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11

El uso del subjuntivo con valor de indicativo es bastante común en el periodismo, aunque se considera incorrecto y la mayoría de los manuales de estilo lo desaconsejan. Por último, el que más espacio dedica a la advertencia sobre ese mal uso es nuestro Manual de Español Urgente: "No debe aparecer en los despachos de la agencia la forma cantara como ...


9

Subtle... Mientras llueve, escucho música. (llueve: indicative) While it rains, I listen to music Mientras llueva, me quedaré en casa. (llueva: subjunctive ) As long as it rains, I'll stay at home. "Mientras + indicative" implies mere simultaneity (at the same time something happens, another thing takes place). "Mientras + ...


8

Como comenta Javi, es un error de la aplicación. Puedes checar en la RAE que las formas correctas son: yo adelgace tú adelgaces él adelgace nosotros adelgacemos vosotros/ustedes adelgacéis / adelgacen ellos adelgacen


8

I believe the literal equivalent "that" used to be used in formal English but has now all but disappeared. Wiktionary gives this definition for this sense of English "that": (archaic) Introducing a hypothetical fact or supposition: ‘given that’, ‘as would appear from the fact that’. [from 11th c.] It can be thought of as a kind of subjunctive ...


8

¿Requiérese el subjuntivo? No. ¿Admítese el subjuntivo? Sí. Doyte un ejemplo que creo que te lo hará claro. La cosa de las mujeres que me gusta es que me inviten a salir con ellas. (hablo de las mujeres en general; soy viejísimo, feísimo y paupérrimo y hay una escasa posibilidad de que me hablen) La cosa de las mujeres que me gusta es que me ...


7

No, not indicative nor subjunctive. If you give an order or a request, the verb is conjugated in the imperative. The problem is that in the second person singular, the imperative has two forms depending on formality of the context Example in Latin American way: ¡Para, por favor!: you're talking to someone familiarly, without differences of rank or age. ...


6

This bears a direct correspondence to the classic confusion between subjuntive and conditional, for hypothetical situations: Si pidieras ayuda, tus cosas marcharían mejor. (If you asked for help, things would go better) (Present Unreal Conditional) This is the correct form for the present case (subjuntive/conditional). It would be clearly wrong to ...


6

Well... it's pretty... subjective and probably complex to explain to English native speakers, but I would say that When I use the subjunctive mood, I am expressing some conditional idea or desire. Actually, why not... ...When I use the subjunctive mood, I am expressing doubt, uncertainty, emotion, desire, recommendation, denial, or disbelief ...


6

Español El "futuro simple de subjuntivo" es un tiempo verbal cuya función es expresar una acción que: Aún no ocurre. Hay alguna posibilidad de que ocurra en el futuro. Estas características no son posibles de expresar por ningún otro tiempo verbal de manera directa, y para acercarse a ello, necesitarían algunos adverbios o adicionales o simplemente ...


6

This can be a very involved topic, and it would take pages to discuss all the nuances (see any Spanish grammar book). But the basic idea, as Wikipedia puts it, is: The subjunctive of a verb is used to express certain connotations in sentences such as a wish or desire, a demand, an emotion, uncertainty, or doubt. The subjunctive is technically a ...


6

The Diccionario panhispánico de dudas explains that there are two major types of voseo: Reverential voseo: archaic and ceremonial usage. Spanish speakers in the Americas are familiar with this type of voseo from historic and religious texts. American dialectal voseo: the different forms of voseo from the Spanish dialects of the Americas. The Diccionario ...


6

El imperfecto de subjuntivo tiene dos conjugaciones posibles, pero las dos son válidas y equivalentes. Es decir, las dos significan exactamente lo mismo y pueden ser intercambiadas, no hay ninguna distinción. En tu ejemplo, por tanto, los dos verbos significan lo mismo: Sí hubiera/hubiese sabido que iba a llover, me habría quedado en casa. Puedes ...


6

Sería correcto hubieran, en caso de que se refirieran a ellos/ellas. Me alegraba que hubieran tenido tanta suerte. En este caso, se refiere a un hecho impersonal, haber elecciones, por lo que siempre va a ser hubiera/hubiese.


6

The word usted is derived from the ancient expression vuestra merced (your mercy), which was used to politely/formally address other people several centuries ago. When you addressed someone as vuestra merced, you were not directly addressing them, but something else ("their mercy"); hence the use of the 3rd person that has been kept to our days. Many other ...


6

Es cierto que hay dos formas, pero solo una de las que tienes en tu pregunta se admite. Entretener viene del prefijo entre y la palabra base tener. Por eso, tiene las mismas irregularidades que tiene su base: entretén (del imp. ten), entretengo (de pres. ind. tengo), entretendré (de fut. ind. tendré), etcétera. La flexión para la tercera persona plural del ...


5

Your friend is correct and both statements are correctly translated in the quesitons. I can't tell you why (as in historically where these things came from) the subjunctive is not used in your "present tense" example. I can give you some more examples and rules about the subjunctive in this case. First, the subjunctive is used for expressing uncertainty ...


5

In the lyrics the people might or might not be saying that he is a gangster. Using subjunctive keeps the uncertainty. If they had chosen the indicative, they would be stating that the people are actually saying that already. And, in both cases, although people say so, "I thank God for being where I am".


4

El problema es el subjuntivo. Por lo general, la respuesta correcta es tal y como señala Alenanno: "habría". Y lo correcto (por lo general) es "habría" pues debemos tener en cuenta que una frase con todos los verbos en modo subjuntivo es una frase incompleta (a menos que se pueda completar tácitamente por el contexto) que deja al interlocutor esperando que ...


4

A very reduced explanation of the use of subjunctive tense in Spanish, is related to the subordinated sentences explained in Spanish syntax. When you're using subordinated sentences, its verb is usually conjugated in subjunctive tense while the main sentence's verb is conjugated in indicative. When you must analyze the specific cases when subjunctive tense ...


4

The advice I was always given was that there is no difference in the meaning, but to stick to one of them (ie don't mix and match) in a conversation/piece of text.


4

I think that estar is a tricky verb for the example as I've said in the comments. I agree with fedorqui on sentence #1 Si pudieras vivir donde quisieras, ¿Dónde vivirías? In sentences #2 and #3 your problem is that you are looking for concordance in the subordinate sentence (the one introduced by que), and while you certainly cannot use any tense, ...


4

About this particular case, you can leave the second subjunctive out: "Era importante que adulara ... si quería ...". Subjunctive after si is used only when the situation is unlikely, and in that case the si part almost always starts the sentence. Also, you "step back" a tense, so, if you are talking about now, you use the imperfect: Si quisiera [now] ...


4

The succinct answer is: when you have the conjunction que, splitting a whole phrase in tho parts, each one with its own verb, then the main one must be in the indicative mood, and the second one in the subjunctive mood. So, the sentence you gave: It is likely that he will continue to develop Can be translated as: Es probable que él continúe ...


4

Si quieres... is the right way to say it. Always. Meaning If you want... Si quieras... simply does not make sense (at least in Spain). It is true that it can be understood (as @EmilioGort mentions) like you think that the person who you are talking to probably does not want what you are asking. But this is some kind of interpretation. It could be something ...


4

The subjunctive is used in modern Spanish virtually exclusively in subordinate clauses.1 For this reason, the main clause of any question is in the indicative. However, what you're thinking about does come into play with certain types of questions where subjunctive would not be allowed in the declarative counterpart: ¿Crees que exista Dios? — Sí, creo ...


4

Sí, puedes usar el subjuntivo en esos casos, tanto presente como pretérito: Sugiero que hagas una herramienta que pueda resolver el problema (o que resuelva el problema). Nos vendría bien tener una herramienta que pudiese resolver el problema (o resolviese el problema). El subjuntivo se usa para expresar probabilidad y duda. Date cuenta de que lo ...


3

I'd say: Si lo hubieran anotado, después no les habría costado tanto recordarlo. But, although it seems weird to me, according to my Spanish grammar book, in the second one you can use: condicional simple, pretérito imperfecto, condicional compuesto (indicativo) and pluscuamperfecto.


3

Si (yo/él/usted) hubiera sido rico, hubiera/habría comprado un carro. This means that if you would have been rich at that time you would have bought the car. This can imply that the situation might have changed. For example you may no longer interested in buying the car. But if at that time the condition would have been true you would have done it. The ...


3

I found an article that explains it really well. But your second example "que reunamos a las 6" sound wrong to me, maybe in some context can be right but not standing alone. Edit: sorry, didn't see the comments until after I answered.



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