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0

In Colombia use tobogán for a big slide specially if it is like a tube and has curves(wet or dry). And rodadero referring to a children's playground slide.


0

Voy means that I am going somewhere. Vengo means that I am coming here. I am going to New York in june (you are in Japan) Voy a Nueva York en junio (you are in Japan) I am coming to New York in june (you are in New York but planning to come back) Vengo a Nueva York en junio (you are in New York but planning to come back) Cheers!


1

There's (at least) one situation in which using "Entonces de pronto vengo en Enero" is correct: if you're physically with your cousin at the time. if you will be elsewhere before January if you will get back to the place you are with your cousin. In that case, "voy" is incorrect, because you'd be coming back. The equivalent in English would be "So, I ...


0

You couldn't use "Vengo en Enero" if you are referring to going to USA from Spain for example, while you are in Spain. You have to use "Voy", because "Vengo de" means coming from somewhere (while already here) and "Voy a" means going to somewhere (while being here).


1

La preposición utilizada It all depends upon the preposition used after the verb. Although they have different contexts as far as their definition, they still mean relatively the same thing. Although, using the wrong verb will sound a bit strange. Vengo de <== Coming from Vengo a <== Come to Vengo por <== Coming by ( as in Come by airplane ) ...


1

The simplest difference for these two terms is to consider them as this: Voy: is like going, from a current place to another place. Vengo: is like coming, from another place to a current place. So, "I'm going to your house" and "I'm coming from Canada", would be, "Voy a tu casa" and "Vengo de Canada".


6

As a rule of thumb: Vengo is coming from. Ir is going somewhere or going to do something (including leaving the current place). I would have used voy too in that context. I live in USA now and my family in Spain. A phone conversation would be like: My father: Hijo, vas a venir (aquí) a España por Navidades este año? Me: No. No voy este año. Esta ...


0

There, you're omitting the subject in your sentence (in this case, I "me" (first person)). Entonces de pronto yo vengo en enero. If you review the "conjugación del verbo (ir)" the most adequate conjugation of subject "I (yo)" for your sentence is: Entonces de pronto voy en enero.


1

These are different verbs: vengo is for venir voy is for ir vengo en enero sounds better to me like "I'm coming in january" while "I'm going in january" looks to be missing something.


1

En Chile a un llamado que no se puede rechazar le decimos citación.


1

Diría que no es una invitación, sino una convocatoria dentro de la empresa. La empresa lo puede llamar de esta manera debido a la naturaleza del evento (una cena o una fiesta), pero si es de asistencia obligatoria no es una invitación sino una convocatoria o solicitud para un acto de empresa. Invitación forzosa es en sí mismo casi un oxímoron, pero la RAE ...


0

"Buen Fin" is a short form of saying "Buen fin de semana". But for extra reference, most recently, "Buen Fin" reefers to Mexican Marketer's attempt to create a "Black Friday" equivalent in Mexico.


6

In my experience, “Buen fin” is a totally common phrase, meaning something like “Have a nice weekend”. The literal translation would be “Que tengas un buen fin de semana”, but few people say that because it's too long (but it may be appropiate in a formal context). Also note that “fin” itself is also used with the meaning of “weekend”, such as “¿Qué vas a ...


3

The proper abbreviation for Buen fin de semana in Spain is Buen finde The expression Buen Fin has other meanings there: Quiero llevar este proyecto a buen fin. But is not used to refer to the weekend, at least in Spain. It seems that in México El Buen Fin is used to designate an special event: El Buen Fin (Literally the "The Good End" but ...


1

The difference in the three phrases: 1.) The first is more direct. In English, the translation is of course, `I want to speak to you 2.) The second is a bit personal. It suggests that you have a discreet reason to be talking to this person. It is the equivalent of I want to speak with you 3.) The third is not right, nor will it ever be. Tú is a ...


1

"Hablar con tú" is incorrect. Both Quiero hablarte and Quiero hablar contigo are correct, but there is a difference, due to the use of "te". You could use Quiero hablar contigo as it is, but you won't hear just Quiero hablarte, you'll hear as Quiero hablarte de algo Since te is a pronominal particle that you are adding to a pronominal verb, and thus ...


0

"Quiero hablarte" is all good, it translates to I wanna speak to/with you. "Quiero hablar contigo" is exactly the same as above but maybe you can say it's in a more expanded way? "Quiero hablar con tú" it's plain wrong, "contigo" is the correct one in this scenario.


1

The first two options are correct: Quiero Hablarte Quiero Hablar contigo The third one is incorrect.


0

In Colombia, I use (and sometimes I heard) the following phrase: ¿Me repite su nombre por favor? (formal) Also can be added the words Disculpe/Disculpa and/or Perdone/Perdona at the beginning of the phrase.


-2

"Me estás haciendo dar hambre" is the correct way. if you say "Me das hambre" she'll probably understand you want to eat her.


0

Claro is pretty passive, but the word itself suggests something to be clear and concrete. Claro, to me, sounds like the equivalent of Yeah sure, Alright., Ok, Gotcha and so on. Por supuesto translates to something synonymous with this awful sentence ...It is supposed. ... or better said, Of course.. <- That phrase carries just as much respect with it ...


0

Claro can be exactly translated to clear, so its used to point out something supposed to be obvious. Por supuesto is more complex, it does the same job but by a different approach. The "supuesto" is something implicit in the content. Something that was indirectly pointed out, or, of what it consists or depends. How its "supposed". To translate it into ...


3

in early Spanish "haber" was used to mean "tener" That's right, and the evolution can be followed from the English analog: Yo he un caballo = I have a horse (old Spanish) Yo he un caballo comprado = I have a bought horse (here 'comprado/bought' is an adjetive) Yo he comprado un caballo = I have bought a horse (this was ...


2

Using haber to express possession could certainly be used back in the day (where it had the imperative forms habe and habed), but it developed today into the virtually exclusively auxiliary (for perfects) and impersonal (for existential statements) verb we have today. There are a few situations where you might use it in legal or other contexts where ...


1

You can use Quiero comprar una medicina in Spanish. Nothing necessarily wrong with that (so discard option 1). About option 2, you might be right, since you would say "I want to buy a book", and pluralize that with "I want to buy some books". Imagine that you could be using that sentence when getting to the counter of the pharmacy and asking the ...



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