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13

C is never silent. 'c' has three sounds. When combined with 'h' it creates the digraph 'ch' with the same sound as english 'chair' ('choza'). When followed by 'a', 'o' or 'u' or by another consonant it has the 'k' sound ('casa', 'cobre', 'ósculo', 'actor'). When followed by 'e' or 'i' it has the 'z' sound ('cereza', 'ciruela'). Your problem arises with ...


8

Technically, it's different : the "s" in piscina forms part of the previous syllable (pis-ci-na). In practice, the difference in pronounciation is practically null in regions with seseo (most Latin America), where then "s" is pronounced the same as the "c": in these regions piscina sounds practically the same as pisina, especially in informal conversation. ...


6

For Spanish is difficult to see the difference between words like sheet - shit , sheep - ship, leave - live, this - these, it - eat. Short i vs long e sounds equals most of the times, when I pronounce it I have to think about it and even that I still ask to myself If I am right, but I do not give up, it is something you have to deal when you learn a new ...


6

Es una pregunta muy interesante, aunque parece ser que no existe una respuesta clara al respecto... Te aconsejo leer este completo artículo en Wikipedia, que trata exclusivamente sobre este tema, donde se explican las diversas teorías que exiten actualmente sobre las causas de este fenómeno. Según este artículo, unsa de las teorías más ampliamente ...


5

No soy estudioso del idioma, y el artículo citado de Wikipedia es bastante informativo. Pero, la sola experiencia de leer poesía española antigua (no mucho, siglo XVI) me ha mostrado que no fue solamente "un cambio solo de grafía", sino que la antigua "h" (escrita como "f") no era muda (que el sonido fuera el mismo que la "f" actual es otro asunto). Por ...


4

All spoken languages have both vowels and consonants. Vowels and consonant are simply the two broadest classifications of vocal sounds. A vowel is defined as a sound in spoken language, pronounced with an open vocal tract so that there is no build-up of air pressure at any point above the glottis And a consonant as a speech sound that is ...


3

Everyone has an accent or dialect, and some even have a speech impediment like a lisp. There is no perfect way to pronounce a language. As long as you can put together the right syllables in the right order (with the right intonation), you can be understood. It would be no different if you were an American traveling to small-town Ireland or Scotland or ...


2

This is a tricky question. If someone doesn't know another language, he/she can't know how to pronounce it well. That's obvious. However, in the case of Boca Juniors, I would say many people in Argentina learn how to say it way before knowing how it is written or how to write at all. Anyway, in the more general case, I'm no expert but I think people just ...


2

Yes, it is true. I think it also depends on who you are addressing and how much confident you are with each other, since those name-modifications are usually used between friends, relatives or someone you are familiar with. For changing these names using some rules, you can refer to the "sufijos diminutivos" diminutive suffixes(e.g. Carlitos) in this link ...


2

Debido a la expansión después de la reconquista (1492) hacia el sur por parte de Castilla, mientras que la Corona de Aragon lo hacia al mar Mediterráneo (conquista del Reino de Napoles en 1504) recuerdo el papel de los Andaluces en Sudamerica. Como se comenta en otra respuesta el seseo es un rasgo y presente en la comunidad Andaluza y Canaria. Hay una ...


2

This is related to areadjustment of the sibilant consonants that took place during the XVIth and XVIIth century, giving the origin of the consonantal current system of the Spanish language. The [s] advanced his point of joint towards the interdental fricative deaf sound (/θ/). Some dialects didn't change this sound (Andalucía, Canarias, America). So Or ...


2

For c + vowel you can memorize the standard rules: 1. ca, co, cu = ka, ko, ku 2. ce, ci = ze, zi where z is pronounced like 'th' in 'think' Now, depending on the zone you are, 'seseo' changes all cases of rule 2. into 2. ce, ci = se, si


1

Puedes encontrar una buena explicación sobre la silabación en este enlace. En particular, sobre tu pregunta, esa página dice lo siguiente: El ataque complejo está formado por un grupo de /obstruyente/ + /líquida/, la única combinación consonántica permitida en posición prenuclear en español. La frontera silábica se situará ante ambas consonantes ...


1

I've always thought that the language evolved differently in each country, depending on the languages spoken in Latin America before Spanish. Taken from this link El español llevado a América por los conquistadores evolucionó de distinto modo según las regiones y las zones de influencia de las lenguas indígenas. Todo dependió también del nivel de ...


1

D does take longer than the other sounds, which makes it more difficult to speak fast. People either: 1) Slow down for the "d" sounds. Used when speaking properly is more important than speed, like politicians. 2) Practice speaking fast so that their mouths can move faster and faster each time, like entertainers or radio djs. 3) Make a partial "d" sound ...



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