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0

Just as there are countless correct responses in English: Coming On my way Be there soon Okay Be there in a jiffy ... there are also countless possible responses in Spanish: Voy Estoy llegando. Estoy en camino. Estoy en ruta. No tardaré. Okay. Bien. ...


-1

It seems more efficient and quick to say, Ya vengo. or Vengo ya.. for en route. Or even, Estoy viniendo


0

Traer means carrying something to the speaker's location. Llevar means carrying something from the speaker's location to somewhere else.


1

También es posible "Estoy de camino".


2

The common expression in Spain would is "Estoy llegando" Any of this also would work "Estoy a punto de llegar" "Casi he llegado" "Llego en 5 minutos" "Ahora llego" But the simplest one would be "Estoy llegando"


2

I've always been told that it's the passive voice. "Spanish is spoken (here)" Passive "We speak Spanish (here)" Active


0

My Spanish is fairly good, learned from my Spanish-born uncle. 'Claro' is used more in conversation, such as, when someone is telling you a story, the listener often peppers his responses with 'claro' and 'claro que si', in order to express the listener's affirmation and understanding of the story. But 'por su puesto' is used more in declaring something ...


0

I always think of the difference in the two as being .... is it with you? or is it on you? Traigo las llaves would translate to I bring the keys while Llevo las llaves would translate to I bring the keys with me, I have the keys on me, I'm carrying the keys, I'm wearing the keys That last translation says it all. If you bring something as in traer ...


1

Yet even another more formal way could be: Te pido disculpas. Te pido perdón.


1

Other alternative, stronger than just "lo siento": lo lamento / lo lamento mucho / lo lamento muchsísimo It's also more formal than "lo siento"


1

It's a peculiarity of the English language that you have 40 minutes for lunch, but 40 minutes to eat it. In Spanish we use for (para) always, that's all. 40 minutos para el almuerzo y 40 minutos para comerlo.


2

If you use de in the sentence above, wouldn't it change the meaning to: You have one minute of choice It doesn't make much scene, but consider this: Tienes un minuto de paz / You have one minute of peace Here para is used to denote purpose, destination or need, while de is used to indicate possession. I think this difference can also be clearly seen ...


1

In Mexico it applies the same as in other countries. "Sobaco" is vulgar and if you do use it, its when someone has bad odor in their armpits (te huele el sobaco, hueles a sobaco). Axila is when you are actually referring to the armpit as a body part.


2

Doctor's and Adriano's answers are correct, but not exactly right. "Se habla español" has no direct translation to English because the language differs from Spanish. "Spanish is spoken" translates literally to "El español es hablado", even though it's not a common phrase. In Spanish you can conjugate certain verbs without having a subject. For example, ...


1

"Sentir", "perdonar", "disculpar", and even "dispensar" are all used depending on the reason for your apology: "Lo sentimos, este teléfono ha sido desconectado." or "Lo sentimos, la lluvia ha arruinado el paseo." You're just being polite, it is not really your fault and beyond your control. "Discúlpame por haber llegado un poco tarde." or "Estamos ...


1

I will second Eric Andres's point in using "querer" with living creatures instead of "gustar." At least in much of Latin America, using "gustar" with humans usually insinuates a physical/sexual attraction. With animals, even though it's (generally) certain that you're not saying that you find the cat sexually attractive, it might sound slightly off. Best ...


2

"Se Habla Español" is the equivalent of "Spanish Is Spoken." (*edited to reflect roy.fourson's good explanation on the lack of direct translation) The fact that it is spoken here is inferred, and therefore it is not necessary to write "Aqui Se Habla Español." A brief note on usage: In the USA, "Se Habla Español" ("Spanish Is Spoken Here") is very ...


0

In the spanish of Peru, a walnut is known as a Nuez de Nogal and a pecan is known as a Pecana. Brazil nuts are Castanas (the n should have a cidilla) , peanuts which are originally from there are Mani or Manies. So your recipe would call for Nogales or Pecanas.


9

The translations would be Se habla Español <> Spanish spoken (here) Hablamos Español <> We speak Spanish But these phrases are all valid, and almost interchangeable. The overall meaning is never in doubt. People typing up these signs don't normally care about the precision. Finally, "It speaks Spanish" is not translatable as "Se habla Español", ...


2

Here are some correct choices: Al gato le gusto yo Yo le gusto al gato Le gusto al gato (you can ommit the article "Yo" because there's no other article that can be used in this specific sentence)


3

el gato me gusta I like the cat. me gusta el gato I like the cat. The translator is correct - both sentences mean the same thing. The correct way to say "The cat likes me" would be this way: Yo le gusto al gato Al gato yo le gusto Essentially, this would translate back into English as "I [am] liked by the cat" or "By the cat, I [am] ...


0

Le gusto al gato? I could be wrong though since Spanish isn’t my native language.


1

Your translation in your question is wrong. The worse has already passed That would be the translation if you used el, not lo. So why does it sound funny? Because El peor ... is incorrect Lo takes peor and soaks it in as an adjective. while El looks to peor as an indicator to another noun. El peor equipo de la NBA.


4

Whereas English has only one definite article, "the", Spanish has five definite articles: el used to define a masculine singular noun, e.g. el toro (the bull) la used to define a femine singular noun, e.g. la vaca (the cow) los used to define a masculine plural noun, e.g. los toros (the bulls) las used to define a feminine plural noun, e.g. las vacas (the ...


0

Depends in what country you would like the answer to, although there are many ways to speak Spanish, the correct format of a slang word such as "badass" will change. In some countries you might say "Genial!" or "Chevere" (That is more South American) but these words are not actually bad word (or words people might find offensive). Other Spanish speaking ...


0

If you mean it in its positive meaning I don't think there's any good translation for badass because all of them sounds totally lame (at least in Spain). There maybe are certain ways of translating it but it would depend extremely on the context and they would be localisms.


0

The more slanglike translation that I can think is "cabrón" or "hijo puta" for persons and "the puta madre" for objects or situations. Although "cabrón" and "hijo puta" can be used on a positive way between close friends (mainly on the north of Spain) they usually have a very negative connotation, so handle with care this expressions and the tone you use ...


3

According to RAE agujetas is correct, and it is a term I have heard several times the day after playing an intense football match, skiing,.. pl. Molestias dolorosas que pueden sentirse en los músculos algún tiempo después de realizar un esfuerzo no habitual y reiterado. Dolor muscular is self explanatory. The medical term would be mialgia, and in ...


10

Ok, I must confess, at first I thought the question wouldn't make sense, but it does and actually it's quite interesting. In Spanish adjectives, possessives pronouns, and so on are declined according to the noun they qualify. In this case, nuestra is qualifying madre, which is always feminine (unless..., no, always feminine). Let's compare with other ...


1

I think "rudo" or "cabrón" would be the best translation for someone who is badass. This word is not really easy to translate, in fact in Mexico we often say "este hombre es bien badass".


3

In Mexico we say "entumido" (numb) or "adolorido" (in pain). I'm not sure where in Mexico they say the former, but in Guadalajara we say the latter. For example, Estoy adolorido porque fui ayer al gimnasio.


2

In Mexico, agujetas is not so common, you must say: Estoy entumido.


3

There might be regional terms for that, but I've never heard anyone say "envaramiento" or "agujetas". A more regionally neutral way to say it would be Me duelen los músculos por haber nadado ayer



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