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8

los is an article. The right pronoun in this case is ellos. Otherwise it is a perfectly correct sentence, with a couple corrections: Muchas gracias por tus excelentes libros y videos. He aprendido mucho de ellos.


5

El problema con la primera frase no es que sobre el lo, si no el uso redundante del pronombre "lo" y el "se", que puede ser entendido también como pronombre. En la segunda frase Si el repollo es demasiado duro, se puede colocar incluso antes de de las papas. Has eliminado el pronombre "lo" que se refiere al repollo, por el "se", que en este caso es un ...


3

Sí, se puede terminar una oración con un pronombre. Esta te suena mal, porque el pronombre (que no artículo) los está en acusativo, y cuando se usa preposición, el pronombre de 3ª persona plural que debe usarse es ellos. Les y los se usan siempre sin preposición, y cuando van tras el verbo se escriben junto a él. Sin embargo, ese tipo de construcción, ...


2

You can (you use the pronoun to refer to something that you have already named in the same sentence), but when you are saying ... he aprendido mucho de los. you are actually ending the sentence with an articucle, not a pronoun. That's why it sounds off. You are actually saying, "I have learnt a lot form the", not "I have learnt a lot from them". Some ...


2

The word textear does not exist in Spanish, you will not find any entrance in RAE and in any dictionary. Use escribir un texto instead of textear, both means the same but the first one includes the direct object. Le escribí (un texto , CD). (Le, CI) escribí (un texto, CD) Escribí (un texto, CD) (a mi abuelo, CI) I have never heard this word ...


2

His leg hurts would be correctly translated as "Le duele la pierna", literally, "The leg hurts him". In this respect, it functions exactly as in English, except that an object is obligatory, rather than optional. If you wanted to say that Ronaldo's leg hurts, you would just specify him as the explicity indirect object: "Le duele la pierna a Ronaldo". In ...


2

La respuesta de Diego es correcta. Añado que la ambigüedad del "se" en este caso implica que la primera frase no es incorrecta, aunque la segunda sea (marginalmente) preferible. Que no es incorrecta se puede comprobar cambiando de lugar el "lo": Si el repollo es demasiado duro, se puede colocarlo incluso antes de las papas. Si el repollo es ...


1

Both of your options are correct and perfectly acceptable. You should translate demonstrative pronouns as they are: (D.P.) Can you hold this for me? => ¿Me puedes sostener esto? (D.P.) Can you hold that for me? => ¿Me puedes sostener eso? (D.O.) Can you hold it for me? => ¿Me lo puedes sostener? In short: There's no need to change demonstrative ...


1

In English, any noun can be employed as if it were a verb. Don't let the grammarians tell you otherwise. Using the noun "text" as a verb is a case in point. This usage was introduced into the language by young people. Young people were the first to assimilate the smart phone into their culture. In Spanish, the form of a word indicates the part of ...


1

If you simply say, Yo la texteé It has no other object at all, it must be direct. Yo le textée mi dirección a ella When you dismantle this sentence you get Yo texteé mi dirección. -- This sentence contains the direct object A ella (le texteé) -- An this one the indrect, becase Ella is not what the subject texted. More information: ...


1

The answer from guifa is very good. Please notice that in several regions of Spain people uses this forms in the wrong way. It's a phenomena known as "leísmo" when they use le form instead of lo/la and "laísmo" when they use lo/la instead of le. As far as I know, it does not happens on south america.


1

Luisa is both subject (of your first clause) and, as you deduce, direct object (in the second clause). To roughly gauge what the direct and indirect objects are, you can formulate a question with the subject and the verb: . ¿Qué observé yo? direct object . o bien ¿Quién observé yo? direct object . ¿Para quién observé yo? indirect object . o bien ¿Para ...


1

In Standard Spanish, there is generally no distinction made in animacy for the object pronouns1. Lo and la are used for direct objects, being lo for masculine2 and la feminine. Le is used for indirect objects3 and represents the recipient of an action. This sentence is a bit tricky, because the verb doesn't correlate in transivity to English. Let's try ...



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