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1

The fact that you saw this on a sign for a business, which is marketing basically, let's me know that they're attempting to cater to two audiences. Those that are familiar with computers Those that are not. Contraption = Ordenador This word comes to mind when I think of an English translation. As many have already suggested, the word is used ...


3

When contar doesn't mean - to count - it means to tell.. specifically a story. Háblame simply means talk to me, and in some cases - tell me. For instance, if you were giving someone the cold shoulder, they might get upset and tell you to "Say something!" The same sense as when you are in class, you raise your hand, and the teacher says "Let's hear what ...


2

En este caso específico "háblame" se refiere a hablar, o decir algunas palabras; sin embargo "cuéntame" aparte de incluir la acción de hablar se refiere a que se narre o converse sobre un hecho o una historia, lleva el significado adicional de la narración de un evento.


2

contar RAE has as an entry for it: tr. Poner a alguien en el número, clase u opinión que le corresponde. Siempre te he contado entre los mejores. in which the basic usage is to account of quantitatively or qualitatively. It is about as close as I notice to the correct entry for the actual, primary use of contar in spoken spanish. ...


5

«Hablar» is to speak, so «háblame» is urging someone to say anything. I wouldn't normally use it for to tell, which is «contar» (among other meanings). «Cuéntame» expects that someone to say something concrete. Estás muy callado, háblame. Just break the silence. Estás muy callado, cuéntame. Do you have something to tell me? «Contar» can have a D.O. ...


1

I Colombia both COMPUTADORA and ORDENADOR means the same, and also the word MICROCOMPUTADOR, usually used in its abbreviated form MICRO. However, in current language we use the word COMPUTADOR when referring to a PC and PORTATIL when referring to a laptop. Words like COMPUTADORA, ORDENADOR, MICROCOMPUTADOR and MICRO are used by old folks who learnt ...


0

"Computadora" is the term used by most Spanish speakers. "Ordenador" is the term used in Spain. This case is similar to "flashlight" and "torch," "truck" and "lorry," etc.


8

I disagree with the above comments. I'm a Spanish native speaker and there is subtle difference between the two. When used naturally... Después tends to indicate adjacency between the actions, i.e. they ate and they went for a swim afterwards. Luego does not mandate adjacency, i.e. they ate and they went for a swim later. The difference is very ...


3

In this particular context yes, they are interchangeable. BUT not every sentence accepts "luego" where "después" is. The simplest example should be a question like: "Before or after?" Which would be "¿Antes o después?" Using "luego" there would be wrong.


5

Yes, they are pretty much interchangeable. However, as usual, there might be some regional differences. One I can think of is "después"/"luego" + de: In Spain, the construction "luego de" sounds a little bit odd. "Después de" sounds much better. In Latin America, I believe "luego de" sounds just as fine as "después de". I cannot tell in which countries ...


1

Yes is natural interchange 'luego' and 'después', is the same. And remember that is 'después' (é)



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