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14

Vowels in Spanish have a very distinct sound, maybe because there are only 5 of them. So for two words to sound similar they should have more or less the same vowels, particularly the tonic one. For example jade and jode, just one vowel of difference, but you cannot even make a play on words! Same with Óscar/asco. The r can be played around but the o/a ...


9

Santiago, (also San Iago, San Tiago, Santyago, Sant-Yago, San Thiago) is a Spanish name that derives from the Hebrew name Jacob (Ya'akov) via "Sant Iago," "Sant Yago," "Santo Iago," or "Santo Yago," first used to denote Saint James the Great, the brother of John the Apostle. It was also the tradition that Saint James (Santiago) had traveled to the Iberian ...


9

These are acceptable translations: No me llaman ... por nada. No me llaman ... en vano. Alternatively, you can use the more idiomatic (in Spain): Por algo me llaman ...


8

If the name ends in a vowel but no "I": eliminate the vowel and add "ito/illo/ín/iño" (male) or "ita/illa/ina/iña" (female). Eduardo - Eduardito/Eduardillo/Eduardín/Eduardiño Manolo - Manolito/Manolillo/Manolín/Manoliño Mirta - Mirtita/Mirtilla/Mirtina/Mirtiña Marco - Marquito/Marquillo/Marquín/Marquiño Carlo - Carlito/Carlillo/Carlín/Carliño ...


7

That's depends on the use and, as far as I know, there is no official denomination. On graves: Desconocido/a + number or Indocumentado/a + number Official forms/documents: They usually use a common name + common surnames something like María García García or José Pérez García or even Nombre: Nombre Apellidos: Apellido Apellido Surnames for ...


6

Perdona/Disculpa, ¿cómo te llamabas? Perdone/Disculpe, ¿cómo se llamaba? (more formal) Perdona/Disculpa, ¿cúal era tu nombre? Perdone/Disculpe, ¿cúal era su nombre? (more formal) Perdona/Disculpa, ¿me puedes decir tu nombre (de nuevo)? Perdone/Disculpe, ¿me puede decir su nombre de nuevo (de nuevo)? (more formal) Another ones ...


5

A formal equivalent of John Doe (e.g. legal matters) in Spanish is N.N., derived from the Latin nomen nescio. Fulano, Perano, Zutano, Mengano, etc are used informally.


5

You guys are right. It literally means "coffee with legs", but is not the right interpretation. As I live in Chile (not Santiago, but this therm is widely used here), I can tell your interpretations are almost right. A "coffee with legs" is a place where you can drink a nice coffee, and enjoy the view of the waitresses. They dress with very tight and short ...


4

You are right, the translation is "coffee with legs", no article. From my point of view (Spanish native-speaker and English learner), I would say it's just naturalising to a sentence instead of literally translating it. Thus, I would say it's the journalistic way of explaining what it means or what it's about, like in many other articles in many languages.


4

There is one structure that many linguists use but is seldom referred by grammarians in either English or Spanish: the middle voice. You know the active voice: María vende pan. | Mary sells bread. and the passive voice: El pan es vendido (por María). | Bread is sold (by Mary). The passive voice can have an explicit agent (“by Mary”) or a tacit ...


3

Óscar doesn't sound like 'asqueroso' at all.


3

John Doe Padre John Doe Hijo most likely won't use anything equivalent to Mr. Sometimes we use Don (man) or Doña (woman), but that is used to convey respect and only for people over 50 years old Don Juan Alvarez Doña Elvira Rodriguez de Alvarez (his wife) Juan Alvarez hijo


3

Err, sorry to say but you're on the wrong track. I'll see if I can take an example and answer it and see if I can enlighten you as to why, but you've really come up with some brain twisters here (at least to someone like me; English is my second language and Spanish is my first so the first thing to keep in mind is that our linguistics function differently ...


2

Yes, it is true. I think it also depends on who you are addressing and how much confident you are with each other, since those name-modifications are usually used between friends, relatives or someone you are familiar with. For changing these names using some rules, you can refer to the "sufijos diminutivos" diminutive suffixes(e.g. Carlitos) in this link ...


2

It is just the name of the taquería The United Fruit Company is a company name. La Michoacana in this case is the name too. Since Spanish uses more articles than English, stores names have one most of the times.


2

In "La Michoacana" the article "La" is telling you that the place is bound to "Michoacan" state, being "Michoacana" treated like you would treat a nationality. It's like "The American Shop", you're saying that the shop is bound to America or has something to do with it.


1

I have been pondering this question myself lately, and I have a theory to why Oscar is a common name in Spanish speaking countries. As a very young child I assumed my dad's name was somehow spanish because his name Oscar. It turned out that he is actually Swedish, and Oscar or Oskar is an even more common name in Sweden and common throughout all Germanic ...


1

More or less as MikeWats mentioned, stores are often named by store type (zapatería, bar, cafetería, taquería, etc) and then given a juxtaposed name (that is, placed without a preposition). It's common anywhere not just in Mexico but all over the Spanish-speaking world, although less so with newer more commercial/(inter)national places that go with a single ...


1

The full name is "La Michoacana" For instance , could be : Ferretería Don Pepe Taqueria Los Hermanos Neveria La Michoacana --> Famous in Mexico In México is a common way for naming stores , in this case it´s named for the State of Michoacan.


1

No me llaman a menos que sea importante would be an expression often heard in support positions. UPDATE: After OP's clarification No me dicen/llaman ... por nada/en vano would seem to fit OP's question.



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