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10

"El bar" is the business, the place from the door to the toilets. "La barra" is the desk where the waiter works. The first one is a copy from the english "bar" with the meaning of "pub". The second one is the translation of the english "bar" with the meaning of, well, a bar inside a pub.


8

En el Manual de la Nueva Gramática de la Lengua Española, apartado 16.4.3a. Última frase. Se consideran también incorrectas las construcciones, propias de la lengua descuidada, en las que el mismo pronombre aparece a la vez como enclítico y como proclítico: *se debe respetarse cualquier opinión; *se lo tengo que decírselo Google Books, Manual de la ...


6

The Nobel prize Camilo José Cela once said: "No es lo mismo estar dormido que estar durmiendo, como no es lo mismo estar jodido que estar jodiendo.". The anecdote surrounding this funny quote illustrates well how the usage of gerund ("dormido", "jodido") and past participle ("durmiendo", "dormido") don't always carry the same meaning. Apparently Cela, as ...


4

In Spanish, a verb with "se" can be used as a more natural form of passive, called "pasiva refleja" (reflexed passive?). That is the case here "véase" is a form of "verse", that is the "pasiva refleja" equivalent to "ser visto". According to the conjugation, it is the third person, singular of the present tense of subjuntive. As you probably know the ...


4

You were right on the first one Is it "esta" instead of "este" because "taza" is feminine But eso is not the femenine of esa, but ese is. Eso is a pronoun not an article, you can't use it to describe the place of a something,eso is "the" something. Ex: -Échale eso a la carne. (Put that on the meat.) And for ese could be something like : -Échale ese ...


4

It is necessary to show the correct use of 'celebra' in a passive voice: With se: (se celebra = es celebrado/celebrada) -> (it) is celebrated Se celebra principalmente en Mexico y Estados Unidos. It is celebrated mainly in Mexico and USA. Without 'se', 'celebra' turns into active voice = (he/she/it celebrates) A deeper explanation can be ...


4

Según la definición de WordReference: Sí Forma tónica del pronombre personal reflexivo de tercera persona, que en la oración desempeña la función de complemento con preposición.   ♦ Al unirse con la preposición con, forma la voz consigo. En esta página web (en inglés) puedes encontrar información y ejemplos sobre los pronombres ...


3

A summarized table from the RAE website shows what to use in each case: RAE: pronombres personales átonos As you see les is incorrect when it is a reference to people in third person. You can see some examples on WikiLengua: A Jorge le vieron en el aeropuerto. [Uso leísta permitido] A Jorge LO vieron en el aeropuerto. [Uso CORRECTO] A María ...


3

I'm native speaker. There is a problem here. "Puedo verle" is formal and natural way of speaking, at least in peninsular Spanish (note: I'm from Madrid). "Puedo verlo" is hardly ever used. Here in Spain we don't use it very often, even in very formal situations, in second person or third person. The same for "puedo verlos", which means EXACTLY the same as ...


3

Este and Esta are used, when referring to nearby object, depending on the gender of that object. Quien bebe de esta taza? can never be "esto" because taza is feminine (la taza). Now, when you say "These birds are not black" you are referring to birds that are near. But in your example you have to translate: Esos pajaros no son negros. which ...


2

Yes. Indeed. Something hidden, could be anything. It is a cliche phrase, itself. Nobody knows where it comes from, and we use it not very often because it is a quite old expresion, but it is commonly used in books and it's a nice way to express the difficulty of doing something.


2

Es correcto que el sujeto de la oración subordinada es «esa sonrisa fría». El pronombre «se» tiene una función reflexiva (aunque podría pensarse también como una voz media1.): Esa sonrisa fría se cierra. En este caso la sonrisa también es el objeto directo (qué es lo que es cerrado) y el «le» es por lo tanto el complemento indirecto (a quién o para ...


2

Some grammarians call pronominal verbs (verbos pronominales) those verbs that use a reflexive pronoun but do not have a reflexive meaning. The reflexive pronoun can appear in five basic cases: True reflexive verbs or reflexive actions: Pedro se llamó a la casa desde el celular. — Pedro rang himself home from his mobile. Reciprocal actions: ...


2

My best guess is that el bar refers to the actual building, the establishment, while la barra refers to the actual bar, the big wooden table the customers hover over while they drink and order more drinks.


2

I assume the sentence is "Observo al hombre echado en el suelo", right? For starters, "observo" is really "Yo observo" so it's actually first person (which translates to "I observe") Notice it's in present tense. "Yo observé" is the correct translation of "I observed" Now, "echado" is a common word, and a synonym of "acostado", or "tirado".. both of which ...


2

I would say "Juan se lo dio a Martín". Juan lo dio a Martín sounds strange.


2

Yes, Juan se lo dio a Martin is correct. Juan lo dio a Martin is correct too, but that misses the point of using the double object construction.


2

It's not a matter of identifying direct or indirect objects. It's a matter of the right choice of the preposition. "Te voy a presentar a mi novia" means "I am going to introduce my girlfriend to you" If you want to invert the person that is being introduced, you use either con or ante (as Emilo Gort stated in his answer, the latter could sound ...


1

OK, in Spanish if you say that sentence, there is not way people can be completely sure about the action. In both case, both of them will be meeting each other, so really is not that important, but... if you want to make things more clear, then Spanish is a very open language. I would prefer to use something like this: (...to introduce my girlfriend to you) ...


1

Te is the Direct/Indirect Object Pronouns Te => you http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/iodopro.htm Update You're right, the problem here is at least I use that phrase Te voy a presentar a mi novia. indistinctly for both cases. It depend of the context. I note English is more precise than Spanish. If you want to be more precise to get I am going to ...


1

Indeed sí is the third person (singular and plural) reflexive pronoun, when used after a preposition. Yo lo hice para mí (mismo). I did it for myself. Tú lo hiciste para ti (mismo). You did it for yourself. El lo hizo para sí (mismo). He did it for himself. Ella lo hizo para sí (misma). Shi did it for herself. Nosotros lo hicimos para ...


1

Yes, it is used in both singular and plural. I lack explicit references, though. I'll cite the DPD, Leísmo, section 4g... Otro caso de leísmo generalizado en todo el mundo hispánico es el llamado «leísmo de cortesía». Se trata del uso de le(s) en función de complemento directo cuando el referente es un interlocutor al que se trata de usted. [...] ... ...


1

Estar echado and echar mean different things, first meaning is state and the second one is an action which means i.e. to throw, to toss, etc. It's impossible to confound them. Estar echado and echarse can be confounded because the first one is a logical consequence of second one, so Yo me echo (action) leads to yo estoy echado (final state of that action). ...


1

There are two differences going on here. One is the difference between a present participle, "lying", and a past participle, "echado". You've noticed this. The other is a subtle difference between the relationship between the man and the verb. A person takes the action of lying down. The action of "echarse" (note the reflexive form) is an action, yes, ...


1

What you have here is the imperative of the (pronomial)reflexive form of ver -> verse. According to spanishdict.com, it's a form used (among other occassions) in texts : http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/ver


1

Se celebra translates to They celebrate which is how we, English speakers, would say it. For instance, Aquí se celebra Navidad en Pascua Here, they celebrate Christmas on Easter Not they as in 3rd person plural, but rather, they as in the people here. When we are giving instructions we tend to say things like You mix the milk in with the eggs Se ...


1

Se veo los ojos Is something so incorrect grammar-wise, that you would never say it. Using SE they way you have is incorrect. You have used it as an indirect complement and not only that, you have used as a substitute for le/les in a time when you need not substitute. It would be more grammatically correct to say Le veo los ojos translating to ...


1

I noticed my mothers family in El Salvador uses Vos excessively. My Salvadoran family here in the States uses vos and tu equally. I think tu might be a bit more formal. Whenever they're joking about they tend to use vos more. My Mexican family doesn't use vos at all. I once traveled from El Salvador to Mexico (I picked up the Salvadoran accent and dialect) ...


1

Yes, it's reflexive. The verb llevarse (algo) means to take (something). All reflexive verbs end in -se. If you don't recognize a verb as reflexive at first glance, you might ask yourself if it makes sense as a reflexive verb. Llover (to rain), for instance, wouldn't make sense in the reflexive form. However, some verbs change their meaning when being ...



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