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10

The Latin Iesus is an irregular form of the 4th declension. (The Latin declensions are like verb conjugations in Spanish, but applied to nouns). Iesus is in the singular nominative case: the "name" of the word (as seek it in the dictionary) and the form it takes when is grammatical nucleus of subject. Iesum is in singular acusative (like direct complement). ...


6

I am from Argentina and I never say or hear "el Chile", but "la Argentina" is quite accepted and used. The standard explanation of this apparent anomality is that "Argentina" is originally an adjective, tied to the (often tacit) substantive "República", so that the full expression would be "la República Argentina" (analogously to "los Estados Unidos"). ...


4

Se nos están acumulando las preguntas sin respuesta en Unsanswered. Oh desastre, ¡atajémoslo ya! Googling for Memoria de mis putas tristes and Cargamantos reveals what people is saying in the comments to your question: this is just the surname of a certain character in the book, called Doña Florina de Dios Cargamantos. So when García Márquez says: ... ...


3

Rota, la isla de Rota, isla de Rota are ok, even isla Rota. If the place is renown you could omit isla (e.g. Madagascar, Mallorca, Gran Canaria, Galápagos). Sometimes it sounds nicer to compound the name adding isla (or islas) but again, unless the name of the place includes the word isla (e.g. Isla de Margarita, Isla de Pascua) then you can omit it.


3

According to the Wikipedia, it can be "Fulano de Tal", "Juan Pérez" or "Juan del Pueblo".


2

"Fulano or Fulana De Tal" is the legally accepted name for official documents.


2

Also used are "Mengano", "Zutano", "Perengano" and "Perico de los Palotes".


2

In many dialects (or forms, if you wish) of Spanish, the S before a consonant transforms into an aspirated sound very similar to the english H. So imagine something like Jesuhcristo and it's only logical that it ends up like Jesucristo * Yes, the S in Cristo could have suffered the same process, so there's a hole in my theory. :D


2

The names of some places, such as "El Salvador", "El Cairo" or "La Haya" always include the article (just as "The Hague" does in English). For some others you can optionally add the article, the RAE lists several examples in the page about the definite article "el". (el) Afganistán, (el) África, (la) Argentina, (el) Asia, (el) Brasil, (el) Camerún, (el) ...


2

He encontrado una referencia en la Enciclopedia Católica Online que menciona al libro "Origin of the Name of Jesus Christ", Maas, Anthony. The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 8. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08374x.htm. Esta referencia incide en el hecho de que "Jesús" era un nombre común en la época y que "Cristo" era ...


1

I think, in this case, you can ommit the article. As MikMik says, it's common in Spain use the article when you mention a restaurant: Ayer cené en el Fridays - Ayer cené en el [restaurante] Fridays If you mention the restaurant as a space, colloquially you usually will hear: Que opinas del [restaurante] Fridays? But, if you are mentioning the ...


1

The name of the restaurant is a proper name, and therefor, formally, it isn't written with an article. At the other hand, you might hear a lot of people using an article. Certainly when people get familiar with a certain place or when it is a place everybody knows, they will probably use an article (although this might also be geographically dependent). If ...


1

lt might come from Latin, perhaps because all the declensions but two are Iesu (nominative Iesus, and accusative Iesum), v.g. Jesu Christi. This might have lead to a hyphenated use in Spanish as Jesu-Christo. The RAE erased the h. And, I don't know when or how, it got merged. (Still, I realize it's just a theory. Somehow I managed to be sure, so I checked ...



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