Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Las reglas de colocación de clíticos permiten ambas formas. Las dos frases son correctas y perfectamente intercambiables. Mira el punto 3.d del artículo sobre los pronombres personales átonos del Diccionario Panhispánico de Dudas: Como hablante de España, debo decir también que las dos formas no solo son posibles según las reglas gramaticales, sino que ...


7

Do you want me to invite you? La traducción literal sería: ¿Quieres que te invite? Pero yo te recomendaría utilizar la siguiente expresión, que a mi parecer suena mejor: ¿Puedo invitarte? ¿Me permites invitarte? ó ¿Me permites que te invite? ¿Me dejas invitarte? ó ¿Me dejas que te invite? Estas 3 frases serían la traducción para ...


2

In spanish the first tends to be used when the speaker you are reffering is decided to do it, while the second one is conditioned and he/she won't do it due to something. Maybe with the verb comprar in this example we cannot apply the general rule from Presente to Pretérito Imperfecto del indicativo except if we specify when because the verb itself only ...


2

First things first: By "pero" you mean "perro" , am i right?. :-) 1) Means he was doing that while talking. Sound to me like: Dijo que estaba comprando... (He/she said he was buying the dog). At the same moment of talking. 2) Means that he/she would buy the dog in the future from the moment of the conversation, but... we still don't know if he really did ...


2

It's not a matter of identifying direct or indirect objects. It's a matter of the right choice of the preposition. "Te voy a presentar a mi novia" means "I am going to introduce my girlfriend to you" If you want to invert the person that is being introduced, you use either con or ante (as Emilo Gort stated in his answer, the latter could sound ...


1

Hay que tener cuidado con las preguntas "a quién, para quién" y ciertos verbos. En el caso: Me gusta el chocolate Puede uno preguntar : ¿A quién le gusta el chocolate? --> A mí -> Me complemento indirecto. Pero si se pregunta ¿Qué me gusta? --> El chocolate --> Chocolate: complemento directo, estaríamos cometiendo un error, ya que chocolate es el ...


1

Una posibilidad es la de usar el mismo verbo en forma transitiva e intransitiva. Por ejemplo, con el verbo "llevar" puedes construir estas dos frases, donde "Rosa" en cada caso es objeto directo o indirecto: -Lleva a Rosa este libro. -Lleva a Rosa a la estación. Si la gente con la que hablas es de habla inglesa o conoce el inglés, una de las gracias de ...


1

La traducción sería más bien: ¿Te gustaría que te invite? Aunque, si he entendido bien el sentido de la frase en inglés, el objetivo de la frase parece darle a entender que podrías invitarle si él quisiera. En español solemos ser más directos, y más que preguntar por si quieres que te invite, se preguntaría directamente: ¿Te gustaría venir?


1

OK, in Spanish if you say that sentence, there is not way people can be completely sure about the action. In both case, both of them will be meeting each other, so really is not that important, but... if you want to make things more clear, then Spanish is a very open language. I would prefer to use something like this: (...to introduce my girlfriend to you) ...


1

Te is the Direct/Indirect Object Pronouns Te => you http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/iodopro.htm Update You're right, the problem here is at least I use that phrase Te voy a presentar a mi novia. indistinctly for both cases. It depend of the context. I note English is more precise than Spanish. If you want to be more precise to get I am going to ...


1

The difference is quite subtle. In the first case, you are pretty confident that the person will do as she said, while in the second case you are not so confident. The conditional always expresses a possibility and not a certainty. María dijo que compraba el perro --> María said that she was buying the dog and you have no reason to believe that she did not ...


1

Being reflexive is not an invariant characteristic: it's not preserved under translation. In this context, to take (llevarse) is reflexive in Spanish. What se at the end of the verb means is take (with them), which in English might sound obvious, but in Spanish it's necessary. There are other instances of this phenomenon: the right translation of This ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible