., an adjective that performs the function of a noun). You are not referring to a coloring (colorante o pigmento), but the color itself, and it is actually doing the job of a noun. In English you do this all the time. In Spanish it is way less common, but it happens. DRAE's entry for sustantivar leads to ...


1

Basically we are omitting a word here: Me gusta el (color) verde de tus ojos. color is the noun, and green is characterising the noun, so verde is an adjective.


0

From the DRAE (the dictionary of the Royal Spanish Academy) m. Colorante o pigmento utilizado para producir el color verde. So it is a noun


2

In latin there are also words formed by the union of other words, and it was quite common. The trick is, in latin the verb was positioned at the end of the sentence. So the compound words were something like calefactio or calefacio, that comes from calens (caliente, hot) and facio (from facere, hacer, to do), so calefacio is just a "hot maker". Notice that ...


1

It's just vocabulary. The same happens if you use parachoques = bumper, that's like saying que para los choques (here para = detiene) or words like know-it-all = sabelotodo. It's similar with the English compound nouns, you get to know them as a vocabulary. For instance, ashtray = cenicero, but nobody says bandeja para cenizas, because it's long and we can ...


1

Pescado can be uncountable referring to a general foodstuff: Comí pescado hoy But it can also be used as a countable referring to a single (caught) fish, in which case it can needs to be pluralized if more than one: Comí solo un pescado hoy. ¿Te crees? ¡Comí diez pescados hoy! In English, fish is invariable be it countable or uncountable. It ...



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