Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Ok, I must confess, at first I thought the question wouldn't make sense, but it does and actually it's quite interesting. In Spanish adjectives, possessives pronouns, and so on are declined according to the noun they qualify. In this case, nuestra is qualifying madre, which is always feminine (unless..., no, always feminine). Let's compare with other ...


9

The translations would be Se habla Español <> Spanish spoken (here) Hablamos Español <> We speak Spanish But these phrases are all valid, and almost interchangeable. The overall meaning is never in doubt. People typing up these signs don't normally care about the precision. Finally, "It speaks Spanish" is not translatable as "Se habla Español", ...


4

Whereas English has only one definite article, "the", Spanish has five definite articles: el used to define a masculine singular noun, e.g. el toro (the bull) la used to define a femine singular noun, e.g. la vaca (the cow) los used to define a masculine plural noun, e.g. los toros (the bulls) las used to define a feminine plural noun, e.g. las vacas (the ...


3

According to RAE agujetas is correct, and it is a term I have heard several times the day after playing an intense football match, skiing,.. pl. Molestias dolorosas que pueden sentirse en los músculos algún tiempo después de realizar un esfuerzo no habitual y reiterado. Dolor muscular is self explanatory. The medical term would be mialgia, and in ...


3

el gato me gusta I like the cat. me gusta el gato I like the cat. The translator is correct - both sentences mean the same thing. The correct way to say "The cat likes me" would be this way: Yo le gusto al gato Al gato yo le gusto Essentially, this would translate back into English as "I [am] liked by the cat" or "By the cat, I [am] ...


2

Here are some correct choices: Al gato le gusto yo Yo le gusto al gato Le gusto al gato (you can ommit the article "Yo" because there's no other article that can be used in this specific sentence)


2

Doctor's and Adriano's answers are correct, but not exactly right. "Se habla español" has no direct translation to English because the language differs from Spanish. "Spanish is spoken" translates literally to "El español es hablado", even though it's not a common phrase. In Spanish you can conjugate certain verbs without having a subject. For example, ...


2

"Se Habla Español" is the equivalent of "Spanish Is Spoken." (*edited to reflect roy.fourson's good explanation on the lack of direct translation) The fact that it is spoken here is inferred, and therefore it is not necessary to write "Aqui Se Habla Español." A brief note on usage: In the USA, "Se Habla Español" ("Spanish Is Spoken Here") is very ...


2

If you use de in the sentence above, wouldn't it change the meaning to: You have one minute of choice It doesn't make much scene, but consider this: Tienes un minuto de paz / You have one minute of peace Here para is used to denote purpose, destination or need, while de is used to indicate possession. I think this difference can also be clearly seen ...


1

It's a peculiarity of the English language that you have 40 minutes for lunch, but 40 minutes to eat it. In Spanish we use for (para) always, that's all. 40 minutos para el almuerzo y 40 minutos para comerlo.


1

Se habla is a verb construction called "reflexive" verbs. It refers to what one does to "oneself." For instance, "vestirse" (in the infinitive) is to dress oneself. So "hablarse" (infinitive) or "se habla (conjugated) español" means, one speaks to each other in Spanish. A more idiomatic English translation is, "we speak Spanish. In Spanish, you could say ...


1

I will second Eric Andres's point in using "querer" with living creatures instead of "gustar." At least in much of Latin America, using "gustar" with humans usually insinuates a physical/sexual attraction. With animals, even though it's (generally) certain that you're not saying that you find the cat sexually attractive, it might sound slightly off. Best ...


1

Your translation in your question is wrong. The worse has already passed That would be the translation if you used el, not lo. So why does it sound funny? Because El peor ... is incorrect Lo takes peor and soaks it in as an adjective. while El looks to peor as an indicator to another noun. El peor equipo de la NBA.


1

"Sentir", "perdonar", "disculpar", and even "dispensar" are all used depending on the reason for your apology: "Lo sentimos, este teléfono ha sido desconectado." or "Lo sentimos, la lluvia ha arruinado el paseo." You're just being polite, it is not really your fault and beyond your control. "Discúlpame por haber llegado un poco tarde." or "Estamos ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible