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17

The difference is that an adjective placed before a noun acts as an attribute and after a noun it acts as a modifier. There are some rules as to the position of the adjective, as follows: Demonstrative, posessive and indefinite adjectives and articles go before the noun. E.g., Mis tres amigas vienen a la fiesta or Este nivel de español es intermedio. ...


12

Este tipo de pronombres que funcionan como complemento verbal no preposicional se denominan, en general, pronombres clíticos. Cuando anteceden al verbo (me encanta; lo dijo; se fue) se llaman proclíticos y cuando siguen al verbo (ayúdame, díselo, vete) se llaman enclíticos. La colocación de los pronombres clíticos delante o detrás del verbo no es libre, ...


11

"Te va encantar" is gramatically incorrect. I had never heard it before, at least in Spain. The sentence should be: Te va a encantar as it has a future meaning Ir a + infinitive = going to + infinitive Probably it's a mistake made because we link the words when speaking so "te va a encantar" would be pronounced as "te va-a encantar", we say it ...


11

Use the pronoun when it clarifies an ambiguity: Leería el libro. This is vague without further context. It could mean "I would read the book" or "He/she would read the book." So the addition of a pronoun (or other context) is necessary. Or use a pronoun for emphasis. Él leyó el libro. Yo leí la revista. "He read the book. I read the ...


11

The compound verb "ir a" is roughly the same as "going to" in English: we primarily use it when talking about the immediate future. ¿Va a comprar un coche nuevo? Are you going to buy a new car? (= Have you decided to buy a new car?) Here you can find a detailed analysis of different ways to express the future. They do not elaborate on regional ...


10

The difference is simple: Deber + infinitive is used to express obligation: You must do it as soon as possible. Deber de + infinitive is used to express probability or supposition: It must be very early. Sometimes, in the second case the preposition "de" is omitted, so it might be confusing. So the first case could also be interpretated as the ...


8

Remember that "gustar" means "to please" unlike the English "like" which essentially means "to be pleased by." So what you're saying is: Is reading pleasing to your children? When you state it this way, the obvious translation becomes: ¿Leer les gusta a vuestros hijos? And then the necesity of the 'a' becomes more clear, as in this case it is a ...


8

El niño debe hacer su tarea. This sentence means obligation: The kid must do his job. A similar sentence could be "El niño tiene que hacer su tarea." El niño debe de hacer su tarea. The construction "deber de" means supposition or possibility. I'm not sure this usage applies to your example as is. But another example can be: Deben de ser ...


6

Both sentences are correct. The first one is a more colloquial wording, and the second one is more formal. According to section 4.10 of the article Concordancia from the Diccionario Panhispánico de Dudas: If the subject of the verb ser is a first or second person singular pronoun (yo, tú/vos), the verb of the relative clause can be either in the ...


6

The correct order can be remembered by the acronym RID (as in, "I need to get RID of this confusion about pronouns!") for reflexive, indirect, direct. All three pronouns can't appear together, but two can in the following combinations: Reflexive-Indirect: Se me olvidó. ("I forgot." or literally "It forgot itself to me.") Reflexive-Direct: Me lo pongo. ("I ...


6

I guess @Gonzalo has answered your question from the correct, formal and theorical point of view. However, I wish to share my thoughts since I am a native speaker. @KevinK said: the latter sentence ["¿Lo quieres hacer?"] also looks natural but the meaning is more of confirming the wanting vs. asking if they want to do it at all About this, I use to ...


6

Your two examples are actually different phenomena. Ex. 1) ¿A vuestros hijos les gusta leer? Consider the following statements: Me gusta leer. Me gusta leer a mí. A mí, me gusta leer. You can always add the a mí for emphasis. Similarly, you can add an "a [person]" to clarify who the pronoun refers to, in the more ambiguous case of les. Ex. 2) Todos ...


5

This bears a direct correspondence to the classic confusion between subjuntive and conditional, for hypothetical situations: Si pidieras ayuda, tus cosas marcharían mejor. (If you asked for help, things would go better) (Present Unreal Conditional) This is the correct form for the present case (subjuntive/conditional). It would be clearly wrong to ...


5

I think the book explanation is good. But for simplicity use it at the beginning of the paragraph (to clarify it's you) and no more. For example I think it's important because I want to be able to do it. Yo creo que es importante porque quiero ser capaz de hacerlo. Also, the verb itself told you if its explicit the need to use the "Yo". Using ...


4

There is, indeed a regional preference. In Argentina, for example, ir a ... is almost always used in spoken language, and the future tense only appears in writing. You are likely to find the future tense used in speech in Spain, for example. Both forms are acceptable anyway.


4

Al responder, para "una" se utiliza en singular pero para las demás horas se usa en plural. Ejemplo: Es la una (de la tarde/mañana). Son las dos (de la tarde/mañana). Sin embargo la pregunta siempre va en singular. Ejemplo: Pregunta: ¿A qué hora es la salida? Respuesta 1: A las seis. Respuesta 2: La hora de salida es a las seis. ...


3

Those are simply refer to as adiciones (additions); the DPD recommends (under corchete) the use of square brackets to perform such additions: c) En la transcripción de un texto, se emplean para marcar cualquier interpolación o modificación en el texto original, como aclaraciones, adiciones, enmiendas o el desarrollo de abreviaturas: Hay otros [templos] ...


3

Por lo general, por el uso que le damos aquí en España, al menos en mi ámbito. Alguien se toma un tiempo para hacer algo. Algo lleva un tiempo. Es decir, al menos para mí es más natural usar el lleva un tiempo más que el toma un tiempo. Pero generalmente nos encontramos con diferentes caso depende de la región, he escuchando a muchos latinoamericanos ...


3

In the book, Advanced Spanish Step by Step written by Barbara Bregstein, on page 188, she writes: "the simple future transmits more of a commitment or a strong decision than does the future periphrastic (ir+a+infinitive). The difference also exists in English: I will arrive at 7 p.m. is a little stronger than I am going to arrive at 7 p.m.


3

El problema es el subjuntivo. Por lo general, la respuesta correcta es tal y como señala Alenanno: "habría". Y lo correcto (por lo general) es "habría" pues debemos tener en cuenta que una frase con todos los verbos en modo subjuntivo es una frase incompleta (a menos que se pueda completar tácitamente por el contexto) que deja al interlocutor esperando que ...


2

I'd say: Si lo hubieran anotado, después no les habría costado tanto recordarlo. But, although it seems weird to me, according to my Spanish grammar book, in the second one you can use: condicional simple, pretérito imperfecto, condicional compuesto (indicativo) and pluscuamperfecto.


2

A few observations: you have a direct object and an indirect object in your sentence. Just go to the passive voice: La cara (de la niña) es lavada por la madre. So, "la cara" is the direct object. You can now replace the indirect object by "le" La cara le es lavada por la madre. If you omit "le", the subject disappears: La cara es lavada por ...


2

Tal como yo entiendo estas frases, dependen del tiempo verbal en que estén conjugadas: Usadas en tiempo presente: Tomar un tiempo: se refiere al hecho de gastar u ocupar un lapso de tiempo para realizar una determinada tarea. El énfasis está en el tiempo que ocupa después de haber sido concluída. Podríamos relacionarlo con el aspecto perfectivo. ...


2

It's not acceptable in formal writing, but we do that all the time. You cannot say it's incorrect. It is not. "Salida coches" and "Venta garage" is perfect Spanish for a sign. I'm punctilious (we all at StackExchange are, aren't we?) and, if I'm writing a report, the heading would be "Notificación de enfermedades infecciosas": I would never dream of ...


2

I'd say that they have the same meaning, the order in this case doesn't affect it because you're equalling both terms. Maybe if you were comparing people and you were one of them, "yourself" should be used in the last place because there's a proverb which says: El burro delante para que no se espante which means that it's impolite to name in ...


2

Yo prefiero, igual que la mayoría de los hablantes, la primera opción. Hay al menos dos problemas aquí Primero: la eterna duda singular-plural para designar un instante horario. Es claro que "las seis (horas)" es plural, gramaticalmente hablando. Sin embargo generalmente se usa como sintagma singular. Y es lógico, ya que en la mayoría de los usos (como el ...


2

La opción 3 es la que mejor suena: El paciente, curado y contento, saldrá del hospital recientemente establecido. La opción 1 es válida tambien. Normalmente se pone el adjetivo después del nombre, de manera que, por regla general, debes preferir "paciente curado" a "curado paciente", excepto en canciones y textos poéticos. En otro orden de cosas, un ...


2

Es correcto que el sujeto de la oración subordinada es «esa sonrisa fría». El pronombre «se» tiene una función reflexiva (aunque podría pensarse también como una voz media1.): Esa sonrisa fría se cierra. En este caso la sonrisa también es el objeto directo (qué es lo que es cerrado) y el «le» es por lo tanto el complemento indirecto (a quién o para ...



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