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Claro is pretty passive, but the word itself suggests something to be clear and concrete. Claro, to me, sounds like the equivalent of Yeah sure, Alright., Ok, Gotcha and so on. Por supuesto translates to something synonymous with this awful sentence ...It is supposed. ... or better said, Of course.. <- That phrase carries just as much respect with it ...


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Claro can be exactly translated to clear, so its used to point out something supposed to be obvious. Por supuesto is more complex, it does the same job but by a different approach. The "supuesto" is something implicit in the content. Something that was indirectly pointed out, or, of what it consists or depends. How its "supposed". To translate it into ...


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in early Spanish "haber" was used to mean "tener" That's right, and the evolution can be followed from the English analog: Yo he un caballo = I have a horse (old Spanish) Yo he un caballo comprado = I have a bought horse (here 'comprado/bought' is an adjetive) Yo he comprado un caballo = I have bought a horse (this was ...


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Using haber to express possession could certainly be used back in the day (where it had the imperative forms habe and habed), but it developed today into the virtually exclusively auxiliary (for perfects) and impersonal (for existential statements) verb we have today. There are a few situations where you might use it in legal or other contexts where ...


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You can use Quiero comprar una medicina in Spanish. Nothing necessarily wrong with that (so discard option 1). About option 2, you might be right, since you would say "I want to buy a book", and pluralize that with "I want to buy some books". Imagine that you could be using that sentence when getting to the counter of the pharmacy and asking the ...


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In Argentina the most natural traslation is: "Comí dos porciones de torta.” The main translation of "slice" is "rebanada" or "rodaja", but that only applies for transversal cuts (bread). And when it's very thin (ham, bologna) we say "feta".


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Depends on the shape of the cake. Seriously! A "rodaja" is usually round in shape, like a wheel ("rodaja" is related to "rueda"). A "rebanada" is literally a "slice"; i.e., similar to a "rodaja", but not necessarily round, like a slice of bread. A "pedazo" or "trozo" (they're basically synonyms) can be of any shape. It's just a part of something. A ...


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This is one of those expressions that you should not try to translate from a language to another. You are not actually asking about the time, but about the hour. That What time is it? is sort of Which is the hour? when asked in Spanish, so you are identifying one of the 24 moments in which we have divided the day. We are not identifying a property of time, ...


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I'd go with "trozos" for a casual talk, or "porciones" for a formal situation.


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What I've heard is the verb "caer", but this may be local usage. Los partidos de fútbol caen los jueves.


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If you want that some events happen a certain day, you have to use the word "ser". The word "estar" is only used to declare a particular state or a process(time, position, condition, etc). However you can also use a second verb after "estar" that works as an adjective to be able to substitute the verb "estar". For example: Los partidos de fútbol sala ...


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En Andalucía, si tienes pinta de extranjero y pides una manzanilla, te responden "No tengo encendida la máquina de agua caliente". Yo siempre tengo que añadir: "...pero sin cucharilla ni azúcar" para que me entiendan. La ambigüedad, de hecho, es total. Salvo si estás en una carpa de la Feria, claro.


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Events took place on a determinate moment, but as far as you know that this is inmutable, you should use "Ser". You only can use "Estar" in certain cases when you know that the event is susceptible to change it's schedule. La reunión está programada para el viernes. La reunión es el viernes. Both phrases are equally valid, however, the first one ...


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I would go with ser: El jueves era el día que cenábamos pizza cuando yo era pequeño. Los jueves eran los días que cenábamos pizza. We use ser to refer when a event takes place. El domingo es el día de ir a misa.


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Some of the other answers provide solid practical information, but I'm going to get into some of the nitty gritty of it :) When you say La camisa es azul, you have three parts: subject, copula verb, and predicate adjective. Here's it and some others broken down: El librosuj. parecev.cop. interesantep.adj.. La sopasuj. estáv.cop. fríap.adj.. La camisasuj. ...



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