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42

Both signs encapsulate statements that make an exclamation or a question or both. In the usage of both it is very important to have the following considerations: They have to be used at the beginning and the end of the statement. It is mandatory in spanish to use them. It will not be ignored as in the spelling of other languages that use only the ending ...


11

Spanish suggests the open question mark but modern Spanish doesn't enforce its use. Anyway, be careful where it goes. Using your examples, you could say: Hola, ¿cómo estás? And also Eso es maravilloso, ¿verdad? You don't use the open question mark at the beginning because the entire sentence is not a question, actually Hola (within a greeting) is ...


9

The Spanish names for the hyphen, en-dash and em-dash are guión, semiraya o raya menor, and raya, respectively. In Spanish, the en-dash is not widely used although, due to English influence, its use has become rather common nowadays. The raya (em-dash) usually indicates separation; for example, it signals interventions of different characters in a dialogue ...


8

En efecto, no se debe hacer uso de la coma para separar elementos gramaticales cuando media alguna de las conjunciones y, e, ni, o, u, salvo en los siguientes casos (el siguiente texto es tomado de la Ortografía de la Lengua Española): Se coloca una coma delante de la conjunción cuando la secuencia que encabeza expresa un contenido (consecutivo, de tiempo, ...


8

Con el riesgo de estar equivocado pues no he logrado encontrar una regla o explicación que diga lo contrario. La idea de reemplazar la "y" por "e" cuando la siguiente palabra comienza con "i" es para no tener dos sonidos iguales uno después del otro y que no se produzca una interrupción. En francés hay reglas similares en donde se sustituye la última ...


7

That dot/period . means the dialogue start, now days is more common the use of - dash desfiguraban, dio una gran voz, diciendo: //narration . ¡Jesús! ¿Qué es lo que veo? //dialogue Y con el sobresalto se le cayó la vela de las manos; y, //narration How I know is used now days is: desfiguraban, dio una gran voz, diciendo: //narration ...


7

Use of "¿" in Spanish serves a specific purpose, which is to indicate the beginning of a question which otherwise would be ambiguous as to whether it were a question or a statement: Q: ¿Existen estudios sobre este tema? A: Existen estudios sobre este tema. You see, the exact same sequence of words can be used for the question and the answer. The ...


7

Here's a summary of what the RAE says about the different types of quotation marks in Spanish (see comillas): The most usual types of quotation marks in Spanish are angular quotation marks (« »), double quotation marks (“ ”) and single quotation marks (‘ ’). Double and single quotation marks are written in the upper part of the line, and the angular ...


6

This answer provides a possible answer to this question as well: You can start with one sign (¡) and close with the other (?) if the meaning is mixed, but using both is preferred. ¡Que ha dicho qué? !¿Que ha dicho qué?! And according to Wikipedia, you can also use this form, although it is not considered standard: ⸘Que ha dicho qué‽


6

They are proper examples in Spanish. They are usually two adjectives that describe a very specific quality of the object (in most cases). For example: Franco-alemán Lógico-matemático Físico-químico Histórico-artístico Cirujano-anestesista anti-Mussolini These words are not foreign, as said they describe something specific. There are some rules as to ...


5

I don't think the inverted question and exclamation marks are in danger of extinction for the following reasons, among others: On chats, tweets and the like, often we start typing before we decide it's a question or at least before we know where the question starts. We know it by the end of the sentence when we finish, but can't be bothered to go back and ...


5

Las frases que has escrito son correctas en cuanto a los signos de puntuación (te sobra el pronombre "lo" en la primera, y en cuanto a la segunda, la traducción sería "¿¡Hablas en serio!?" o "¡¿Lo dices en serio?!"). También puede iniciarse con un signo y terminar con el otro: ¿Él dijo qué! o ¡Él dijo qué? Estos dos ejemplos son estrictamente ...


5

Officially (according to the Real Academia Española), both must be used in almost all cases. The Diccionario Panhispánico de Dudas includes a section on question marks and exclamation points, which says: Son signos dobles, pues existe un signo de apertura y otro de cierre, que deben colocarse de forma obligatoria al comienzo y al final del enunciado ...


4

The "Libro de Estilo de El País" is a classic.


4

Both the ¿? and ¡! signs encapsulate statements that make an exclamation or a question or both. Both signs have the same rules. In the usage of both it is very important to have the following considerations: They have to be used at the beginning and the end of the statement. It is mandatory in spanish to use them. It will not be ignored as in the spelling ...


4

While my source is not as authoritative as the DPD, this blog explains a case that is not covered by Chewis's answer. Sometimes the term uses comma, sometimes not. With comma when confronting a positive element to a negative one, or in no sólo …, sino también clauses. No quise decir eso, sino todo lo contrario. No solo toca la guitarra, sino ...


4

You are right in your suspicion. Compound sentences using adversative conjunctions need a comma between the simple sentences, as explained in the article for coma from the Diccionario Panhispánico de Dudas: 1.2.8. Se escribe coma delante de las conjunciones o locuciones conjuntivas que unen las oraciones incluidas en una oración compuesta, en los casos ...


4

I might be wrong (I'm only a beginner myself) but I think it is a typo and there should be a space instead. My attempt at translation would be: In my career I have set goals for myself that I have always achieved and now I enjoy an extraordinary professional success. Gozo seems to be a form of gozar.


4

There are certain rules as the usage of the comma. All is mentioned in the RAE. Now the relevant rules that are mentioned in the rae are the following. You use the comma after a y, e, ni, o, u, this is used with copulative and disyuntive conjunctions: A comma must be written before the conjunction when the sequence links the previous predicate. And not ...


3

I cannot answer your question for sure because I cannot read the future, but I think your evidence is quite strong unfortunately. The reason for what you observed is obviously that many of the people writing to you may be using an English keyboard and it is oh-so-tiring to type a special symbol. It happens to me when answering questions in Spanish here. I ...


3

Those are simply refer to as adiciones (additions); the DPD recommends (under corchete) the use of square brackets to perform such additions: c) En la transcripción de un texto, se emplean para marcar cualquier interpolación o modificación en el texto original, como aclaraciones, adiciones, enmiendas o el desarrollo de abreviaturas: Hay otros [templos] ...


3

This is the RAE article in the Diccionario panhispánico de dudas. There are plenty of examples and all the rules to use the hyphen. Hope it helps.


3

Let's take these two sentences as in before 1754: Estás herido y necesitas ayuda. Estás herido y necesitas ayuda? We can't know if it's a question or affirmative sentence until we read the question mark or full stop at the end. In long sentences it would be quite confusing to understand the meaning of them as in Spanish there are no auxiliary ...


2

Esta es una pregunta muy común cuando alguien ve preguntas o exclamaciones en español por primera vez. Esa es simplemente la forma como se escribe, asi es la regla, se debe de poner el signo de puntuación al principio y al final tanto en preguntas como en exclamaciones. Entonces si deseas crear un efecto de confusión o sorpresa al escribir y escribes ambos ...


2

According to the RAE (Real Academia Española), the period has to be placed outside the quotation mark. See the reference about the usage of punto (dot): Combinación con otros signos 3.1. El punto se escribirá siempre detrás de las comillas, los paréntesis y las rayas de cierre: Dijo: «Tú y yo hemos terminado». Tras estas palabras se marchó, ...


2

Not in the spanish grammar I know. Maybe is an old spanish feature. At present, day, modern spanish do not use period inside a sentence, we use only to finish a sentence. You won't find this type of writing in any modern text.


1

Exceptionally well typeset materials will use anen-dash to signal a brief break in dialog which is introduced with an m-dash. I don't see it in a lot of publishers, but it works really well. —Yo me llamo... –murmuró el niño– Emilio Sánchez Pérez. In either case, whereas in English style will vary as to whether you put a space or not on both sides of the ...


1

You can also use fundéu. It's very usefull because this site highlights the "trending topics" in the news.


1

It was introduced in the Grammar in 1754 but was not generally used until years later. You can start with one sign (¡) and close with the other (?) if the meaning is mixed, but using both is preferred. ¡Que ha dicho qué? !¿Que ha dicho qué?!



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