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3

Both ways are completely correct and can be used the same way to express what you meant in English. In other words: there are synonyms. Maybe you can understand it better with this translation into English: ...pero trabajo para otra empresa --> but I work for another company. However, be careful because you made a different mistake: As you can see above ...


7

Both can be correct. That said, en francés is much better, mainly because when using the adjective form, it could be interpretted either as a phrase either rendered in the French language (en la lengua francesa) or as a phrase with its origin in France (del país francés) which may or may not be rendered in the French language: la frase española: maybe ...


6

Color classification and labelling are subjects of endless debate, even between people that talk the same language, so when there is a translation, you can imagine the difficulties. My opinion is that it makes no sense to try and match all the color expressions from one language to the other, because that match will be different for every bilingual person ...


0

A way to refer to a Spanish speaker is "hispanohablante." There was a German saying that "Whoever speaks German is German." The term "hispanohablante" gets around the tricky issues of "descent" or "location."


2

As far as I know, you could have three ways: Azul: is the blue color. Azul marino or Azul ultramar: is a darker blue. Celeste: is a very light version of blue: light-blue or sky-blue. Calipso or Aguamarina: a light version of blue-green. From Wikipedia, you can analyse a broader list of colors: Lista de azules claros Azules medianos y oscuros By the ...


1

Given the great extension of territories where Spanish is spoken, there are for a single type of food, many ways to name it, according to the country (or region in a single one). There's also an opposite case: the same word refers, in two regions, to different varieties of the same food, or even to two different ones. For your specific question: Frijol: ...


1

In Spain, at least in my region, Andalucía, it's quite different. "Tallarines" is a type of pasta long and flat, but we referred that only in the asiatic case. In other cases, we used the italian word "tagliatelle". For "Fideos" we understand the kind of pasta you use in a soup. Usually they are tiny and short: ...


2

"Frijol" is not a common word in Spain, where we use mostly "judía" (also "haba" or "alubia" depending on zones). In this context, "habichuela" is the long, green pod (containing small beans) depicted at http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f6/Habas_frescas.jpg while "judía" (and its american synonym "frijol") is the single bean depicted at ...


5

Esto me imagino que sea distinto depende de la región, te explico en Cuba como se conocen. Los fideos son los que usamos para la sopa, son mucho más delgado que los espaguetis. Los tallarines son de forma aplastada Y los espaguetis Por lo menos así es en Cuba como se conocen.



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