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8

En esta página, del señor Justo Fernández López dedicada a los verbos pronominales, he encontrado una descripción que me parece apropiada, así que la transcribo aquí: comer – comerse La forma no pronominal comer significa "ingerir alimento", "deglutir un alimento sólido", "tomar la comida". La forma pronominal comerse significa: "omitir ...


6

Para mi A. Mi hermano menor (sujeto) rompió (verbo) la mayoría de vasos (objetivo) B. La mayoría de vasos (sujeto) se rompieron (verbo reflexivo, acción sobre el sujeto) (en inglés:A. My small brother broke the most of the glasses. = normal sentence, subject performs action of the verb on the object or B. Most of the glasses broke (maybe when I ...


6

The "me" in "no te me hagas el bobo" is a solidarity pronoun. It's used to create a stronger link between the speaker and the audience. This is a topic that has been studied in sociolinguistics (google "solidarity pronoun"), and some languages such as Galician and Basque (as far as I know) have special constructs to express it. Basically, "no te hagas el ...


5

The two pronouns just combine in one: "One takes a shower frequently in hot weather" --> Se ducha frecuentemente cuando hace calor. She takes a shower frequently in hot weather --> (Ella) se ducha frecuentemente cuando hace calor.


5

Yes, It has an additional meaning. De, a, hacia, desde, etc are prepositions, and they are used to fine tune the verb they are with. De usually points to the passive recipient of the action (I don't know the actual term). For example: Escaparse de la policia - To escape from the cops In this case you're doing the escaping, but the cops are being the ...


4

W...wait. Olvidar works like forget in English. The one doing the forgetting is the subject and the forgotten thing is the object. Yo olvidé mi cita. Yo olvidé mis llaves So the verb must match in form the one doing the forgetting. However, you are also seeing examples of passive construction with "se". Se me olvidó la cita. Se me olvidaron las ...


4

According to RAE in this link: discutir. ‘Contraponer opiniones sobre algo’. Puede ser transitivo: «Discutieron la conveniencia de comprar algunos libros de ocultismo» o intransitivo, caso en el que lleva un complemento con sobre, de o acerca de: «Discutieron de platos y de precios» ; «Un grupo de diplomáticos hipócritas discutían sobre la paz» ...


4

This is a kind of passive called "Pasiva refleja". "Pasiva refleja" is the passive voice most used in Spanish. RAE explains it here. The way of forming it Se + < transitive verb > + < nominal element > The verb will be always conjugated in 3rd person. If the nominal element is singular it will be 3rd person singular, but if that nominal element ...


4

You seem cute. (Depends on context. It could also be used to imply someone thinks they're cute.) The object pronoun is reflexive and is used to establish the passive voice. verse and parecer can be used interchangeably most of the time in this context (to seem). You look bad. Here, se is used to establish the passive voice, and the te in te ve is a direct ...


4

La segunda frase sólo sería correcta si los vasos fueran parte de "mi hermano" por su carácter reflexivo como muy bien explica BrianA. Así que un ejemplo de uso con el "se" sería "Mi hermano menor se rompió la mayoría de huesos".


4

It is necessary to show the correct use of 'celebra' in a passive voice: With se: (se celebra = es celebrado/celebrada) -> (it) is celebrated Se celebra principalmente en Mexico y Estados Unidos. It is celebrated mainly in Mexico and USA. Without 'se', 'celebra' turns into active voice = (he/she/it celebrates) A deeper explanation can be ...


4

Both olvidar and olvidarse are correct. I think the best examples are in the DPD. From the DPD: olvidar(se). ‘Dejar de tener en la memoria algo o a alguien’, ‘dejar de tener afecto a alguien o algo’ y ‘no tener en cuenta algo o a alguien’. En el español general culto este verbo admite distintas construcciones: Como transitivo, con ...


3

In Spain we say "aféitate", but in places where voseo is used they say "afeitate" (stress in the second "a", but I'm not sure if it has graphical accent without written accent).


3

The word "se" is used whenever you want to point that something is part of, property of, like when you use "for himself/herself" or "his/her". So putting this as examples: Mi hermano menor se rompió la mayoría de vasos. means "my little brother broke the mayority of his glasses" (but since the bother doesn't have glasses inside his body nor the glasses ...


3

Yes, and it's the rule you wrote yourself, adding se to the infinitive. As all infinitives end in -ar, -er or -ir, adding se is totally regular and consistent. At least grammatically, because there may be some verbs that are semantically unable to become reflexive, I.E. it wouldn't make any sense that the subject and the object be the same, although I'm ...


2

Although the example in the question are impersonal se and not reflexive se, they do follow many of the same rules. The meanings are completely different, but look at these examples: Spanish is spoken. Se habla español. Spanish speaks itself. Se habla español. (Español se habla.) The word order could go either way. Cars are sold. Se ...


2

se is not reflexive in neither example you gave, it's only reflexive when it can be translated to him-/her-/itself For example: se miró al espejo : he looked himself on the mirror edit: This isn't a golden rule, there are exceptions, like se ató los zapatos (he tied his shoelaces) which doesn't involve himself, but because although semantically the shoes ...


2

serme = ser + me and means "to be" in its infinitive reflexive form. "Mentirme" is of the same form, mentir + me. This year I decided to be faithful to myself and not lie to myself. You can add the reflexive pronouns to the end of infinitives, gerunds and affirmative imperative verbs.


2

You find yourself pretty. This is for ego talking. If I say "Me veo bien", that means I'm happy with my body, with my level of English... You look bad. This is an opinion on how are you, but is used for a general statement, something that everyone can notice. I can see you're ok! This is the same as 2, but with the subject giving an opinion. An example: ...


2

Some grammarians call pronominal verbs (verbos pronominales) those verbs that use a reflexive pronoun but do not have a reflexive meaning. The reflexive pronoun can appear in five basic cases: True reflexive verbs or reflexive actions: Pedro se llamó a la casa desde el celular. — Pedro rang himself home from his mobile. Reciprocal actions: ...


1

Asi pues es incorrecto, decir "me voy a comer" sin decir que comes,pues no hay objeto directo determinado, lo correcto es: "VOY A COMER" Se entiende la intecion pues nadie se come a si mismo, pero no por eso deja de ser incorrecto.


1

Se celebra translates to They celebrate which is how we, English speakers, would say it. For instance, Aquí se celebra Navidad en Pascua Here, they celebrate Christmas on Easter Not they as in 3rd person plural, but rather, they as in the people here. When we are giving instructions we tend to say things like You mix the milk in with the eggs Se ...


1

Al parecer estás buscando una diferencia semántica del tipo cognitivo. Como ya mencionaste, en numerosas ocasiones los individuos usamos e interpretamos la diferencia como una cualidad que cae en la "responsabilidad moral" que una persona asume sobre la acción o el evento narrado; ya que la palabra "se", es normalmente utilizada para hacer una construcción ...


1

Yes, it's reflexive. The verb llevarse (algo) means to take (something). All reflexive verbs end in -se. If you don't recognize a verb as reflexive at first glance, you might ask yourself if it makes sense as a reflexive verb. Llover (to rain), for instance, wouldn't make sense in the reflexive form. However, some verbs change their meaning when being ...


1

I'd like to point out that Olvidé la cita without context leads to confusion: Olvidé la cita: ¿Cuál cita? La cita bíblica. Whereas Me olvidé DE la cita makes obvious that one is referring to an appointment. Perhaps one trick is to ask yourself a question and see how would you answer it. For example: ¿DE qué te olvidaste? (Without the De the question ...


1

I don't understand it either. You use "se" mostly when the subject performs actions on itself or if you want to make an impersonal statement like "It's said" --> "Se dice".


1

I think that the "solidarity dative" is perhaps known better as the "ethic[al] dative," about which you can find a lot with a Google search. It was very common in Greek and Latin, and is still used in modern languages, such as, obviously, Spanish. Although we do not think of it as something we use in English, the Wikipedia article on the dative gives a good ...


1

When we speak about emphasizing I think that it is a bit subjective but I will do my best. From my point of view: Comió tres platos. / Se comió tres platos. (Transitiva) The first one is simply plain: you inform that someone ate three dishes. The second one emphasizes that someone was able to eat thre dishes, thus trying to remark that he/she could ...



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