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9

Es un vulgarismo que debe ser evitado: por analogía con el resto de los tiempos verbales (dices, decías, dirás...), a la segunda persona (tú) se le añade como vulgarismo una –s final, y así encontramos el vulgarismo: Tú dijistes* En España, es común encontrar esto en la mitad norte, como dice aquí: En el habla de las tierras donde nació ...


8

The reason traces back to the Latin forms (and possibly farther back than that). In Latin, duco/ducere "to lead" changes "c" to "x" (c+s = x) to form the perfect tense: duxi, duxisti, duxit, ... This verb is the root of traducir, conducir, etc. Latin "x" normally corresponds with Spanish "j", hence conduje, condujiste, condujo, .... Although most Spanish ...


8

"Traducir" is an irregular verb that follows the conjugation model of "conducir". In Spanish there are a few irregular verbs, some of them are completely irregular and others just partially. At the conjugation site of Instituto de Verbología Hispánica you can find the 101 conjugation models in Spanish with the list of irregulars; and this data base allows ...


8

Before your question, I never heard nor read about Spanish verbs that change their meaning when used in some preterite verbal tense. So I read about it, and I found out that: This issue is mainly a way to teach Spanish verbs to English speaking students. This issue is not formally stated in Spanish grammar. For example, when you analyse the verb saber, ...


7

Para responder esta pregunta primero es necesario entender el tiempo verbal copretérito. Este tiempo indica: Una acción pasada que sucedió al mismo tiempo que otra. Una acción pasada que no se sabe cuando terminó o que no ha terminado. Basándome en el ejemplo y en el título de la pregunta, infiero que estamos en el primer caso. El primer ...


5

As you say "Supo" means "found out" and "Sabía" means "Knew" which are not the same. But, answering your question, it's about if the action has a stated timeframe. María lo supo ayer. = Maria found out yesterday. This means a completed action. Juan sabía que María venía. = Juan knew that Maria was coming. This doesn't provide definite beginning ...


5

If you check RAE you'll find the answer here and in this othe link with more details. Depending on the different grammars published there are different names. There are 2 simple tenses for past Pretérito imperfecto /Copretérito [de indicativo/ subjuntivo] (Pretérito imperfecto is the most used) E.g. En indicativo, amaba, temía, vivía; en ...


5

Imperfect, always. That is the correct tense to use whenever you have an habitual action in the past. Edit: As César mentioned, a possible literal translation of your example would be Ellos solían viajar todos los días Whether you use solían, and cada día vs. todos los días will depend on how the sentence continues and what is the main point you ...


5

1 - "El hombre hubo de ser comido por Godzilla". It is correct, but it suggest there exists some kind of doubt about what is being said. It's not the most usual way of saying something like that, "El hombre debió haber sido comido por Godzilla" works and it's used. 2 and 3- "Hubo" it's heavily used in my country Uruguay, and in Argentina, as indicating ...


3

1) When you say: El hombre ha sido comido por Godzilla You are following this structure: (object) (verb "ser") (participle of verb) (rest of complements) So "hubo sido comido" is not right because you're using another structure: (object) (past of "haber") (participle of "ser") (participle of verb) (rest of complements) Which is not what you want: ...


3

La respuesta de Sergio es muy exhaustiva. Aun asi, doy mi opinión sobre "uso habitual": No vi nada mientras estaba corriendo : Me suena perfecto. El "mientras" indica una acción de una cierta duración, así que el "estaba corriendo", que indica una acción que quizá aún no hubiera terminado, suena perfectamente. No vi nada mientras corrí : Suena muy forzado, ...


3

Pretérito simply means past. RAE has an excellent explanation of all of them, but here's a very simplified summary. There are 3 different forms: Pretérito Perfecto (preterite perfect) Pretérito Imperfecto (preterite imperfect) Pretérito Pluscuamperfecto (pluperfect) In turn, preterite perfect subdivides in: a. Preterite [perfect] simple - Ex: ...


3

Pensé/Pensaba and Creí/Creía are just different conjugations of the verbs Pensar/Creer. The first form (pensé/creí) is preterite simple and the second form (pensaba/creía) is preterite imperfect. Here's a link that explains it well. Pensé que me amaba (I thought you loved me) is as valid and has the same meaning as saying Pensaba que me amaba, for ...


2

To me, as Randolf and Martin have pointed out in their answers, there is a slight difference in the timeframe. "No supo la respuesta" sounds to me like "no supo qué responder en ese momento". So for example, about an exam, you could say, "me preguntaron X, y no supe la respuesta". It doesn't mean I didn't have the knowledge, but I was unable to give a ...


2

In Spanish you may omit the subject (in this case, ustedes) when the verb hints at it (sujeto tácito), so the commonly used form is the following: ¿Hicieron su tarea de hoy? Why not ¿Hicieron su tarea para hoy??. Let me explain the difference with another example: ¿Construyeron el muro para María?     means to ask if the wall ...


2

As to why people use it being incorrect, I guess it has to do with the second person plural being similar, but ended in s (-asteis, -isteis), mixed with what they hear around them and a certain illiteracy or carelessness about language. And about where it is used, I can´t really tell. I know in Spain there are regions where it is more prevalent (e.g. the ...


2

“Indefinido” in this case is meant to be the translation of Greek “aoristos”, which means “undefined, unlimited, indeterminate”, and is a verbal tense in Ancient Greek. RAE chose it to highlight the contrast between that verbal tense and its composite counterpart. It wasn't a fortunate naming, and in 1973 they changed it to “pretérito perfecto simple”. ...


2

La forma “hubo + participio” (llamada pretérito anterior o antepretérito) sigue vigente en el español escrito en su registro culto y se usa en literatura y en el buen periodismo. La búsqueda con Google de “cuando hubo terminado” recupera 1.400.000 páginas. Es verdad que el pretérito anterior se usa muy poco en el habla, pero se oye a veces, en un registro ...


2

In spanish the first tends to be used when the speaker you are reffering is decided to do it, while the second one is conditioned and he/she won't do it due to something. Maybe with the verb comprar in this example we cannot apply the general rule from Presente to Pretérito Imperfecto del indicativo except if we specify when because the verb itself only ...


2

First things first: By "pero" you mean "perro" , am i right?. :-) 1) Means he was doing that while talking. Sound to me like: Dijo que estaba comprando... (He/she said he was buying the dog). At the same moment of talking. 2) Means that he/she would buy the dog in the future from the moment of the conversation, but... we still don't know if he really did ...


2

First of all, a disclaimer, the usage of 'pretérito perfecto' (se ha roto) and 'pretérito indefinido' (se rompió) varies with the region. Some regions in Spain (like Leon) and I believe most of Latin America prefer the use of 'pretérito indefinido' over 'pretérito perfecto'. Despite having said that, here I will describe the common usage in Spain. Both ...


1

This one is correct if he broke it this summer and now (3 months later) he STILL can't walk: Este verano mi vecino se rompió la pierna y no ha podido caminar por tres meses. This is correct if he broke it this summer, and he WAS not able to walk for three months (but now can): Este verano mi vecino se rompió la pierna y no pudo caminar por tres meses. This ...


1

The difference is quite subtle. In the first case, you are pretty confident that the person will do as she said, while in the second case you are not so confident. The conditional always expresses a possibility and not a certainty. María dijo que compraba el perro --> María said that she was buying the dog and you have no reason to believe that she did not ...


1

When I learned grammar at school (ca. 1983) they use two different naming system for the verbal tenses. They were called "Spanish" (as from Spain) and "Andrés Bello" (in reference to the 19th century scholar who described it) For the indicative mood, the tenses were: Simple tenses Presente simple (S) = Presente (AB): camino Pretérito indefinido (S) = ...


1

Hay cinco pasados en español y los cuatro están en uso. Pretérito indefinido: hubo Pretérito imperfecto: había Pasado perfecto: ha habido Pretérito anterior: hubo habido Pretérito pluscuamperfecto: había habido Este último, que supongo que es al que te refieres, se sule usar en en frases subordinadas o coordinadas en pasado.


1

No creo que sea eliminado del español moderno. "Que Hubo" es un saludo informal y jergal. Una busqueda por el internet me dio unos articulos que usan el pretérito de haber. Artículo1 Artículo2 Libro1 Libro de gramática En el libro de gramática usa haber como un verbo auxiliar: En cuanto hube acabado de limpiar toda la casa, finalicé de cocinar el ...


1

At first, the comparison has to be between "creí + pensé" versus "creía + pensaba". As for regular and daily usage, creía and pensaba are more common when you are talking about the past. And for the difference: Creí and Pensé define a very specific moment: Aquel día, pensé que me moría. Creía and Pensaba refer to a belief/thought you had, but changed ...


1

Simple answer: all mean the same, "I had this idea in the past". Long answer: In the context of "I had this idea in the past" in English happens the same, you can choose between "believe" and "think". In Spanish, just use the translation of what you would use in English for that context, it's the same, I guess from indo-european roots. So, for "believe" use ...


1

I believe that the preterite refers to the IMMINENCE of the verb. For instance, puedo and podía refer to "could have done it" in the present and past respectively, which represent POTENTIAL. Pudo (the preterite) means she just DID it, not she could have done it, and of course no pudo means the opposite. In the other example, Sé and Sabía means know and ...


1

I guess one possible explanation in this particular case would be: sabía, is used when the the person, actually, didn't know the answer. supo is used when he knows the answer, but somehow is hidden from his mind at that moment. If you give him enough time he could have figured out the answer by himself. So he knew (somehow), but he ...



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