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Well, your second sentence made sense, but it doesn't make sense. (get? tense joke...) Old Spanish allowed the use of future subjunctive in this situation just like modern Portuguese and Galician do. Compare: Cuando tuviere más dinero, comprarélo. (castellano áurico) Quando tiver mais dinheiro, comprá-lo-ei. (português moderno) Cando tiver mais ...


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This is a somewhat advanced topic in Spanish, and a not so easy one. A brief explanation is: Cumpla is the present tense of subjunctive mood of the verb cumplir for both the first and third persons singular. Check its conjugation with RAE. When you use the conjunction cuando to join both the main and the subordinated sentence, you are faced with two ...


1

You may hear people say future tense as such, but probably more likely due to influence from conditional (which exists in an odd modal space and can be used naturally there). Present subjunctive can stand in for either present or future temporal references: Es probable que llueva [ahora | luego] Because you've started your sentence with a present tense ...


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The succinct answer is: when you have the conjunction que, splitting a whole phrase in tho parts, each one with its own verb, then the main one must be in the indicative mood, and the second one in the subjunctive mood. So, the sentence you gave: It is likely that he will continue to develop Can be translated as: Es probable que él continúe ...


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It's not a matter of time delay. It has to do with the fact that the sentence is discussing the action that would be the effect, without making any assertion about whether that effect has happened, is happening, or will happen at a known time in the future. The indicative is used to indicate that an action has happened, is happening, or will happen ...


3

Subjunctive implies subjectivity, uncertainty or grammatical subordination. In a reason/result relationship where there is some sort of imperative implied, the result is subordinate to the reason (depends upon it). For example, 'La lluvia hace que use mi paraguas' includes an imperative relationship between the rain and my having to use an umbrella. ...


4

About this particular case, you can leave the second subjunctive out: "Era importante que adulara ... si quería ...". Subjunctive after si is used only when the situation is unlikely, and in that case the si part almost always starts the sentence. Also, you "step back" a tense, so, if you are talking about now, you use the imperfect: Si quisiera [now] ...


3

As you are not satisfied with the traditional explanation, let me try to give one that is more visual: Lets define four moments in time : t0: when the sentence is said t1: time the sentence is referring to ts: study period te: exam period So your first construction ('estudie') can mean the orders: t0->t1->ts->te or t0->ts->t1->te And the second ...


3

You could say Era importante adular a los profesores si querías buenas notas. It was important to flatter my teachers if you wanted to get good grades. No need of subjunctive. You are just explaining how things were in the past. You could say Sería importante adular a los profesores si quisiera buenas notas. It would be important o flatter my ...


3

En este caso, no está en cuestión el subjuntivo, sino el aspecto. Cuando dices haya estudiado, la interpretación es que cualquier estudio que hayas hecho habría ocurrido antes del momento de la oración. Es algo que escucharás, por ejemplo, cuando ya viene el examen pronto y se supone que no queda tiempo para estudiar más. Ya que queda casi completamente en ...


2

The first example (future) is definitely not correct. It will be correct if you truly know it won't rain: "No lloverá mañana". The second example is OK. 'Futuro' and 'Subjuntivo' are types of different facets of the verbal construction: 'Futuro' indicates tense and 'Subjuntivo' indicates mode. The future you are using is from the 'Indicativo' mode which ...



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