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This is a good question, and unfortunately the answer is, "it depends". The Spanish letter d has different pronunciations depending on where it comes in a word. Word-initially, it will generally have a sound closer to the English d, although pronounced with the tongue behind the teeth, rather than upon the upper alveolar ridge (on the hard palate). ...


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While it is true that the "y" and "ll" are pronounced as a palatalized English J, in practice the difference is small enough to make it irrelevant. For example, when I was a kid I used to live abroad and essentially grew up not speaking Spanish, so I tend to pronounce it as an English J. Pretty much the only relevant difference is how these letters are ...


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Here's everything presented in a table (/χ/ may be realized as /x/ or /h/ depending on dialect). ╭─────╥───────┬───────┬───────┬───────┬───────╮ │ ║ A │ E │ I │ O │ U │ ╞═════╬═══════╪═══════╪═══════╪═══════╪═══════╡ │ J ║ χa | χe | χi | χo | χu | │ G ║ ga | χe | χi | go | gu | │ GU ║ gwa | ge ...


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Actually, we Spanish speakers are not aware that 'd' has different sounds. There might be different sounds (I'd say it depends on regions) but to me (Argentine) our 'd' is similar to English 'd', only that a little softer. You can pronounce that way always and it won't never sound wrong. We never stick the tongue between-out of the teeth (as in "this"). We ...



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