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7

It's dialectal, but very widespread. In many parts of Southern Spain and South America it's common to omit the last "s". It's never correct in standard Spanish.


7

Are there exceptions to the (quite simple) spanish phonetic rules? Basically, no. Unless you count any of the following as exceptions (I wouldn't, but it's debatable) : Foreign names or words of foreign origin, that retain its original spelling but are pronounced differently: "sandwich" (pronounced as "sángüich" or even "sánguche"). Regional ...


6

Según el diccionario panhispánico de dudas Resume en 6 partes la transcripción de topónimos. Topónimos con forma tradicional plenamente vigente en español, que, no obstante, aparecen con cierta frecuencia en los medios de comunicación con nombres o grafías propios de otras lenguas. Se prefiere la forma española, a no ser que haya caído en desuso o se ...


6

Spanish has a mostly phonetic reading (as opposed to writing*). Most exceptions are in three categories: reductions, assimilations and similar phonemic changes archaic language foreign and indigenous words In the first category we include hiatus reduced to diphthongs toalla→/tualla/, pelear→/peliar/, elimination of geminated vowels: cooperar→/coperar/, ...


5

Caribbean countries barely pronounce the ending S at all, Colombians, Cubans, Puerto Ricans. Manu Chao is quite a case. Since he (or mano negra / Former band) sings in French, Spanish, Portuguese, English and even in a dialect used between France, Spain and Portugal, which I can't remember the name. Grammatically speaking, when you write it THE S MUST GO, ...


4

Se llama lenguaje con ortografía fonológica (English: phonemic orthography) En una ortografía fonológica cada grafema se corresponde con un fonema.


4

No estoy seguro de si hay otros términos para referirse al mismo hecho, pero yo lo he visto escrito como idioma u ortografía «transparentes». Es decir, que posee un sistema ortográfico en el que existe un alto grado de correspondencia entre los grafemas (símbolos escritos) y los fonemas (sonidos pronunciados). Esto no se reduce a las vocales, sino que abarca ...


4

Debuccalization is a sound change that consists in a consonant losing its original place of articulation becoming [h] o [ʔ]. Saying place of articulation, we mean one of these: 1. Exo-labial, 2. Endo-labial, 3. Dental, 4. Alveolar, 5. Post-alveolar, 6. Pre-palatal, 7. Palatal, 8. Velar, 9. Uvular, 10. Pharyngeal, 11. Glottal, 12. Epiglottal, 13. ...


1

I would reverse the question. How is it that such varied sounds came to be represented by the same letter? It is the oral language that is the natural language. The written language is added later. In Spanish, the sound that is represented by the jota used to be represented by the equis. Examples: Mexico, Texas. The change was part of a general ...


1

There are many foreign words that don't follow Spanish phonetic rules, even though they are heavily used in Spanish. The only "Spanish" word I can think of off the top of my head that doesn't follow Spanish phonetics is a Mexican slang word: Güey Although it is spelled with a 'G', the g sound is not pronounced (depending on region). As written, the ...



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