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3

My understanding of the terms is that recato means something that has much more to do with decencia than to 'modestia`. I use them more or les this way: Modestia is indeed modesty. I use to show the humility of somebody about skills or good deeds. It is not shyness and I consider it a good thing (not being eager to brag or show off), but of course other ...


1

En Chile no se hace la diferencia entre ambas palabras. En general se prefiere "castellano" a "español". La asignatura escolar se llamó "Castellano" desde la organización del sistema educacional en la década de 1940, hasta la reforma de 1990. En ese momento se acogió la distinción expresada en las otras respuestas a esta pregunta, vale decir, que el ...


0

"Castellano" or "Castilian Spanish" is also often used as synonim for "Spain's Spanish", to distinguish it from "Latin american Spanish", especially when dubbing movies. See an example here: Let It Go in 25 languages


2

The diference between "manejar" y "conducir" is subtle, and -in spite of Rodrigo's explanation- is totally blurred by de-facto usage, which varies wildly from region to region. By the way, I'd translate both as "to drive" more than "to steer". In Argentina, we understand but rarely use "conducir" for steering a vehicle. We'd prefer "manejar" for both: ...


2

Yes, that statement would sound funny in Spain, where indeed the speaker would have used conducir twice. Latin American countries favor "manejar" (to handle or steer a vehicle, if you fancy it that way) instead of "conducir" but that doesn't mean that they don't know (or use) the word conducir. In the same way, some these countries you would probably hear ...


6

Although they are expressions of the same sense (observing regional differences that have been mentioned), you must remember that these are words with different meanings. Manejar involves taking action to get something. Originally, these actions were manual (manos = "hands"), and the word relates to manipular ("manipulate") and maniobrar ("maneuver"). ...


8

That's quite a weird phrase for simply because I'm from Spain. Manejar is only used in Latin countries and meanwhile conducir is the only word we use in Spain. This phrase has to be written by a person from South America also because in Spain we don't use canal but carril. Of course you can use twice conducir or manejar, but it souns quite repetitive. ...


8

Spain usage: The word pecho can be considered an exact equivalent of the English breast; you can use it uncountably (the front part of your thorax) or countably (women have two of them). It is a neutral word and can be used safely in any context. To breastfeed also translates as dar el pecho. Seno can have several meanings. It can be your lap, a woman's ...


4

Indeed they do all refer to the same thing, but you are right, they do all have different connotations. Seno - Cleavage The space between the breasts; The space between the chest and a woman's shirt. Seno refers to this area, and you might possibly bring it up when a woman grabs her wallet from inside her shirt; or change, a cellphone, tampons, ...


1

In Spain is much more common to hear cremallera. You could use cierre and people would still understand you, provided that there is enough context Se me ha enganchado el cierre. Actually, the definition of creamallera is el cierre que se aplica a una abertura longitudinal cierre en prendas de vestir o bolsos. which implies that other pieces of ...


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Cierre is an easier, lazier way to refer to zipper. It literally means close; a conjugation of to close. Cremallera is actually a zipper, the mechanism use to join openings in fabrics.


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Antojarse is of the olvidarse/perderse group of reflexive verbs where the subject is at fault. The subject of the sentence is the desire. It is an overwhelming, enveloping, or even possibly a far-fetched way to express a desire. It is a desire that occurs, that affects, that comes over you. When it's cold, you often feel like putting on a jacket. When ...


1

En primer lugar, no queda claro si lo que estás queriendo es traducir del inglés al español o del español al inglés. En particular no pensaría que la traducción directa de "tener ganas de" es "feels like". En mi opinión, feels like se relaciona mucho más con lo sensorial mientras que "tener ganas de" está en otro plano que lo relaciono más con el querer. Por ...



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