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29

It’s a basic rule of Spanish phonotactics. In a nutshell, the structure of a Spanish syllable does not allow it: (C1 (C2)) (S1) V (S2) (C3 (C4)) A Spanish syllable consists of an optional onset, consisting of one or two consonants; a required nucleus, consisting of a vowel optionally preceded by and/or followed by a semivowel; and an optional coda, ...


21

This is a very common defect. This is one of the last sounds the children learn. In fact, I was unable to pronounce it correctly until I had some corrective training. Usually, it's not considered a speech impediment, but it will make the speaker sound dorky. It's worth noting than some regions (for example, many provinces in Argentina) do not pronounce ...


21

In Ancient Castillian, words like "caja", "bajo", and "jaraba" were originally spelled with an "x", and pronounced as "sh" (voiceless palato-alveolar sibilant). In the mid- to late-1700s the spellings were changed from an "x" to a "j", including words like "Mejico" and "Tejas". During that time, the "j" was actually pronounced as a "j" in English. Over ...


18

Cuando se trata de siglos, los números romanos del I al X se leen indistintamente como ordinales o como cardinales y se da preferencia, en el lenguaje culto, al uso del ordinal, pero del siglo XI en adelante solo se utiliza en la lectura el cardinal. Así, por ejemplo: Siglo I: "siglo primero" o "siglo uno". Siglo II: "siglo segundo" o "siglo dos". Siglo ...


17

C is never silent. 'c' has three sounds. When combined with 'h' it creates the digraph 'ch' with the same sound as english 'chair' ('choza'). When followed by 'a', 'o' or 'u' or by another consonant it has the 'k' sound ('casa', 'cobre', 'ósculo', 'actor'). When followed by 'e' or 'i' it has the 'z' sound ('cereza', 'ciruela'). Your problem arises with ...


16

See the Wikipedia article on yeísmo, which includes maps of the pronunciations. To summarize: in some regions, ll /ʎ/ and y /ʝ/ are distinct in other regions, ll and y have merged to /ʝ/ ("yeísmo") in very few areas, ll and y have merged to /ʎ/ ("lleísmo") Note that some specific dialects, like Rioplatense, pronounce their merged /ʝ/ as [ʒ] or [ʃ].


15

Generally there is no difference in the pronunciation, sometimes it could be a difference in the stress, the pronoun would never be used as a "weak form" or contracted. "No iremos porque (e)l niño no quiere ir" The bracketed "e" could be elided. "No iremos porque él no quiere ir" The final "e" in porque and the inital "e" in él would be both pronounced.


14

Como ha aclarado JolSauron, en el centro y norte de España no hay ceceo, sino el dialecto castellano puro y duro, que pronuncia /s/ o /θ/ según esté en el español escrito la "s" o la "z" (o la "c" cuando tiene sonido "z" en "ce" y"ci"), y que en España se ha considerado mucho tiempo, y de hecho se considera, el español "culto", "correcto" u "ortodoxo". El ...


13

In theory, it's different: the "s" in piscina is part of the previous syllable (pis-ci-na). In practice, the difference in pronounciation is almost null in regions with seseo (most Latin America), where "s" is pronounced the same as "c". In these regions piscina sounds very similar to pisina, especially in informal conversation. Other examples: ascenso, ...


9

Dialects There are three different terms used to describe this dialectal difference: ceceo, seseo, and distinción. Dialects that are said to have the ceceo use "th" instead of an "s" sound. Dialects with the seseo use the "s" sound. The distinción actually uses both, distinguishing between one and the other. Example For example, the words "casa" ...


9

The "strong R" (as in Rat) is spelled as just one r when in the middle of a word follows an L, M, N or S. As it's said in the comments, maybe M should not be considered because I can't think on any word with "mr". Examples: Alrededor, Conrado, desratizar... la letra R


9

Esto es lo que dice el DPD sobre la pronunciación de las siglas: 2. Tipos de siglas según su lectura a) Hay siglas que se leen tal como se escriben, las cuales reciben también el nombre de acrónimos (→ acrónimo): ONU, OTAN, láser, ovni. Muchas de estas siglas acaban incorporándose como sustantivos al léxico común. Cuando una sigla está ...


8

The second pronunciation you mention is almost exclusively used in the Argentina / Uruguay region. Any other country in Latin America uses the first pronunciation.


8

When 2 vowels appear in a row in he same word they belong to different syllables (there's an hiatus on them). So you would pronounce a longer sound but you have to take into account that you should make the stress in the stressed syllable of the word. For example "Le" vs "Lee" Le: one syllable Lee: 2 syllables (le-e) In this case "Le" has ...


8

No, tal como dice la RAE: f. Séptima letra del abecedario latino internacional y octava del español, que representa, ante las vocales e, i, un fonema consonántico fricativo, velar y sordo, y en los demás casos un fonema consonántico velar y sonoro. Su nombre es ge. ORTOGR. Para representar el fonema velar y sonoro ante e, i, se escribe una u ...


8

Es fácil si ya sabes escribir la palabra que quieres decir. Hay tres reglas fáciles (síguelas en orden) Si hay tilde, acentúa la sílaba que lo alberga. Si acaba en A, E, I, O, U, N o S, acentúa la penúltima sílaba. Acentúa la última sílaba. Así que, en palabras como carmesí, espíritu, llevándosemelo, el tilde te indica dónde poner el acento. En palabras ...


7

Por lo que yo tengo entendido, los extranjerismos, específicamente los anglicismos que es de lo que estamos hablando, son palabras de lenguas extranjeras llevadas al ámbito de uso del idioma local, es decir, que el idioma se ha apropiado del término llevándolo a su terreno. Esto se traduce en, muchas veces, un cambio en la escritura de la palabra, y en la ...


7

They are usually pronounced as if the "p" didn't exist. It's because these words comes from Greek. Here RAE explains it. For words starting with Ps- El grupo consonántico ps, resultado de la transcripción de la letra griega psi, aparece en posición inicial de palabra en numerosas voces cultas formadas sobre raíces o palabras griegas que comienzan ...


6

The RAE's Diccionario Panhispánico de Dudas explains the pronunciation of ll is: The voiced palatal fricative /ʝ/ (e.g. English yeast, close to English j) in the majority of Spanish speaking regions. This pronunciation is identical to the recommended pronunciation for y and this merger is called yeísmo. The palatal lateral approximant /ʎ/ (e.g. Portuguese ...


6

Wikilengua has this: Atlas Oral It's a website where people from all the word can upload their own recordings of short sentences indicating the accent they have. The site has different maps of countries or regions and over it you can see the recordings uploaded with the accent or the origin of the speaker. For example for Argentina is this one. So far, ...


6

Spanish words can't begin with sibilant blends, so when such a word is made or borrowed, an "e" is usually prepended to mesh with the pattern of Spanish pronunciation. It's not just "sp." Some English cognates, either with common Latin origins or borrowed anglicisms: esbelto (svelte) escasez (scarcity) esfera (sphere) eslogan (slogan) esmog (smog) esnob ...


6

When it comes to songs, everything and anything is valid in Spanish. Just listen to 5 minutes of reggeatton (or however you spell it) and you'll see how every possible grammar and pronunciation rule is broken. Singers usually do this sort of thing to force a rhyme, for example.


6

I wouldn't say you have a problem, if your goal is to communicate in Spanish, you'll be fine. If what you want is have the best pronunciation possible, then yes, learning to roll you rr, and even pronouncing the regular r may be important. I guess you should get a native speaker or someone who can already do it and tutor you and try many times to imitate ...


6

Es una pregunta muy interesante, aunque parece ser que no existe una respuesta clara al respecto... Te aconsejo leer este completo artículo en Wikipedia, que trata exclusivamente sobre este tema, donde se explican las diversas teorías que exiten actualmente sobre las causas de este fenómeno. Según este artículo, unsa de las teorías más ampliamente ...


6

For Spanish is difficult to see the difference between words like sheet - shit , sheep - ship, leave - live, this - these, it - eat. Short i vs long e sounds equals most of the times, when I pronounce it I have to think about it and even that I still ask to myself If I am right, but I do not give up, it is something you have to deal when you learn a new ...


5

I only found Dialectoteca del Español (on the popup window click on "Factores geográficos"). It has some videos of native speakers from different regions. But I think it's missing some dialects (for instance, there are no speakers from Argentina there). Edit Look for the "Audio clips" section on this blog post, there are recording from various Spanish ...


5

Yes, in Spanish there is generally no way to abbreviate the years. The only time it is used is referring to the years in the XX century. Example: Do you remember that concert back in eighty-nine? Recuerdas ese concierto en el ochenta y nueve? Other than in that case, the full year is pronounced. Even for this century's years. Do you remember ...


5

Se dice «siglo quince» siempre, como si fuera un numero arabe «siglo 15». No sigue el patrón de ingles con numeración ordinal, "fifteenth century." Igualmente se dice «siglo veinte» y «siglo ventiuno». Nunca he escuchado los otros.


5

You are right. This phenomenon goes all the way back to Vulgar Latin and applies to other Romance languages, as well. First of all, a little phonetics background: the vowels /e/ and /i/ are what phoneticians call front vowels, because they are articulated in the frontal part of the mouth, unlike, for example, /a/, /o/ and /u/, which are articulated more to ...



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