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17

C is never silent. 'c' has three sounds. When combined with 'h' it creates the digraph 'ch' with the same sound as english 'chair' ('choza'). When followed by 'a', 'o' or 'u' or by another consonant it has the 'k' sound ('casa', 'cobre', 'ósculo', 'actor'). When followed by 'e' or 'i' it has the 'z' sound ('cereza', 'ciruela'). Your problem arises with ...


13

In theory, it's different: the "s" in piscina is part of the previous syllable (pis-ci-na). In practice, the difference in pronounciation is almost null in regions with seseo (most Latin America), where "s" is pronounced the same as "c". In these regions piscina sounds very similar to pisina, especially in informal conversation. Other examples: ascenso, ...


7

Es fácil si ya sabes escribir la palabra que quieres decir. Hay tres reglas fáciles (síguelas en orden) Si hay tilde, acentúa la sílaba que lo alberga. Si acaba en A, E, I, O, U, N o S, acentúa la penúltima sílaba. Acentúa la última sílaba. Así que, en palabras como carmesí, espíritu, llevándosemelo, el tilde te indica dónde poner el acento. En palabras ...


6

For Spanish is difficult to see the difference between words like sheet - shit , sheep - ship, leave - live, this - these, it - eat. Short i vs long e sounds equals most of the times, when I pronounce it I have to think about it and even that I still ask to myself If I am right, but I do not give up, it is something you have to deal when you learn a new ...


6

Es una pregunta muy interesante, aunque parece ser que no existe una respuesta clara al respecto... Te aconsejo leer este completo artículo en Wikipedia, que trata exclusivamente sobre este tema, donde se explican las diversas teorías que exiten actualmente sobre las causas de este fenómeno. Según este artículo, unsa de las teorías más ampliamente ...


5

No soy estudioso del idioma, y el artículo citado de Wikipedia es bastante informativo. Pero, la sola experiencia de leer poesía española antigua (no mucho, siglo XVI) me ha mostrado que no fue solamente "un cambio solo de grafía", sino que la antigua "h" (escrita como "f") no era muda (que el sonido fuera el mismo que la "f" actual es otro asunto). Por ...


5

Depends where the d is located. In front of the word or after a consonant: It is pronounced like you how pronounce it in English. Example: day = día, agenda = emprenda. After a vowel It is pronounced like "th" as in "the". Example: edulcorante, educación. At the end of the word It is pronounced like "th" as in "the". But in many dialects it is ...


4

This is related to readjustment of the sibilant consonants that took place during the XVIth and XVIIth century, giving the origin of the consonantal current system of the Spanish language. The [s] advanced his point of joint towards the interdental fricative deaf sound (/θ/). Some dialects didn't change this sound (Andalucía, Canarias, America). So Or ...


4

According to this link, Valparaiso was named after the birth place(Valparaiso, Spain) of the man who founded it, who actually was Juan de Saavedra. You are correct in your assumption about the name: Valparaiso = paradise valley. Val comes from "valle"(valley) and paraiso is the Spanish for paradise. You can verify this information by visiting the ...


4

La fundéu (asesorada por la RAE) da una explicación de cómo hacerlo: El grupo consonántico -tl- plantea problemas, porque se pronuncia de forma diferente en >distintas zonas hispanohablantes. Dice al respecto el Diccionario panhispánico de dudas: c) La secuencia de consonantes tl tiende a pronunciarse en sílabas distintas en la mayor parte de la ...


4

This is a good question, and unfortunately the answer is, "it depends". The Spanish letter d has different pronunciations depending on where it comes in a word. Word-initially, it will generally have a sound closer to the English d, although pronounced with the tongue behind the teeth, rather than upon the upper alveolar ridge (on the hard palate). ...


4

When a C or G is followed by either an I or E, then the pronunciation changes. Ga - gah Ge - heh Gi - hee Go - goh Gu - goo and.. c Ca - Kah Ce - Say Ci - See Co - Koh Cu - Koo This can present a problem when a new Spanish learner is trying to spell.. If you are looking to create the sounds Gay and Ghee, ...


4

All spoken languages have both vowels and consonants. Vowels and consonant are simply the two broadest classifications of vocal sounds. A vowel is defined as a sound in spoken language, pronounced with an open vocal tract so that there is no build-up of air pressure at any point above the glottis And a consonant as a speech sound that is ...


4

We can not recommend you which one if you do not know the exact location. Should I learn the northern, southern or central British accent if I go to England? I guess the same can be applied to your country, Peloponnesian, Cretan, Northern ... Depending on the zone you can check out this answer. But if it were for me I will choose the "standard" Spanish, ...


3

When C is followed by A, O or U, the C is pronounced as [k], similar to English k in key [ki]. Example: casa [ˈkasa] (velar) or quiero [ˈkjeɾo] (palatal) When C is followed by E or I, the C is pronounced as [θ], similar to English th in think [θɪŋk]. Example: cebolla [θeˈβoʎa] When G is followed by A, O or U, the G is pronounced as [ɣ]. In the beginning of ...


3

Debido a la expansión después de la reconquista (1492) hacia el sur por parte de Castilla, mientras que la Corona de Aragon lo hacia al mar Mediterráneo (conquista del Reino de Napoles en 1504) recuerdo el papel de los Andaluces en Sudamerica. Como se comenta en otra respuesta el seseo es un rasgo y presente en la comunidad Andaluza y Canaria. Hay una ...


3

Everyone has an accent or dialect, and some even have a speech impediment like a lisp. There is no perfect way to pronounce a language. As long as you can put together the right syllables in the right order (with the right intonation), you can be understood. It would be no different if you were an American traveling to small-town Ireland or Scotland or ...


2

There is a lot of difference. On 'piscina' you have three well differentiated syllables, that of 'pis', 'ci' and 'na', thus having differentiated terminal -s and starting z- sounds. It is of very poor quality speakers to forget the terminal -s in front of the immediate starting z- and pronounce 'picina' or 'pisina'. It sounds horrible.


2

It's all about practice. You would bite your tongue a lot if you were just now learning to chew your food. It just takes practice. In the meantime, you can try closing your teeth more so your tongue can't fit in there, putting your tongue behind your teeth. That way you can't bite it.


2

I would add something to @Envite answer (I can't comment): In spanish the sound it's more important than the way of writing (always respecting the orthografy). This means that if a word changes you have to update the way you write it. Also, the 'z' before 'i' and 'e' it's almost forbbiden, it turns into 'c', except for very few words for ethimological ...


2

Puedes encontrar una buena explicación sobre la silabación en este enlace. En particular, sobre tu pregunta, esa página dice lo siguiente: El ataque complejo está formado por un grupo de /obstruyente/ + /líquida/, la única combinación consonántica permitida en posición prenuclear en español. La frontera silábica se situará ante ambas consonantes ...


2

Pronunciation rules in Spanish are very consistent. Letter “C” has three different sounds, depending which letter comes next. Before E and I, it sounds SSS, like in Celsius, Civil Before H, sounds like Chalk, Challenge. Before anything else, like K. Likewise, letter “G” has consistent rules: Before E and I, sounds like Him, Her. Before anything ...


2

Try Duolingo (web/Android/iOS). I'm learning French with it and I find it quite useful.


2

The original spanish pronounciation of ll is a palatalized l (full tongue against the palate). This sound diverged through time and different areas. In México you mean hear it as the y in yellow or like j in jello, whereas in most of Argentina and Uruguay you will hear it as sh in show. Don't worry much about the pronunciation. In general, spanish words are ...


2

I am from Mexico City (DF) and I do not see any differences in pronunciation between "ll" and "y". For instance, I do pronounce the same way amarillo and Saltillo The same goes for ella, Troya, olla, paella


2

I think the basical thing is that, when you have your tongue up to pronounce "r" you have to make it vibrate, and to pronounce the "l" you don't (you better push your tongue against your palate) .


2

There are a few reasons why words get accents: The word does not follow natural stress. The problem you'll find with this rule is that you either need to know a word's pronunciation to know how to accent it, or how the word's written to pronounce it. It's a bit of a catch 22. But basically, when a word has irregular stress, it's accented. The regular or ...


2

Vowels: a e i o u Consonants: b c d f g h j k l m n ñ p q r s t v w x y z


2

For c + vowel you can memorize the standard rules: 1. ca, co, cu = ka, ko, ku 2. ce, ci = ze, zi where z is pronounced like 'th' in 'think' Now, depending on the zone you are, 'seseo' changes all cases of rule 2. into 2. ce, ci = se, si


1

Here's everything presented in a table (/χ/ may be realized as /x/ or /h/ depending on dialect). ╭─────╥───────┬───────┬───────┬───────┬───────╮ │ ║ A │ E │ I │ O │ U │ ╞═════╬═══════╪═══════╪═══════╪═══════╪═══════╡ │ J ║ χa | χe | χi | χo | χu | │ G ║ ga | χe | χi | go | gu | │ GU ║ gwa | ge ...



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