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28

Unfortunately I can't give you a definite answer yet. But I thought that not posting these two theories would've been a waste, so here they are: This point is in my opinion the most accredited: In this question, In Spanish, why do they say "buenos noches"?, the answerer says it comes from "Buenas noches nos dé Dios", which means "may God give us good ...


24

"De nada" means (literally) that there's nothing to be thankful about. "No hay nada que agradecer". It's semantically similar to "not at all", but it can also be correctly translated to "You're welcome".


16

Because Spanish is a language that evolved independently from English, which means translations do not have to follow the same rules. Buenos días is what you say between dawn and noon. The day is just starting, so it makes sense to wish the other person a good day, not just a good morning.


15

¿Bueno? Is used as a greeting when answering the phone (primarily in Mexico). ¡Buenas! As a short form of buenos/as (días|tardes|noches) is used as greeting in some regions of Spain and Latin America (Colombia, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Mexico).


15

In Spain is not usual to use "Welcome back!", at least I do not use it. In my experience, I have a friend who had gone to Scotland to live four months ago, last week he arrived to Spain and all of us said "¡Bienvenido!". If I translate "Welcome back!" I would say "¡Bienvenido de nuevo!" interpreting more than translating it, or "¡Bienvenido otra vez!". I ...


12

Es una interjección similar a "vale". Se usa para confirmar con el preguntado si está de acuerdo con lo propuesto. En este caso, usando "va" o "vale" provoca que tú confirmes si os véis después o no. "Va" también puede ser usado como respuesta en lugar de vale: -¿Vienes al cine? -¡Venga, va! Otro ejemplo con "te hace": Vamos a jugar a fútbol ...


11

In a somewhat formal context like that, the right expression would be Me alegro de volver a verle.


10

According to RAE "it's a polite answer to thanks being given to somebody", basically it's kind of equivalent to it was nothing/think nothing of it/no problem/don't mention it, in spanish you can also say no fue nada (and in that sense that sounds more "complete"), por nada, no hay problema, so basically de nada and the other variants are the current short ...


10

Complementing Alenanno's answer, I summarized this Wordreference thread : ¿Bueno?: Mexico ¿Sí?: Mexico, Spain ¿Aló?: Colombia, Chile, Peru, Costa Rica, Venezuela Hola: Argentina ¿Diga?: Spain, Argentina ¿Dígame?: Spain ¿Oigo?, ¿Dígame?: Cuba


9

I would say: ¡Bienvenido! or ¡Bienvenido de vuelta! "¡Bienvenido de regreso!" is fine too, I don't know why but I prefer to use "vuelta" instead of "regreso".


9

It's a Dominican slang way of saying "what's up" (or even WTF), most likely coming from "¿qué es lo que esta pasando?" (What's happening? or What's going on?), suppressing the s in a way like this: ¿Qué es lo que... (está pasando, pasa, etc)? > ¿Qué eh lo que...? > ¿Qué e lo que...? > ¿Qué'e lo que...? > ¿Qué lo que...?


9

Regardless of the time of the day, ¡Buenas! is understood as an abbreviated greeting. Couldn't elaborate more on the exact meaning of why it is used like this, but we have become used to it as a very generic and informal way of greeting. This is however a very informal greeting, so in any other situation Buenos días, Buenas tardes or Buenas noches should ...


8

"Don", "Señor" and "Caballero" come from nobility titles granted in the Middle Ages. They are widely accepted in some countries/regions, and frowned upon in others. From those three, "señor" is the safest bet, but as you already saw, it is not completely safe. The same with "joven" or "chico". Not always safe. I think your best choices are (as already ...


8

"Señor" adressed to someone young is perceived as calling someone old but it's not seen as an insult. You said he was a waiter so "camarero" would be more correct (whatever his age was) but generally we don't use any specific word, if you want to call's someones attention is usually with a "¿Oiga/Oye?" or "¿Perdone/na?" "¿Disculpa/pe?", if it's someone youg ...


8

Yeah it's the same in Spanish. You have to use "Buenos días" if you're in the morning,"Buenas Tardes" for the afternoon/evening and "Buenas noches" at night. It's difficult to say when you have to stop saying "Buenos días" and start saying "Buenas Tardes". Literally, the point would be at noon, but at least in Spain people say "Buenos días" before having ...


7

Sí, es correcta. Para expresiones como "how is it going", "how are you doing" o simplemente "how are you" de manera informal, se puede decir: ¿Cómo estás? ¿Qué tal estás? ¿Cómo va todo? ¿Qué tal? ¿Qué tal va todo? ¿Qué tal andas? ¿Cómo andas?


7

I'm mexican and when someone says to you "Feliz año" you usually respond: Gracias, igualmente.


7

Podría ser sustituido perfectamente por OK o por vale. Nos vemos despues, OK? Nos vemos despues, vale? Realmente no hace falta incluirlo en la oración, pero añade énfasis la pregunta, buscando la aprobación del otro. Es como si el que pregunta esperase un "sí" por respuesta al usar "va".


7

The best catch-all expression is ¡Felicidades! It applies to Christmas, New Year, Passover, Eid, birthdays, baptisms, bris, graduations, engagements, weddings, new jobs...


7

For Christmas one usually use Feliz Navidad [y próspero año nuevo] > Merry Christmas [and a happy new year] If you don't want to be Christmas specific you can say Felices Fiestas > Happy Holidays


7

Additional to Alfredo's answer I would like to add some context. You can answer as you can answer to any greeting. Be aware I am not a Mexican native speaker, although I have friends that come from Mexico. Bien, gracias. No mucho. Nada Super bien. Super mal. etc... Now, as a bonus I tease my friends taking the phrase literal. ...


7

American English is famous for responding to thanks with an acknowledgment that something indeed was done: "You're welcome" (yes, I did you a favor, and I accept your thanks). Virtually all other European language respond to thanks with a denial that anything significant was done: "de nada," "It was nothing," "de rien," "det var ingenting," etc. "You're ...


6

Possible responses are: Nada. Aquí nada más. Todo bien. Todo perfecto. Echándole ganas. Echándole. Aquí echándole (ganas). Nariz: Pretty casual and informal which means nada. You can add the "¿Y tú?" to the end of the sentence.


6

"Querida Carmen" is perfectly acceptable for non-love-related relations like the one you are describing. It's more like "Dear Carmen" than "My beloved Carmen". I would not use exclamation marks (EDITED from wrong "admiration marks") to emphasize the salutation. If you still use them, please use both the opening and the closing ones. (¡Querida Carmen!) ...


6

There are different ways to express the same salutation in spanish: ¡Qué bueno verte (de nuevo)! ¡Qué gusto verte (de nuevo)! ¡Me alegro de verte (de nuevo)! ¡Me alegro de (volver a) verte!


5

In English we say: No Problem It was nothing Don't mention it Don't worry about it All as very casual responses to "Thank you" In Spanish I would use "de nada" in the same environment. With friends / family, etc.. If I were entering a classy restaurant and held the door for someone who responded with "muchos Gracias" then I would reply ...


4

I found a page with some polite language on the phone in Spanish. The "¿Bueno?" you see at the beginning is maybe understood by any Spanish speaker, but it seems it's mostly used in Mexico. In other Latin American countries they say "¿Aló?". In Spain they use "¿Dígame?" or ¿Diga?".


4

As far as I know, it's because the person saying that is wishing the other person 'continued' well-being rather than 'singular', 'one-time' well being. Keep in mind a big part of Spanish is influenced by the slavery culture created in Latin America by the Spanish conquistadors. The serfs, the local Indians, were expected to be 'more than courteous' to their ...


4

In Spanish, you express your wishes for the remaining of the day. So, in the morning, you wish a good day. After noon (sometimes after lunch), you wish a good afternoon. Good night is said when the day is over.


4

There's a lot of sociolinguistic issues going on between tú vs Vd. If someone is younger than you, you can generally use tú, but the details are best left to one of the questions on here more directly suited to it, but when in doubt, use Vd.. Omiting the pronoun can always (and, preferentially) be done with tú. With Vd. it is better to include since you ...



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