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Santiago, (also San Iago, San Tiago, Santyago, Sant-Yago, San Thiago) is a Spanish name that derives from the Hebrew name Jacob (Ya'akov) via "Sant Iago," "Sant Yago," "Santo Iago," or "Santo Yago," first used to denote Saint James the Great, the brother of John the Apostle. It was also the tradition that Saint James (Santiago) had traveled to the Iberian ...


4

There is one structure that many linguists use but is seldom referred by grammarians in either English or Spanish: the middle voice. You know the active voice: María vende pan. | Mary sells bread. and the passive voice: El pan es vendido (por María). | Bread is sold (by Mary). The passive voice can have an explicit agent (“by Mary”) or a tacit ...


3

Err, sorry to say but you're on the wrong track. I'll see if I can take an example and answer it and see if I can enlighten you as to why, but you've really come up with some brain twisters here (at least to someone like me; English is my second language and Spanish is my first so the first thing to keep in mind is that our linguistics function differently ...


2

Yes, it is true. I think it also depends on who you are addressing and how much confident you are with each other, since those name-modifications are usually used between friends, relatives or someone you are familiar with. For changing these names using some rules, you can refer to the "sufijos diminutivos" diminutive suffixes(e.g. Carlitos) in this link ...



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