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4

No siempre tiene que haber "la" forma correcta de decir algo. Me refiero a que en este caso considero que las dos formas son correctas. Considero que se pueden usar ambas. No obstante a lo anterior (mi opinión), seguí la sugerencia de @CarlosAlejo, y como bien dice él y @AlexBcn, en la RAE se explica esto: Esta situación ocurre en los casos en que una ...


6

"Llover" is the verb "to rain". For example, Llueve mucho Means "it rains a lot". On the other hand, "la lluvia" is a noun which means "the rain". For example, No me gusta la lluvia Means "I do not like the rain".


2

I am not sure that I understand the question, but I'll take a go at it. As others said before, the word padre can never be used specifically for a female; you would use madre. The plural, padres, would include male and female, but padre, does not. This is consistent with the DRAE definition; the plural includes both sexes, but the singular does not. There ...


3

Here is a quick answer to a question that was a bit more challenging to answer than I had anticipated. Using my best estimates off of some pseudo-scientific research I conducted recently (link to potential paper/article and/or slide show to follow), my guess is that approximately .5 percent of nouns with feminine grammatical gender end in -o. In this study,...


2

Although you already selected one answer, I would like to bring more information. You can say uno de los padres for referring either the father or the mother, one of them, not they both together. Of course you can use any of the variations you can think of: El niño puede venir acompañado por cualquiera de los padres Uno de los padres debe firmar la ...


2

As in your previous question about "marido" you can not just change the article. "Padre" is masculine and to specifically refer to the female parent you use "madre". The plural "padres" refers to both parents male and female so for instance you could ask a child "¿dónde están tus padres? (where are your parents?) to ask for either or both. If you know ...


2

When I was a kid and the school would send a note to my parents the note would be addressed to the child's "padre, madre o encargado". Googling around I found that in Argentina they use the even longer form "padre, madre, tutor o encargado" It appears there is no single word that can refer to a generic parent of undetermined gender. In normal speech "padre ...


6

"Marida" as a noun does not exist in Spanish. The word "marido" is commonly used in pair with "mujer". If you want the male and female words to be of the same root, you can use "esposo/esposa". The term "cónyuge" can be used for both male and female. Source: http://www.wikilengua.org/index.php/esposo


6

There are words that have masculine and feminine but there are others that don't. Even in English you have horse and mare (caballo yegua), bull and cow (toro vaca), husband and wife (marido y mujer / esposo y esposa) For the feminine of "marido" we use among others: cónyuge, mujer, señora, compañera, consorte, esposa, pareja, costilla, media naranja (the ...


-1

That's really hard to say, I don't believe there's any "scientific" way to prove this or that. And besides that, why do you need to know the exactly percent? Would that make you speak better spanish? I like to say better that most of the nouns that end in -a are feminine and most of the nouns ending in -o are masculine. Or otherwise, few of the nouns ...



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