Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

Most probably, it is baking powder of the brand Royal.


10

No, no es correcto. Se ha pregungado a la RAE sobre aterrizar vs. alunizar vs. amartizar, y esta es la respuesta oficial: El verbo amartizar (formado sobre el sustantivo Marte a imitación de aterrizar) no está admitido por las Academias ni se recoge en el DRAE. Se trata de una creación innecesaria, puesto que aterrizar se define como ‘dicho de un avión o ...


8

It is a regional variant of "haya" (first and third singular person, subjunctive present of the verb "haber"). You will hear that word from some people with low education in a natural manner, and also from well-educated people in an informal conversation, either trying to make a joke or just put emphasis on the word by pronouncing it incorrectly (especially ...


8

"estupefacto" me parece bastante contundente y de uso general, aunque quizás no tan "colorida". Igualmente correcta es "atónito" Más informales (quizás más coloridas) serían: "turulato" (no se usa mucho) y "patitieso" (esta me suena algo más común que "patidifuso").


7

Initially I figured this was a mere misspelling for ilícito. That said, I pulled up the document it seems you got this from, and I'm more inclined to say it an odd calque from English (or Latin, given that's ultimately where we got it from) to Spanish. The OED defines elicit (adj.) as “Of an act: Evolved immediately from an active power or quality; ...


7

No soy de colombia pero si se refiere a lo mismo que en México es literalmente un horno hecho de tabiques o ladrillos. Además de utilizarse en la panaderia tradicional latina son muy comunes en Italia y es donde tradicionalmente se cocinaban las pizzas. En la parte inferior/posterior del horno se coloca leña y en el frente el alimento a cocer, la piedra ...


6

Sí, existen. Por ejemplo: murciélago, abuelito, arquitecto... Aquí hay una lista con más de 40.000 palabras pentavocálicas.


5

As Chewie pointed out, Most probably, it is baking powder of the brand Royal. The appropriate name is "levadura en polvo" in Spain or "polvos de hornear" in some South American countries. The use of Royal is a generic name such as using "Scotch tape" instead of "sticky tape".


5

Sin duda se usa palabras modularidad y modularización, aunque no se encuentran en el diccinario de RAE. Por tanto me parece logico usar modularizar. Se puede encontrar varios ejemplos con dicha palabra: http://www.sidar.org/recur/desdi/traduc/es/xhtml/modxhtml/index.html http://www.fio.unicen.edu.ar/usuario/ariera/b6-0/Tutoriales/tut_Modularizacion.pdf ...


5

It's a juxtaposition of barroca and rocanrolera Barroco as plenty of adornments (luxury) Rocanrolera as plenty of rock & roll


5

You couldn't find apercibido in RAE, because it's participle of verb apercibir. As for desapercibido vs inadvertido. Desapercibido is most commonly used as for something that was not noted (possibly just because it was not important enough to anyone). Inadvertido in contrast means something that was not foreseen. Very common usage is pasar desapercibido, ...


5

Pess a la creencia general, el DRAE no es exhaustivo. En él no aparecen todas las palabras derivadas y, sobre todo, no aparece el vocabulario técnico o propio de un área específica. En este caso, sí aparece la palabra decremento (sinónimo de disminución), de la que podemos derivar decrementar como verbo bien formado que, tal como dices, se utiliza ...


4

It's Surimi Why I'm telling that? I have searched in the RAE and others dictionaries and I haven't found the word. I have search in the net and I found sea food related. Caribbean Spanish is sometime mixed with English so the "me" in surime if you pronounce it in English sounds like "mi" in Spanish. Also, surimi is a type of crab imitation.


4

When I lived in Nicaragua I learned how to make repocheta. From what everyone's saying I'm going to assume it is a Nicaraguan recipe. It seems that no one has heard of it outside of Nica. You would cook up a batch of red beans (I always put a clove or two of garlic in mine). Then you would blend them up with a couple of bell peppers, tomatoes, and an ...


4

I would say camarada is mostly used when referring to someone that shares your own political party or political view, in general (Wikipedia has a good explanation as to how and when it became popular). It shouldn't have a bad connotation but unfortunately in Latin America is mostly used by the far left, the far right and the terrorists in between: The PSUV ...


4

El diccionario de la RAE recoge 1420 palabras con las cinco vocales. Son muchas menos que las que aporta angus en su respuesta porque aquí no se incluyen todas las conjugaciones, enclíticos, etc. Como preguntas por palabras de uso común, te pongo aquí las diez primeras por su frecuencia de uso en el español, según el corpus CREA: consecuencia ayuntamiento ...


4

The name camarada comes from camera, room. Comrades are roommates. Have you ever heard of communism ? Yes. In France, we say camarade a lot. Of course, camarade is the established name between communists, and between socialists too. Jean Ferrat has even made a beautiful song of it. But the word camarade is also often used without political meaning. It is ...


4

No, that's a bad transcription. The actual word being sung is sucieza, which isn't proper Spanish also, but it's derived from sucio [dirty]. So the line: Te ha jugado una sucieza no merece tu perdón. can be roughly translated as: She played you dirty, she doesn't deserve your forgiveness.


3

Enantiosemia: Se llama enantiosemia a un tipo de polisemia en el que una palabra tiene dos sentidos opuestos.


3

For the second question, in Spain, though it's not very widely used, it is perfectly understood.


3

I google searched "sobadito comida" (please hold the easy jokes:P)and all the results I found refered both to "sobaos" and others refered to "bizcohos de soletilla" or "Melindros" but people called them sobaditos in some reciepes.


3

Depends on the context. Haiga - big/posh car (slang) Haiga - A common incorrect conjugation of the verb 'haber'. I have seen this been used a few times when the person really wants to say 'haya'.


3

No es un término exclusivamente mexicano; en Colombia también es un término usado: ver este artículo del periódico El Universal, de Cartagena, titulado precisamente El predialazo. Predialazo es, literalmente, un "golpe dado con el predial". Cuando un gobierno local decide hacer un ajuste desmedido al impuesto predial (o impuesto a la renta), entonces se ...


3

Este sitio ofrece una explicación interesante, y menciona lo primero que se me vino a la mente, el payaso ESO de Stephen King que es un personaje aterrador y ciertamente creo yo que coincide con las connotaciones negativas de la expresión, sin embargo aparentemente la frase es mas antigua que la película (o el libro). En resumen un origen creíble y ...


3

Los llaman encuadernadores, me acuerdo que los usabamos en primaria en vez de grapadoras y demás para no hacernos daño


3

En el diccionario ofrecen tambien "pasmado", a mi me gusta mucho.


3

anonadado también aplica, aunque tampoco es de uso común


2

"Tracatera" es un término coloquial (¿posiblemente onomatopéyico?) usado en México para referirse a una "balacera"; he aquí una estrofa de uno de los así denominados "Narco-corridos" en el que se utiliza "tracatera": Sonaba la tracatera seis federales lloraban aprovechó ese momento y se subió a su blindada así salió de su casa ...


2

'Sobar' is used also as "to knead". So a "sobadito" could means a biscuit of dough well kneaded.


2

I never heard it in Spain. We use: Pablo la lleva Pablo la tiene Pablo (se) la queda (just in the moment he has started to be it) This game is also known in some countries as "la anda" (probably in Nicaragua) and they say "la anda" for "to be it". Maybe you misunderstood "Pablo se landa" and they really had said "Pablo se la anda".



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible