Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

-aba/-ía is for past verbs (not participle), but -ado/-ido holds for past participle verbs. I have waited ends in -ado because you're using past participle. To use esperaba we put I waited which also translates to "yo esperé," it all depends of the context so won't know whether it is "esperaba" or "esperé" if you don't know what the context is. ...


0

I'm not familiar with the Michel Thomas Method, but I'm sure it wouldn't hurt you to read up on conjugations. he, has, ha, han, and hemos are not prefixes by any stretch of the imagination. Each are the present indicative conjugation of the verb haber. Haber is an (nearly always) auxiliary verb (helping verb). This is the verb that allows us to create ...


2

At a normal, informal conversation, He did it everyday Él lo hacía todos los días is equivalent to lo ha hecho todos los días. More specifically, they are different conjugations, you may check it here: http://www.wordreference.com/conj/EsVerbs.aspx?v=hacer Hacía is the pretérito imperfecto, and ha hecho is pretérito perfecto compuesto. There is a subtle ...



Top 50 recent answers are included