Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

23

Sorry, I don't speak English Es una duplicación del complemento directo. En español culto, cuando el complemento directo o indirecto se antepone al verbo y no es un pronombre, entonces es obligatorio añadir el pronombre átono también antepuesto al verbo. La tarta la llevo yo. (yo llevo la tarta). La tarta no la llevo yo. (yo no llevo la tarta) ...


18

According to Wikipedia's article on voseo, the geographical distribution can be split into three categories: Countries where voseo is predominant: Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica Countries where both forms are used: Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Venezuela Countries where vos is ...


18

Usted comes from Vuestra Merced (later Vuesarced), meaning "Your Grace". Since this was an indirect way of addressing someone, it was inflected in the third person. That is, strictly speaking, you are not addressing the person, but "Their Grace". As time went on, the person inflection was kept, even though its origins became opaque. In a study entitled El ...


17

In Spain we would say either of these: Trátame de tú. Tutéame. Or, in a more indirect way: No me trates de usted. Any of them in a cheerful manner and usually accompanied by the perceptive "por favor" if needed.


17

English The difference is not very clear and borders on the idiomatic, but I'd say that cuál implies that there is a known set of options from which to choose, while qué is more general. So ¿Cuál libro prefieres? implies that there are a couple of books in front of you and you need to choose from those. Español La diferencia no está muy clara y ronda ...


16

La primera distinción que haría es con "vós": es muy común en el español latinoamericano, pero no se usa en el peninsular (el de España). Por lo tanto, en España es mejor evitarlo completamente. El uso de "tú" y "usted" es más complicado. Hablaré por el uso en España, que es el que conozco. En teoría se usa "usted" con todas las personas adultas, pero en ...


15

Usted is a descendent of medieval Spanish Vuestra Merced, meaning "your mercy". It was an expression used to address upper classes in feudal Spain and evolved to be the general form of respectful address in the language in the seventeenth century or later. The letters "u" and "v" — like the letters "i" and "j" — were written the same in Latin. The choice of ...


13

This confusion is easy to resolve once you understand that Spanish is an inflected language, so verbs are marked (that is, changed) to reflect things like tense, person, and number. (See Wikipedia: Spanish Grammar.) Describing all of the diffrent types of inflections and verb changes is a lengthy process and beyond the scope of a single answer, so I'll try ...


12

Este tipo de pronombres que funcionan como complemento verbal no preposicional se denominan, en general, pronombres clíticos. Cuando anteceden al verbo (me encanta; lo dijo; se fue) se llaman proclíticos y cuando siguen al verbo (ayúdame, díselo, vete) se llaman enclíticos. La colocación de los pronombres clíticos delante o detrás del verbo no es libre, ...


11

Use the pronoun when it clarifies an ambiguity: Leería el libro. This is vague without further context. It could mean "I would read the book" or "He/she would read the book." So the addition of a pronoun (or other context) is necessary. Or use a pronoun for emphasis. Él leyó el libro. Yo leí la revista. "He read the book. I read the ...


10

Sí, se pueden usar. Yo soy una mujer, y cuando estoy con mis amigas, se puede decir: Nosotras vamos al cine. También se puede referir a nuestro grupo en la misma forma. Alguien me ha dicho que vosotras vais al cine.


10

In this case le is a dative pronoun. You are correct in assuming it is redundant, as it actually is. :) Wikitionary has a very interesting entry on the subject that treats upon it in a usage note. It reads: Note that when a sentence contains a noun that is an indirect object, a redundant indirect object le (or its plural form les) is also required. ...


10

TÚ: Se usa con amigos, con todos los parientes (puede haber excepciones) y en situaciones informales. VOS: Solo se usa en ciertas partes de Latinoamérica, principalmente en Argentina, Uruguay, Guatemala y algunas otras partes de Centroamérica y Sudamérica (Chile, Colombia, partes de Bolivia). Todo el mundo sabe hablar de "tú", pero no todo el mundo sabe ...


10

Vuestra merced evolved to usted. Vuestra merced is a really antique way to say something like your highness (not literally though).


10

When it precedes a noun, the rule is simple: use "qué". "Cuál" is traditionally considered incorrect (though apparently common nonetheless) in this case. Otherwise, it's probably being followed by a form of "ser". In this case, you want "cuál" unless you are seeking a definition. "¿Qué es el color?" — "What is color?" (i.e., what sort of thing is ...


10

"El bar" is the business, the place from the door to the toilets. "La barra" is the desk where the waiter works. The first one is a copy from the english "bar" with the meaning of "pub". The second one is the translation of the english "bar" with the meaning of, well, a bar inside a pub.


10

The Nobel prize Camilo José Cela once said: "No es lo mismo estar dormido que estar durmiendo, como no es lo mismo estar jodido que estar jodiendo.". The anecdote surrounding this funny quote illustrates well how the usage of gerund ("dormido", "jodido") and past participle ("durmiendo", "dormido") don't always carry the same meaning. Apparently Cela, as ...


10

Puede ser para ofrecer cercanía con el publico al que se dirige. La forma usted es mucho mas formal y desde luego implica respeto, pero eso no quiere decir que la forma tú carezca de él. Creo que en este caso hay mucho contexto en el canal. Puedo decirte, como nativo hispanohablante, que usted puede tener connotaciones negativas. Cuando yo tenía alrededor ...


9

No hay ninguna ambigüedad en el asunto: siempre debe existir concordancia de número (y de género en otros casos) entre el pronombre y el referente. Por lo tanto sólo estos casos son correctos: Ella le dice a él. Ella les dice a ellos. Cualquier otro caso es incorrecto, aunque su uso sea habitual. Lee el item 6.a de lo referente a pronombres ...


8

Tanto "tú", como "vos" como "usted" sigfinican (en Inglés) "you". Son la segunda persona del singular. Pero lo importante es tener en cuenta la formalidad y la region. Si es formal, se debería usar "usted". Si es informal, dependiendo de la region debería usar "tú" o "vos"


8

As I understand, que is used commonly for definition, where cual refers to selecting or identifying. ¿Qué es el mate? Es una infusion que se bebe en Uruguay, en Paraguay y en Argentina. ¿Cuál es la moneda de México? El peso mexicano. ¿Qué es una galaxia? Un immenso conjunto de estrellas, gas, y polvo. ¿Cuál es la galaxia más cercana a la ...


8

The correct order can be remembered by the acronym RID (as in, "I need to get RID of this confusion about pronouns!") for reflexive, indirect, direct. All three pronouns can't appear together, but two can in the following combinations: Reflexive-Indirect: Se me olvidó. ("I forgot." or literally "It forgot itself to me.") Reflexive-Direct: Me lo pongo. ("I ...


8

En el Manual de la Nueva Gramática de la Lengua Española, apartado 16.4.3a. Última frase. Se consideran también incorrectas las construcciones, propias de la lengua descuidada, en las que el mismo pronombre aparece a la vez como enclítico y como proclítico: *se debe respetarse cualquier opinión; *se lo tengo que decírselo Google Books, Manual de la ...


8

La expresión procede, en efecto, de fórmulas corteses o formales. Por ejemplo, respondiendo a una pregunta: ¿Es usted Pedro Pérez? Para servirle [o Para servirle a usted; similar al inglés at your service]. En la antefirma de una carta: Su seguro servidor [equivalente al inglés yours truly o incluso your humble servant] Y, finalmente, al ...


8

los is an article. The right pronoun in this case is ellos. Otherwise it is a perfectly correct sentence, with a couple corrections: Muchas gracias por tus excelentes libros y videos. He aprendido mucho de ellos.


8

In Spanish we have several constructions that can translate your sentence, That's the one that I eat the chicken with: Es con esa que me como el pollo Con esa es con la que me como el pollo Es con esa con la que me como el pollo Esa es con la que me como el pollo Maybe the most grammatically correct is the first one, but I'd say the other three ...


7

As a native speaker I want to point out that not having 'le' in there sounds broken. I think the reason it's required is because you can have sentences without specific targets like this: "Yo di mi anillo." "I gave my ring." This has a kind of "broad" flavor, in that not only does the meaning lack a specific target, there is also a suggestion of the target ...


7

Qué and cuál are interrogatory pronouns, and are thus used when asking questions (see relevant question): ¿Qué ha ocurrido? → What has happened? ¿Cuál es tu número de teléfono? → What is your phone number? Qué can also be an exclamative adjective (if it is used before a noun): ¿Qué hora es? → What time is it? Qué can also be ...


7

Yo soy de Madrid y tengo laísmo, leísmo y loísmo cuando hablo, pero si lo pienso (al escribir) suelo darme cuenta y lo corrijo. El laísmo, leísmo y loísmo está tan arraigado en Castilla que yo no me enteré que era laísta, leísta y loísta hasta que tuve 20 años. Correcto: Objeto directo masculino o neutro: siempre "lo" Objeto directo femenino: siempre "la" ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible