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I am from Argentina and I never say or hear "el Chile", but "la Argentina" is quite accepted and used. The standard explanation of this apparent anomality is that "Argentina" is originally an adjective, tied to the (often tacit) substantive "República", so that the full expression would be "la República Argentina" (analogously to "los Estados Unidos"). ...


2

In many dialects (or forms, if you wish) of Spanish, the S before a consonant transforms into an aspirated sound very similar to the english H. So imagine something like Jesuhcristo and it's only logical that it ends up like Jesucristo * Yes, the S in Cristo could have suffered the same process, so there's a hole in my theory. :D


1

I think, in this case, you can ommit the article. As MikMik says, it's common in Spain use the article when you mention a restaurant: Ayer cené en el Fridays - Ayer cené en el [restaurante] Fridays If you mention the restaurant as a space, colloquially you usually will hear: Que opinas del [restaurante] Fridays? But, if you are mentioning the ...


1

The name of the restaurant is a proper name, and therefor, formally, it isn't written with an article. At the other hand, you might hear a lot of people using an article. Certainly when people get familiar with a certain place or when it is a place everybody knows, they will probably use an article (although this might also be geographically dependent). If ...


1

The names of some places, such as "El Salvador", "El Cairo" or "La Haya" always include the article (just as "The Hague" does in English). For some others you can optionally add the article, the RAE lists several examples in the page about the definite article "el". (el) Afganistán, (el) África, (la) Argentina, (el) Asia, (el) Brasil, (el) Camerún, (el) ...



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