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6

Those sentences are actually impersonal sentences. There is no implied subject. Impersonal sentences are those in which none of the elements of the sentence can be the subject, nor have or could be supposed an implicit subject. Some examples of impersonal sentences would be: En esta biblioteca hay mucho ruido Hay muchos pájaros en ese árbol And ...


5

No difference at all. That is one of the big differences between Spanish and English: We are able to remove those whenever we both know who/what we are talking about. If you said it in your first sentence or it is obvious from the context, we can remove it. In English you ALWAYS have to use them. In fact, using a pronoun all the time sounds like a person ...


5

"Gato", and its feminine form "gata", are the normal way of referring to animals of the Felis silvestris catus subspecies. "Gatita" is a normal way of referring to one's female cat, or any other female cat to which one has sentimental attachment. On the other hand, the same words "gata" and "gatita" can be used to refer to a woman. This second usage is, at ...


5

Si buscas un término apropiado acorde a las definiciones de la RAE, lo mas cercano sería detectable. detectable adj. Que se puede detectar. detectar (Del ingl. to detect). tr. Descubrir la existencia de algo que no era patente. Ahora bien, derivando de estos términos podríamos traducir discoverability como detectabilidad ...


4

English The -ito ending, like most diminuitives, is productive. As syrux points out, there are other ones that are used more commonly in other areas and tend to be equally as productive (to his list can also be added -iño from Galicia and -ingo from the Andes). When we say a suffix is productive, that means that, theoretically, it can be added to any word ...


4

Gavin, I am also a beginner learner of Spanish, and I also have been mystified about the use of el, la, los and las. I have come to the conclusion that they are no simple rules to determine when they need to be used, and when not; otherwise they would be in every beginners textbook, wouldn't they? This is what I have surmised, picking up morsels of ...


4

Spanish is called a pro-drop language. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pro-drop_language That means you don't need to actually write the subject pronoun. After all, in Spanish verbs have different forms depending on the subject. (yo) voy (tú) vas (él / ella / usted) va (nosotros / nosotras) vamos (vosotros / vosotras) vais (ellos ...


3

In cases like this, sometimes it seems that certain words refer to things more important than others, but is explained by the simple use of capital letters in proper nouns. Alá es el dios de los musulmanes y Dios es el dios de los cristianos. Lowercase dios refers to some powerful spiritual being. Uppercase Dios refers to the name given to that spirit ...


3

En España es almohadilla, pero no se suele usar mucho ya que ya existe la abreviatura/símbolo N.º (y sus variaciones núm. y nro.) con el mismo significado. De hecho, la primera vez que aparece en una obra de la RAE es con el DPD aunque ese indica que se utiliza en las Américas como equivalente a N.º. Ahora también sale en la edición más moderna del ...


2

There is an implied action: empanar. It means, according to DRAE, empanar. 1. tr. Encerrar algo en masa o pan para cocerlo en el horno. So there you are. Indeed the implied noun is (drums)... algo, i.e. whatever fits inside the bread. It could be meat. But there's no fixed implied known. But the fact that the bread should be stuffed leads to the ...


2

There is no implied noun, other than possibly the ambiguous "one" or "thing," as in: Breaded one or Breaded thing The exact same thing happens in English (and probably every other language) when we use an adjective form in the place of a noun to describe something by its primary characteristic. Some obvious examples from Spanish, and their ...


2

They aren't actually gender neutral nouns in Spanish except adjectives that have been forced into nouns like lo bueno. Neuter gender would mean they'd use the article lo, or would always use a neuter adjective form (which is -o, it matches the masculine one). Of the Romance languages, only Asturian and Romanian have significant use for the neuter with ...


2

To expound a bit on the other answers, and address one specific part of the question: Or is it a regional dialect/slang? The grammatical use of -ita / -ito is universal, however the idiomatic use of certain words is anything but! As an example mentioned in your question, "ahorita" is the normal way, in Mexico, to say "Right now" or "In just a moment" ...


2

En México se llama signo de número, o simplemente número y gato. El primer nombre se dice generalmente a la hora de poner números de casas y cosas por el estilo y gato cuando se usa para otras cosas como marcar números de teléfono y claro el novedoso hashtag que solo se usa para... hashtags.


2

This is a working answer — there will be updates to it (I'll remove this when I think it's done). Throughout this, I use the standard asterisk in front of a statement that is not grammatical. 1. What is a determiner? A determiner is a word that goes with a noun let's us know which, if any, (out of all of those nouns in the whole of existance), we're ...


2

I don't know if that would be of any help, but in ICAO (and, as far as I know, in other UN bodies) Spanish translators use "seguridad operacional", whenever there's "safety" in the English document and simply "seguridad", when it is "security". The difference between the two being that safety (seguridad operacional) is understood as inherent or built-in ...


2

I think you would be capitalizing it if it was singular, because then you would be referring to El Cielo, as the specific (and unique of its kind) place where souls go, because you would be referring to the place by its name (proper noun). The "cielos" in plural there has the same meaning as seas, it means "all of them", "the many of them", but obviously ...


1

Safety: cuidado, atención, seguridad (en el sentido de "tener precaución"). Es una acción que realiza el agente para evitar el riesgo. Security: seguridad (en el sentido de que "existen las condiciones"). Es un estado del contexto en el que el agente se expone al riesgo. "Juan camina con cuidado, y usa zapatos de seguridad"


1

When we ignore the pronoun this is what we call sujeto eliptico. El verbo informa del número y la persona del sujeto, se omite cuando se sobrentiende: se trata del llamado sujeto elíptico. No es que no haya sujeto, sino que este se da por supuesto. But take care in some sentences like Yo leía mucho , if we drop yo then leía mucho can be used for the ...


1

Aquí es donde la morfología entra en acción morph(del griego forma) y logía (ciencia) Definición de morfología por la RAE: Parte de la gramática que se ocupa de la estructura de las palabras. Así pues morfología de los determinantes sería correcto: Determinante: Se suele llamar determinante a una función sintáctica desempeñada por diversos tipos de ...


1

No En Español los sufijos diminutivos marcan generalmente tamaño pequeño, juventud, cariño o desdén pero no hay un estudio definitivo y las pautas se obedecen en gran medida a los usos locales o particulares del hablante. Sobre el uso de ahorita: uno de los casos más comunes es "ahorita"; que usado especialmente en Méjico para indicar urgencia, es usado ...


1

I am from México and "gato" and "gata" in reference to a person is very desrespectful: No soy tu gato. I am not your servant, worker, maid or something like that. "Gato" y "gata" is used to talk about poor people. And "Gata" and "Gatita" are used as whore. In argentina is the same meaning for memenine and masculine form


1

If they do not precede the other consonant, form the plural with -es. And example is "dócil"; it becomes "dóciles". However, words such as "bufanda" (scarf), end with a vowel. In this case, you can simply just add an "s" at the end.



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