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9

The words qué, cuál/es, quién/es, cómo, cuán, cuánto/a/os/as, cuándo, dónde y adónde are written with acute accent (tilde diacrítica) when used in an interrogative or exclamatory manner. You can read this in RAE, There is no difference in meaning but when you see any of those words in a question without the accent, it is wrong.


7

I'll be the contrarian here. ¿que es eso? is a valid Spanish construction and distinct from ¿qué es eso? With the accent, the phrase means "What is that?" because qué is an interrogative pronoun. But without the accent, the phrase means something more akin to "You mean it's that?" The word que (no accent) is often used in spoken Spanish to start off ...


4

The word "lo" is the neutral definite article. It is used when you need to use the definite article to refer to an abstract concept that comes from an adjective. In essence, "lo suficiente" means "that which is sufficient". This article is always used with the adjective in singular masculine form, i.e. "lo suficiente" is grammatically correct but "lo ...


4

"Suficiente" is an adjective, and as such determines a noun: No queda suficiente comida. There is a special case that can also determine a verb: when it precedes by a neutral article "lo" (quantitative lo) and works as an adverb of quantity. This situation occurs only with 5 adjectives: No nos concentramos lo suficiente No traes lo necesario ...


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Should be "¿Qué es eso?", with an acute accent, as explained in DPD: Qué: Palabra tónica, que debe escribirse con tilde a diferencia del pronombre relativo o de la conjunción que.


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(1) "Que" (without accent) is equivalent to "that". For example: I guess that you are Anne. Supongo que eres Anne. (2) "Cual" (without accent) is quite equivalent to "whom". For example: Anne is the woman whom Jhon got married. Anne es la mujer con la cual Jhon se casó. (3) Their accent marked form is used when asking. All interrogatory ...


2

To complement the previous answer, the function of lo is to render the adjective into a noun. So, you can have sentences like lo bonito siempre atrae más, where bonito is an adjective rendered into a noun. It is just the compressed version of lo que es bonito. With your sentence is the same thing, lo suficiente is just lo que era suficiente with some words ...


1

This also applies to the defining or non-defining relative clauses. We use que for the relative pronouns who & which: This is the nurse who helped me = Esta es la enfermera que me ayudó. This is the farm which was built in 1978 = Esta es la granja que se construyó en 1978. However, this can be even more complicated because we introduce que in ...


1

Suficiente viene a ser cuando lo que tienes es justo lo que necesitas, ni más ni menos, por ejemplo: ¡suficiente!, ¡ya no peleen mas! pero en cambio lo suficiente, es cuando se habla acerca de algún objeto que tenga como acción ser suficiente, en general se usa como que algún objeto pueda o no ser lo necesario, por ejemplo: ¿crees que la carne ...


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In "no lo conozco", the "lo" stands for "him". Therefore making it I don't know "him" as opposed to "no conozco" which would just mean "I don't know".



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