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1

While it is true that the "y" and "ll" are pronounced as a palatalized English J, in practice the difference is small enough to make it irrelevant. For example, when I was a kid I used to live abroad and essentially grew up not speaking Spanish, so I tend to pronounce it as an English J. Pretty much the only relevant difference is how these letters are ...


1

My recommendation is to go ahead and practice speaking con distinciĆ³n (that is, distinguishing s from z/c). It's not going to be as important to others understanding you. There are only a handful of real possibilities for confusion when you speak with seseo (I would not recommend to anyone learning with ceceo), and it's not like Spaniards don't ever talk ...


4

We can not recommend you which one if you do not know the exact location. Should I learn the northern, southern or central British accent if I go to England? I guess the same can be applied to your country, Peloponnesian, Cretan, Northern ... Depending on the zone you can check out this answer. But if it were for me I will choose the "standard" Spanish, ...


-4

Learn to speak with s. It is essential in Spain, specially in Andalusia


0

It can depend on who is doing the singing, and on regional accents, too. In Argentina, the "y" sound is very close to the English "j". If a Mexican is singing an Argentine tango, sometimes he will drift in and out of imitating the Argentine accent. The same thing happened during the "British invasion". Some Brit pop singers who spoke with their own ...


0

This can happen in normal speech too. For many speakers of Spanish, the y will be pronounced as something better described as halfway between the English y and j. That's a rather inexact position, and you try to do it you'll notice sometimes it comes out as more of a y or more of a j. Depending on phonetic context, stress, intonation, etc, the Spanish y ...



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