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5

Según el diccionario panhispánico de dudas Resume en 6 partes la transcripción de topónimos. Topónimos con forma tradicional plenamente vigente en español, que, no obstante, aparecen con cierta frecuencia en los medios de comunicación con nombres o grafías propios de otras lenguas. Se prefiere la forma española, a no ser que haya caído en desuso o se ...


5

Caribbean countries barely pronounce the ending S at all, Colombians, Cubans, Puerto Ricans. Manu Chao is quite a case. Since he (or mano negra / Former band) sings in French, Spanish, Portuguese, English and even in a dialect used between France, Spain and Portugal, which I can't remember the name. Grammatically speaking, when you write it THE S MUST GO, ...


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Se llama lenguaje con ortografía fonológica (English: phonemic orthography) En una ortografía fonológica cada grafema se corresponde con un fonema.


4

No estoy seguro de si hay otros términos para referirse al mismo hecho, pero yo lo he visto escrito como idioma u ortografía «transparentes». Es decir, que posee un sistema ortográfico en el que existe un alto grado de correspondencia entre los grafemas (símbolos escritos) y los fonemas (sonidos pronunciados). Esto no se reduce a las vocales, sino que abarca ...


4

Debuccalization is a sound change that consists in a consonant losing its original place of articulation becoming [h] o [ʔ]. Saying place of articulation, we mean one of these: 1. Exo-labial, 2. Endo-labial, 3. Dental, 4. Alveolar, 5. Post-alveolar, 6. Pre-palatal, 7. Palatal, 8. Velar, 9. Uvular, 10. Pharyngeal, 11. Glottal, 12. Epiglottal, 13. ...


3

Spanish has a mostly phonetic reading (as opposed to writing*). Most exceptions are in three categories: reductions, assimilations and similar phonemic changes archaic language foreign and indigenous words In the first category we include hiatus reduced to diphthongs toalla→/tualla/, pelear→/peliar/, elimination of geminated vowels: cooperar→/coperar/, ...


2

Are there exceptions to the (quite simple) spanish phonetic rules? Basically, no. Unless you count any of the following as exceptions (I wouldn't, but it's debatable) : Foreign names or words of foreign origin, that retain its original spelling but are pronounced differently: "sandwich" (pronounced as "sángüich" or even "sánguche"). Regional ...


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There are many foreign words that don't follow Spanish phonetic rules, even though they are heavily used in Spanish. The only "Spanish" word I can think of off the top of my head that doesn't follow Spanish phonetics is a Mexican slang word: Güey Although it is spelled with a 'G', the g sound is not pronounced (depending on region). As written, the ...



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