Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

ísimo/ma is a Latin suffix that can be appended to some adjectives and adverbs to form their superlatives: malísimo, riquísimo. The rules governing the use of the ísimo suffix are the following: For adjectives ending in l, r, and z, simply add the suffix (changing the final z for a c): fácil, facilísimo. feroz, ferocísimo. popular, ...


9

The -azo/za suffix has four different functions: As an augmentative: perrazo, manaza (a big dog, a big hand). As a pejorative: aceitazo (dense and turbid oil). It can express a hit given with the object represented by the word to which it is appended: martillazo (a hit given with a hammer), almohadazo (a hit given with a pillow). Sometimes, it can also ...


7

Common sufixes: Taken from "Sufijos nominales en español", from Lucie Rossowová's Master Thesis, p. 30: Noun suffixes denoting the "agent" of the action: -ero/-era (cocinero / cocinera) -dor/-dora (cazador / cazadora) -ante (cantante) -ista (deportista) We could add some other examples (some of them may be "allomorphs" of another one): -or/-ora ...


7

All those word-roots have Latin origins as follows: duco : I lead voco : I call loco : I place ludo : I play mitto : I send Since most of those words have English cognates, I point you to the Internet Wayback Machine's link to the American Heritage Dictionary, which used to be free online, and had good etymologies.


6

Actually Gonzalo's nice answer doesn't cover one part of the story fully. It's not that Spanish has two ways to express the superlative of adjectives - rather Spanish, like Latin, most modern Romance languages, and also Ancient Greek has two different kinds of superlatives: The relative superlative This is the more familiar one with más: El más grande It ...


6

The proper way to say it is the following: Veracidad As kevin said his examples are very good. But I am afraid that verdaderosidad does not exist or certizidad or veracecinidad. The proper word is veracidad even if no so fancy as the invented versions. As gonzalo said per comments, certeza is a good alternative. The problem is that in Spanish we ...


4

Como ya ha contestado @bluish, -filo proviene del griego antiguo que expresa una clase de amor o inclinación hacia algo. -mano (también) proviene del griego antiguo, y expresa una clase de locura hacia algo. Por otro lado, en línea con lo que comenta @leonbloy, las elecciones de los prefijos y sufijos no siempre siguen una regla fija. Un ejemplo sencillo ...


4

Colbert Report fan, eh? This is a tough one. I looked to color words, many of which have an -ish equivalent, which is what we're looking for here. We have: rojizo - reddish blanquizo/blanquecino/blancuzco - whitish azulado - bluish verdoso - greenish negruzco - blackish amarillente/amarilloso - yellowish I don't know the technical name of the ...


3

-filo viene de filia (griego) que es una especie de amor hacia algo. -mano viene de manía (griego) que es una especie de locura hacia algo (es más fuerte). Además de melómano (que parece estar vinculado con la ópera) podrías utilizar musicómano. Sin embargo, parece ser que no hay musicófilo, que resultaría más suave. ¡En el peor de los casos estarías ...


1

El sufijo -filo viene del griego. Un sufijo relacionado es -filia. Ver el comentario en Wikipedia. http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filia



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible