Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

23

Ambas expresiones son correctas, aunque a Un vaso de agua a menudo se la critica (erróneamente) por pensarse que implica que el vaso está hecho de agua. Cuando decimos una taza de leche o un plato de sopa a nadie se le ocurre que las tazas están hechas de leche o que los platos están hechos de sopa. Como vemos, en estos casos el significado de la preposición ...


14

The examples you wrote about are not phrasal verbs. I don't think there is such a thing as phrasal verbs in Spanish. They are verbs that sometimes change their meaning totally. For example, the verb "to take" means that you grab something with your hands and you lift it up (an example). The verb "to take after" doesn't mean that you grab later, or at least ...


10

The difference is simple: Deber + infinitive is used to express obligation: You must do it as soon as possible. Deber de + infinitive is used to express probability or supposition: It must be very early. Sometimes, in the second case the preposition "de" is omitted, so it might be confusing. So the first case could also be interpretated as the ...


9

Do Y instead of X can be said as Haz Y en vez de X Haz Y en lugar de X If you want to ommit X because it is understood in the context you can say: Haz Y en su lugar. There "su" refers to something mentioned before, which should be X. But you can't say: Haz Y en vez de *. (incorrect) Haz Y en lugar de *. (incorrect) because ...


8

El niño debe hacer su tarea. This sentence means obligation: The kid must do his job. A similar sentence could be "El niño tiene que hacer su tarea." El niño debe de hacer su tarea. The construction "deber de" means supposition or possibility. I'm not sure this usage applies to your example as is. But another example can be: Deben de ser ...


8

Remember that "gustar" means "to please" unlike the English "like" which essentially means "to be pleased by." So what you're saying is: Is reading pleasing to your children? When you state it this way, the obvious translation becomes: ¿Leer les gusta a vuestros hijos? And then the necesity of the 'a' becomes more clear, as in this case it is a ...


7

You shouldn't use that "contracted" form since it is a mistake. From the RAE: En la lengua culta debe evitarse el uso de adverbios como cerca, detrás, delante, debajo, dentro, encima, enfrente con adjetivos posesivos; así pues, no debe decirse ×detrás mío, ×encima suya, etc., sino detrás de mí, encima de él, etc. In cultivated language ...


7

From here (with minor corrections by me): Uses for por: Expressing movement along, through, around, by or about: Anduve por las calles de la ciudad. I walked through the streets of the city. Denoting a time or duration when something occurs. Viajamos por tres semanas. We're traveling for three ...


6

It doesn't let me add comments probably because I'm new here but "vartec"'s answer is the best one. I am a native Spanish speaker and if you want to say glass of water then is "vaso de agua". End of the question. In special cases, as if you are in a laboratory and you need a glass with water for some experiment you'd possibly say "vaso con agua" to especify ...


6

Your two examples are actually different phenomena. Ex. 1) ¿A vuestros hijos les gusta leer? Consider the following statements: Me gusta leer. Me gusta leer a mí. A mí, me gusta leer. You can always add the a mí for emphasis. Similarly, you can add an "a [person]" to clarify who the pronoun refers to, in the more ambiguous case of les. Ex. 2) Todos ...


6

"Trabajar para <alguien>" means to work for someone else: Él es mi empleado. Trabaja para mí. He is my employee. He works for me. "Trabajar por <algo>" means to work to advance one's own cause or ends: Él trabaja por sus hijos. He works for his children's sake. UPDATE: As suggested by @Trufa, "trabajar por <alguien>" could ...


6

Darse de alta equivale a inscribirse y lleva la misma preposición: en. Sospecho que el uso de a se debe a una confusión con la palabra suscribirse, con la que sí rige dicha proposición y que a veces también puede actuar como sinónimo de las anteriores: Me he inscrito en el grupo de discusión Me he dado de alta en el grupo de discusión Me he suscrito al ...


5

According to RAE, they can both be used interchangeably, but: if what follows is a noun, normally de is used if what follows is a sentence, any of them can be used


5

In these Word Reference threads, "por nada", "por nada vs de nada", "No hay de que; de nada; por nada", almost everyone says it's the same expression and it depends on everyone's choice. But in the second one, someone says "por nada" is regarded as kind of rude in Spain. I am not sure about this, but I can say that while studying Spanish (note: I learnt the ...


5

Yes, It has an additional meaning. De, a, hacia, desde, etc are prepositions, and they are used to fine tune the verb they are with. De usually points to the passive recipient of the action (I don't know the actual term). For example: Escaparse de la policia - To escape from the cops In this case you're doing the escaping, but the cops are being the ...


5

The first sentence: nuevos zapatos por España Doesn't really make sense. I mean someone that speaks Spanish would not understand what you mean. In that sentence when i read it, that "por" feels like "for" in the sentence "for the cause". Although in some places people would understand "tenis" as Alfredo said. It is not really that used in many ...


4

When trying to express you are thinking of someone, you always use pensar en. Without en preposition, you could express something strange, as of you are trying to "invent" or "deducing" someone: Estoy pensando en ti  →  I'm thinking of you. Estoy pensándote  →  (something like: trying to deduce you, but very very strange). ...


4

I'd say the differences are very subtle, and in most cases you could use any of the three options without much difference. But anyway: "La razón para" generally would be used as "the reason for", as in "the reason to do something we have done in the past or are planning to do in the future". La razón para ilegalizar las drogas es que son malas para la ...


4

The current use in Spain is: acerca de is never used with this meaning; its only use is meaning about in an informal context, whenever you can choose between the adverb cerca and the adjective cercano/a, use the first in a more formal context or in writing, you can use either cerca or cercano/a So I wouldn't say Tenemos una casa cercana al aeropuerto, ...


4

En las comparaciones se usa "que"; sin embargo, lo usual es "de lo normal" y no "que lo normal". Cuando se compara con "lo normal", se usa "de" como caso excepcional. Toda comparación con lo normal, como "más cansado de lo normal" convierte el significado en "especialmente cansado", lo que no ocurre en otras comparaciones.


3

Another possibility is "en cambio". It's not the same as "en su lugar/en lugar de", and the difference is rather tricky to explain, and also the construction. "Aprende español, en cambio" is about ok, but "En cambio, aprende español" or "Aprende, en cambio, español" are better.


3

The use of prepositions is very idiomatic, both in English and Spanish; by that I mean that as a native speaker they just sound right to you, but when you're learning the language, often they don't make sense or seem arbitraty (at least, this has happened to me). And, well, I guess they are. Anyway, "a" is not the only preposition used with "oler" and ...


3

"Correr en una dirección" es lo más natural, para significar una orientación general (dirección y sentido) (ej: en dirección norte). "Correr hacia " se usa más bien para significar un destino puntual ("Corrió hacia su casa") "Correr a (un lugar)" suena un poco más coloquial y menos correcto, aunque es usada como reemplazo de "Correr hacia" ("Corrió a su ...


3

para indicates direction or intention por indicates origin or cause A Spanish teacher explained the difference with an "intention arrow". In the case of 'para', the intention moves from the subject to the direct object: Las flores son para ti. flores -> ti Yo trabajo para ti. yo -> ti [I work for/to please you] In the case of ...


3

They are exact synonyms (as RAE says), you can use any of them to replace the other because there's no difference in meaning or grammar. sobre (RAE definition) prep. Encima de. prep. acerca de.


3

From DRAE a2: prep. Precede al complemento de nombres y verbos de percepción y sensación, para precisar la sensación correspondiente. Sabor a miel. Huele a chamusquina. It's just a preposition without any specific meaning used to indicate the actual sensation in these verbs. If you want to introduce uncertainty with "como", you still need the "a": ...


3

Como bien dice A109201, la construcción correcta es ir a + infinitivo. En el Diccionario Panhispánico de Dudas tienes una descripción de esta perífrasis verbal: ir a + infinitivo. Perífrasis verbal que indica que la acción designada por el infinitivo se va a producir en un futuro más o menos inmediato: «Vas a tener miles de problemas» (Gamboa Páginas ...


3

acerca de is more literally related to the English concept of about, both convey the concept of "near or around", in a figurative (and sometimes literal) sense. sobre usually translates to the English word on. Therefore, as with many phrases and words, you must translate the concept more than the word. The book is about cats. He was running about. ...


2

The most common uses: You'd use "por" in case of contract type: trabaja por cuenta ajena; (hired work) trabaja por cuenta propia / trabaja por libre; (freelance) trabaja por horas; You'd also use "por" in case of the work's objective: trabaja por la paz en el Medio Oriente; You'd use "para" in case of employee/employer relation: trabaja para la ...


2

Jaime, there's simply no rule or case when para con is preferable than con or simply para. Remember that para con is just a formal preposition combination (I'll agree that rarely used), but its emphatic meaning make it well suited for its use within legal documents (just to super-clarify). Anyway, you can just use hacia, en relación a or just para.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible