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2

Incendio forestal, o incendio en general es un fuego sin control. Chimenea u hogar, el lugar donde se hace fuego para calentarse en la casa. Fogón para cocinar. Fogata en el campamento. Hoguera para quemar o incinerar cosas o personas. En hogueras quemaban a las brujas y a los herejes en la Edad Media. Fuego, fósforos o encendedor para los cigarrillos. ...


3

In Spanish we have Fuego, Lumbre, Fogata y Hoguera, among others. Fogata is something that you can start in the forest, like a camp fire to roast marshmallows or burn weeds. Is not big. Hoguera is a big fire. Think of the bonfires of Saint John or burning a witch in a stake. A fire of that size is called Hoguera. Fuego is the most common and generic word ...


1

The Royal Academy of the Spanish Languaje changed the spelling of words in 1754 when published the new edition of "Ortografia de la lengua castellana", which pretty much defined modern spelling. One of the changes was that the /h/ sound would be spelled with j instead of x, while x would only represent the /x/ sound. Many words that had an X had to change ...


2

The diference between "manejar" y "conducir" is subtle, and -in spite of Rodrigo's explanation- is totally blurred by de-facto usage, which varies wildly from region to region. By the way, I'd translate both as "to drive" more than "to steer". In Argentina, we understand but rarely use "conducir" for steering a vehicle. We'd prefer "manejar" for both: ...


2

Yes, that statement would sound funny in Spain, where indeed the speaker would have used conducir twice. Latin American countries favor "manejar" (to handle or steer a vehicle, if you fancy it that way) instead of "conducir" but that doesn't mean that they don't know (or use) the word conducir. In the same way, some these countries you would probably hear ...


6

Although they are expressions of the same sense (observing regional differences that have been mentioned), you must remember that these are words with different meanings. Manejar involves taking action to get something. Originally, these actions were manual (manos = "hands"), and the word relates to manipular ("manipulate") and maniobrar ("maneuver"). ...


7

That's quite a weird phrase for simply because I'm from Spain. Manejar is only used in Latin countries and meanwhile conducir is the only word we use in Spain. This phrase has to be written by a person from South America also because in Spain we don't use canal but carril. Of course you can use twice conducir or manejar, but it souns quite repetitive. ...


0

What if they invented another saint called "Toño" (or you want to called that way a "Antonio"), "Tobaldo" or "Tontolín". You keep the same problem with the pronuntiation as in "Tomás" or "Toribio". As native speaker, I would say "Santo Tobaldo", "Santo Toño" y "Santo Tontolín" cause sound better, but "San Tontolín" is not bad either.


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I think it's because you use "ser" + participle when it's passive voice: The fire was put out by him. (El fuego fue apagado por él.) And you use "estar" in other cases: I'm very bored right now. (Ahora mismo estoy muy aburrido.) As I side note, we never say "es muerto". It's sounds unidiomatic and I don't even think it would make any sense ...


0

usually one use "estar" to describe a non-permanent characteristic or something subject to change its state. "ser" it is used to described something permanent or an inherent characteristic of something. But in this case, "estar muerto" you need to use the verb "estar" because "estar muerto comes from the participle form of the verb "morir = el ha muerto" so ...


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Estimo que la expresión capacitación se refiere a un proceso de adquisición o transmisión de conocimientos por un período relativamente corto para un aprendizaje, actualización, comprensión o conocimiento en algo concreto para ejercer el trabajo que realizas o vas a realizar. Formación, sea en América Latina y el Caribe como en Europa, se emplea para ...


1

In my honest opinion, it's better to attribute the idea of a "badass" as a quality that a person possesses (i.e. adjective) rather than a kind of person (noun). In this light, the most appropriate word would be machin (accent on the i). It's like "macho", but to the extreme! Also, since it happens to contain "chin" in it, it has almost the feel of the ...


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Soy español. En España "badass" referido a alguien se diría "cabronazo". No es lo mismo que "cabrón". "Cabrón" se dice en sentido peyorativo a alguien malo, perverso, despreciable. "Cabronazo" se dice en sentido positivo, a alguien travieso, bromista, burlón. También que tiene "mala baba" o "mala uva". Si bien la raíz es la misma, la terminación "azo" le ...


0

Se emplea "ser". Ejemplo: "La fiesta será el sábado" "El juego fue el viernes"


0

In Chile, a tobogán is big, probably you have to pay to use it, while a resbalín (also resfalín, refalín, rascapoto and raspapoto) is small, probably find it in a public place or in the backyard of a kindergarten.


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"Tobogán" is officially in the Spanish dictionary with that meaning. However, I am not sure if it is commonly used in Spanish-speaking languages. For example, in Puerto Rico (where I am from) we used the word "chorrera" which doesn't mean "slide" at all. But that is the word commonly accepted in that region. I know in Spain, Mexico, and a few other Latin ...



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