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Usually both words are used as synonyms, but as you mention it depends on the religion. In Mexico where most people are Roman Catholics both words tend to be used interchangeably, however, non-Catholic Christians tend to make a distinction, using Rezar for "reciting" (usually like reading parts of the Bible or reciting a memorized prayer like the Padre ...


3

First, it's important to clarify that there are many different versions of the Reina-Valera Bible. The Wikipedia article explains that the first version was published in 1569, and there have been many versions since. However, when people talk about the RVR, they are generally referring to the 1960 version. Since 1960 there have been additional revisions (the ...


2

Holy means sagrado and santo in the sense of sacred: Holy Land : Tierra santa Holy Spirit : Espíritu santo Holy Bible : la santa biblia (common) or la sagrada biblia (uncommon) Holy Family : la sagrada familia (as in Gaudí's masterpiece) Holy Grial : el santo grial It's also translated as bendito(a): Holy water : agua bendita ...


2

I consider “orar” and “rezar” as synonims. In Spain, “rezar” is much more usual when speaking; “orar” sounds more formal and even solemn. It turns out that the DRAE introduces a distinction between both terms, defining “orar” as “hacer oración a Dios” and “rezar” as “dirigir oraciones a Dios o a personas santas”. I am amazed of hearing about this major ...


1

In this context, I would translate to plant as instaurar. to plant a church: instaurar una iglesia church planter: el instaurador de la iglesia church planting: la instauración de iglesias But I suspect anglicisms like plantamiento and plantador will prevail.


1

I have not been able to find anything of the sort in online dictionaries but I did a quick google search and I did find several articles in Spanish that talked about expanding the protestant church and they all did mention the word "plantar" which would be the literal translation of "to plant". As an example here is one of the sentences: También destacó ...


1

I would say, that at least in Spain, the only one of them used in Religion is "salvado", as a participle of the verb "salvar". If you look up the definition in RAE of "salvar" you'd see this: tr. Dicho de Dios: Dar la gloria y bienaventuranza eterna. which I think it's the exact definition you're looking for. While for salvo the closest meaning ...


1

I think they are almost equivalent. I have the subtle feeling that "rezar" involves a bit more the notion of a being (call it God, a saint, etc) taking part in a spiritual discussion, for example, there is one popular saying "rézale a tu santo", that means: "pray to your saint". In the other hand I have the feeling that "orar" is a bit more general, you can ...


1

Even though this is an old post i love chatting about the Spanish Bible I agree with your analysis that alot of Spanish Bibles are translated using old Spanish vernacular or just the modern Castilian Spanish of Spain. Bible Translation has to be approched different than just normal translations because you have to take into account the copies of the ...



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