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10

Puede ser para ofrecer cercanía con el publico al que se dirige. La forma usted es mucho mas formal y desde luego implica respeto, pero eso no quiere decir que la forma tú carezca de él. Creo que en este caso hay mucho contexto en el canal. Puedo decirte, como nativo hispanohablante, que usted puede tener connotaciones negativas. Cuando yo tenía alrededor ...


8

los is an article. The right pronoun in this case is ellos. Otherwise it is a perfectly correct sentence, with a couple corrections: Muchas gracias por tus excelentes libros y videos. He aprendido mucho de ellos.


7

That's wrong. It should say "Él tiene más libros que yo". You can use "mi" as pronombre posesivo, as your first example, but to use it as a pronombre personal it needs the accent. "Mi amigo se alegra por mí". First one is posesivo (my friend / el amigo mio). The second stands for the person who is talking (me / yo). or Cuando digo mi ...


7

The lo is correct and necessary. It's a stand-in for the thing that is pleasing to you. Without it, que doesn't get parsed as what we in English think of as what, rather as that and the entire clause becomes the subject, rather than just the thing that pleases you. In other words, without the lo, your sentences starts of saying That it is least pleasing ...


7

When you use "usted" to address someone (here implicitly), you need to use the third person singular so the proper pronoun is "su". Por favor, (dame) tu maleta. (informal) Por favor, (deme) su maleta. (formal, honorific) See usted and its usage


7

It means "You forgot to love me" Grammatically, it isn't impersonal, rather reflexive (the subject is querer). olvidar is the transitive (takes a direct object) word for to forget, and olvidarse (de) is the equivalent intransitive. By the mere conjugation we don't know which, but by context we can tell that it is olvidar in middle voice (often called the ...


7

La could work, if what you're doing is something feminine (like la tarea). Lo is used when what you're doing is masculine (like el trabajo). If what you're doing has no gender because it's a verb or can't be reduced to some noun (like ir de compras) you use the other lo. It's neuter, even though it looks identical. In this case, the neuter lo is the ...


6

"Dónde" y "A dónde" van acentuados cuando son adverbios interrogativos o exclamativos (de lugar). Dónde habré dejado las llaves? / Me pregunto dónde habré dejado las llaves. Adónde irá con tanta prisa? / Me pregunto adónde irá con tanta prisa. No llevan el acento cuando son adverbios relativos que introducen frases subordinadas Las llaves ...


6

En efecto, el uso de usted es más formal, pero no necesariamente más profesional. En América, algunas regiones al menos, desde la segunda mitad del siglo XX si no es que desde antes, el uso de deícticos sociales para marcar respeto o cortesía, concretamente la forma usted ha ido en retroceso en su uso. Anteriormente era habitual que los hijos se dirigieran ...


6

Duolinguo is right: the correct way to translate it is soy su marido. le is a personal pronoun, whereas su is an possessive adjective. Since you want to show the "possession", you have to use su. Note that if we weren't using the pronoun, we would say: Le doy las flores -> Doy las flores a ella and Soy su marido -> Soy marido de ella meaning ...


5

Vosotros is used in the majority of Spain, Equitorial Guinea, and Western Sahara and for ser would take the conjugation you note. The latter two have substantially smaller populations than Spain or any other Spanish-speaking country so they are often ignored in discussions on linguistic issues in Spanish (not to mention that in many if not most cases their ...


5

This link about the usage of pronouns lo(s), la(s), le(s) might be useful. Basically, lo and la are pronouns used to refer to the direct complement in a sentence, while le is used to refer to a indirect complement. Lets see the parts of the sentence in your example. Its clear that "el maestro" is the subject and "lee" is the verb. Then you could say that ...


5

It is not necessary. Añadiremos aceite al motor cuando lo necesite. has the same meaning of (Nosotros) (le) añadiremos aceite al motor cuando lo necesite. Añadir is transitive. Aceite is the direct objet and motor stands for the indirect. Le is a pronoun referring to el motor. According to the RAE rules for pronouns we use "le" as a pronoun ...


5

Tu means two things in Spanish: you, of yours or simply your. In other words tu is both, a personal pronoun (in the form of Tú) as well as the possessive pronoun (in the form of Tu). The sentence "Ella es tu unica hermana" can only be translated as: She is your only sister. If you would like to say "She is his only sister" you would need to say: ...


4

Actually the pronouns make important distinctions in the example you provided and are not redundant: Quieres comer. Means, "You want to eat" Quieres comerlo. Means "You want to eat it", with "it" being that thing that has previously been named and the pronoun "lo" stands for. Quieres comer? Hay un yogur en la nevera Do you want to eat? ...


3

"El maestro los lee" would mean that the teacher reads THEM. "El maestro les lee" means the teacher reads TO them.


3

El pronombre dónde no sólo se acentúa cuando es interrogativo. Hay otro caso especial que se da cuando es pronombre relativo. La siguiente es una cita de la sección de consultas lingüísticas de la RAE. Es un poco extensa pero bien aclaratoria: Aunque los relativos, presenten o no antecedente expreso, son normalmente átonos y se escriben sin tilde, hay ...


3

As a native speaker of English, my take on this is that, especially in advertising, the company wants to make a connection with the intended audience, and therefore will use either the formal or the informal to connect with either a older vs. younger, more hip/modern vs. traditional, or formal vs. familiar crowd. In the case of the post above, the intention ...


3

Sí, se puede terminar una oración con un pronombre. Esta te suena mal, porque el pronombre (que no artículo) los está en acusativo, y cuando se usa preposición, el pronombre de 3ª persona plural que debe usarse es ellos. Les y los se usan siempre sin preposición, y cuando van tras el verbo se escriben junto a él. Sin embargo, ese tipo de construcción, ...


3

Se cannot be used for a true passive, hence it's often called the fake passive for SSL students, because it's actually in active voice. To take your sentences The book is being read by me. active Yo leo el libro. passive El libro es leído por mi. “se passive” Se lee el libro (*por mí) “se passive” passive El libro es leído por sí mismo. Notice the ...


3

Because he is the direct object. And the masculine direct object is lo. Although, you could still get away with saying No le conozco, it would mean more like I don't know him know him.' or He isn't known to me. As in, I don't know how he is as a person... ,I haven't gotten to know him. Whereas, no lo conozco is straightforward don't know who he ...


3

Primero, hay que recordar que se solo tiene interpretación indirecto si le sigue un pronombre átono directo. No puede representar los niños, porque si se fuese reflexivo con referencia a ellos, el verbo tendría que acordarse con los niños, pero está en singular. Creo que necesitaría algo más de contexto para estar seguro pero... Para mí, les llevó a los ...


2

As @toni mentioned the use of le/les or se depends on the type of the Object Pronouns (direct vs. indirect pronombres): DO Pronouns: me, te, lo/la, nos, os, los/las IO Pronounce: me, te, le, nos, os, les When both are used in the same sentence, like here: Ella te los dan.She gives them to you.IO: teDO: los Él me lo dice. He tells it to me.IO: ...


2

The indirect object pronouns le & les change to se when proceding the direct object pronouns lo, la, los & las. I give it to him- Se lo doy. (can't be Le lo doy) She tells her mom the truth--She tells it to her. Se la dice. Se is also used "impersonally" when it means "one" in general. One can buy milk here= Se puede comprar leche aquí.


2

Mi is an adjetivo posesivo (like tu, su, nuestro, etc.) Mí, notice the diacritic, is a pronombre personal preposicional. For example: Esta carta es para mí. This letter has been sent to me. However, yo is also a pronombre personal, but it is a pronombre personal no preposicional. For example: Creo que yo puedo hacerlo. I think I can do it. Your ...


2

I don't really know where you have seen someone use 'mi' as a noun, but, as a native Spanish speaker, I can say that they're wrong using it that way. 'Mi' is the possessive pronoun. To expand on what Diego Alonso said, 'mí' is a personal pronoun. As a general tip, translate it to English and see if it makes sense. He has more books than *my*. It makes as ...


2

You can (you use the pronoun to refer to something that you have already named in the same sentence), but when you are saying ... he aprendido mucho de los. you are actually ending the sentence with an articucle, not a pronoun. That's why it sounds off. You are actually saying, "I have learnt a lot form the", not "I have learnt a lot from them". Some ...


2

En efecto hay verbos que siempre necesitan ir con un pronombre. Se llaman verbos pronominales (o pronominados) El verbo pronominal es aquel que se conjuga con un pronombre átono en todas sus formas (me, te, se, os, le, lo, la, les, los, las, se, nos). Hay verbos estrictamente pronominales, que son los que siempre necesitan este pronombre. Peinar lo ...


2

Since you see: ¿El director les quiere dar el guión a los actores? It only refers to a singular noun, so the answer would be : "Sí, quiere dárselo.


2

No es un chilenismo, pero sí es usado en Chile de manera frecuente también para referirnos a las personas que no tuteamos: se va a caer. (Cuando no tuteamos.) o bien te vas a caer. (En donde se va suprimido y reemplazado por te porque podemos tutear al individuo. Ahora bien, el uso del se es muy usado para hacer referencia a una cosa o persona. ...



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